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Old 07-17-2011, 10:39 AM - Thread Starter
 
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In another thread someone mentioned Cashew Cheez. I did a quick google search and read two very different recipes. I'd love to hear differing stories on making and using cashew cheez.

 

Thanks


Created an instant family (7/89 and 5/91) in 1997. Made a baby boy 12/05 adopted a baby girl 8/08. Ask me about tandem adoptive nursing. Now living as gluten, dairy, cane sugar, and tomato free vegetarians. Homeschooling and loving it.

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Old 07-17-2011, 09:36 PM
 
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We go through Cashew Cheez phases around here - sometimes a lot of it, sometimes we forget about it.  But it can be really yummy and satisfying.

 

I don't really follow a recipe anymore when I make it.  The ingredients are:  "raw" cashews (they aren't actually raw.  Cashews are not edible raw.  I think the ones labelled "raw" in stores are actually boiled or something), enough water to barely cover them in the blender, a handful or more of nutritional yeast, onion powder, lemon juice and salt.  Then blend it until it's very smooth.  I vary the consistency based on the recipe I want to use it in.  If I don't mind a creamy and spreadable cheez, then I just use it as is out of the blender.  If I want more of a sliceable cheez, then I add some tapioca or corn starch to the mixture and then cook it over low heat in a saucepan while stirring constantly.  Then I chill it uncovered to solidify.

 

The only thing - make sure that you don't get a batch of old cashews.  They taste kind of like a horse smells - yuck.  If you buy them in bulk, sometimes you can taste a few first. 

 

I've found that raw pepitas work very well in place of cashews -  they're grown closer to where we live (cashews are tropical nuts), so they are better environmentally, and there doesn't seem to be as much of a freshness issue.

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Old 07-17-2011, 10:34 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Thanks. This is really helpful. I read a recipe about using something fermented. Do you know anything about that?

 

Also, how do you eat the stuff?

 

I've read nutritional yeast is chemically similar to msg. I wonder what you could use instead.


Created an instant family (7/89 and 5/91) in 1997. Made a baby boy 12/05 adopted a baby girl 8/08. Ask me about tandem adoptive nursing. Now living as gluten, dairy, cane sugar, and tomato free vegetarians. Homeschooling and loving it.

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Old 07-18-2011, 09:48 PM
 
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I'm sorry it took me so long to get back to you on the other thread! In case you don't see the other respone, I'll copy and paste it:

 

 Here is a basic recipe that everyone in my family REALLY likes:

 

3 cups cashews (If you have the time, soak them in cool water for 4 hours ahead of time...makes a really smooth cheeze)

3 cloves of garlic (we LOVE garlic...so we use 6 yummy.gif)

2 tbs. lemon juice

salt to taste

 

Throw it all in the food processor or high speed blender and blend until smooth!

 

It is really easy to make variations of this recipe too!

For "nacho" cheeze (for "quesadillas" or tacos etc.) I add  3 tbs. nutritional yeast, 2 tsp. cumin and 1 jalapeno

For "italian" cheeze (for zucchini lasagna, pasta, cheeze sandwhiches etc.) I add (dried or fresh) orregano, basil and sage

 

You get the idea thumb.gif

 

I personally don't think it is totally necessary to use yeast, but it is definitely a tasty treat every now and then.

 

I put it on everything....pizzas, sandwhiches, veggie slices, wraps, rice, steamed veggies, "quesadillas", pasta....etc.

 

Hopefully that helps!!

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Old 07-19-2011, 07:03 AM
 
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I keep wanted to try this fermented cheeze recipe: http://thesunnyrawkitchen.blogspot.com/2008/04/not-cheeze-pleaze.html (scroll past the book) except I am allergic to cashews & wheat (rejuvelac) so I can't lol. I did some adaptations of it using sunflower seeds and miso paste and it was pretty good, I think I needed to add some probiotics or something though & it would have come out better.

The nutritional yeast/MSG thing is pretty controversial... I concluded that I feel comfortable eating it (in moderate amounts, of course)... I'm not sure that there's anything you could use in it's place. It's a pretty distinct flavor. But you could just leave it out, it just won't taste as cheesy.

I've done other non-fermented variations of cheeze too, like a cream cheese with macadamia nuts, vinegar, lemon juice, salt, and chives... that was really yummy (actually now I'm craving it...) Kind of fun to just experiment, I started when I was making my own nut/seed milks and trying to use up the leftover pulp... I really should get back to doing that. thumb.gif

We use soft cheezes in wraps, on crackers or veggies, as a pasta sauce...

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Old 07-19-2011, 01:20 PM
 
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Dr. Gabriel Cousens has a wheat-free, cashew free fermented yougurt and cheez recipe in his book, "Concious Eating". It is a lot more complicated than regular cheeze recipe, and I haven't had the chance to try it yet.

 

Here it is:

1. Make a seed sauce by blending soaked nuts (almonds, cashews) and/or seeds (pumpkin, sunflower) with herbs and spices. Use enlugh water to create a sauce-like consistency.

 

2. Place the seed sauce in a jar with a screen or cheese-cloth secured over the top by a rubber band. Lert it stand at a temperature between 70 and 90 degrees.

 

3. Friendly airborne lactobacillus organisms will automatically inoculate your blend, but the fermentation process can be aided by using a little of the seed cheese or yogurt from the last batch as a starter.

 

4. As the fermentation proceeds, health promoting lactic acid is produced and the predigestion process of the proteins, fats and complex carbohydrates occurs. It is thought that the bacteria also produce B12.

 

5. As the seed yogurt/cheese ripens, the whey (the watery portion) begins to separate. This takes 4-6 hours. At this point what one has created is called a seed yogurt. If you want to enjoy this creation as yogurt (rather than seed cheese), don't "lose the whey", pour it into your compost bucket. You may eat the yogurt on the spot or you may stop the fermentation process by putting the yogurt in the refrigerator to eat later.

 

6. If you allow the process to continue, after 8-10 hours the whey completely separates from the seed "curd". It is time to make seed cheese from the creation. The whey will be on the bottom and the cheese will be on the top. Seeing bubbles in the cheese and smelling lemony odor indicates that the seed cheese is ripe for harvesting.

 

7. To harvest, pour off the whey. A simple way to do this is to take a chopstick and poke a hole in the cheese along the side of the jar. Then gently pour off the whey through this hole through a sprouting bag or cheesecloth.

 

8. Following this, the seed cheese will empty into the sprouting bag. Squeeze the seed cheese in the sprouting bag or cheesecloth to force out the remaining whey. If you squeeze too hard, the bag may burst and the cheese will get "a whey!" If this happens, it is comforting to know that you are not the first person in the world to whom this has happened, nor will you be the last.

 

9. To continue to dry out your seed cheese, wring out and squeeze the seed cheese that is now in the sprouting bag. Then let the sprouting bag or cheesecloth hang on a hook for several hours for any residual whey to drip off.

 

10. After drying, the seed cheese can be eaten or stored in the refrigerator 3-4 days.

 

 

Hope that helps! Let me know if you have any questions about the instructions.

 

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Old 07-19-2011, 05:25 PM
 
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Thanks ahimsamom, I will have to try that process soon!! thumb.gif

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Old 07-19-2011, 10:19 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Wow, ahimsamom, that is something I never heard of before. It sounds great. Overwhelming, but great. It's definitely in my future.


Created an instant family (7/89 and 5/91) in 1997. Made a baby boy 12/05 adopted a baby girl 8/08. Ask me about tandem adoptive nursing. Now living as gluten, dairy, cane sugar, and tomato free vegetarians. Homeschooling and loving it.

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Old 08-02-2011, 12:46 AM
 
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100_1445.JPG

You want the recipe to this "cheese" sauce? Its made with pine nuts

 

1 1/2 cup pine nuts

3/4 cups water

3 Tbs lemon juice

1 ts miso paste

2 ts salt

3 Tbs Nutritional Yeast

1 ts garlic powder

1 ts dried minced onion

1 ts paprika (Don't use smoked paprika. Use the stuff that comes in the clear plastic packets in the Mexican section of the grocery store.)

 

Simply blend until creamy! I have a cheap blender so I have to blend then stir it, then blend again. Repeating as necessary.

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Old 08-02-2011, 08:36 PM
 
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That looks so good planthappymama! I am getting ingredients for that tomorrow.

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Old 08-02-2011, 10:39 PM - Thread Starter
 
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That looks great. Have you tried that with cashews?


Created an instant family (7/89 and 5/91) in 1997. Made a baby boy 12/05 adopted a baby girl 8/08. Ask me about tandem adoptive nursing. Now living as gluten, dairy, cane sugar, and tomato free vegetarians. Homeschooling and loving it.

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Old 08-02-2011, 11:21 PM
 
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You could totally do it with cashews. I just like pine nuts cuz you don't need to soak them and they blend so well in my cheap blender! Just make sure to soak the cashews and blend really well. My hubby hates any chunks in his nacho cheeze! It will taste the same I'm sure! Let me know how it goes. I have other recipes on my blog http://planthappylife.blogspot.com/

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Old 08-05-2011, 07:38 AM
 
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I am attempting to start the fermented recipe today...but I think I am going to make yogurt, not cheez. I will post my results in a couple days!!

 

Oh, and I am so lazy, I hardly ever soak my cashews for cheez. I just toss them in the food processor, grind them up and slowly add water. I seem to be able to get them really smooth this way (but maybe it's just my equipment!).

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Old 08-05-2011, 10:11 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ahimsamom View Post

I am attempting to start the fermented recipe today...but I think I am going to make yogurt, not cheez. I will post my results in a couple days!!

 

Oh, and I am so lazy, I hardly ever soak my cashews for cheez. I just toss them in the food processor, grind them up and slowly add water. I seem to be able to get them really smooth this way (but maybe it's just my equipment!).


What type of food processor do you have? I'm looking for one with a glass or stainless steel bowl, but they are not reasonably priced. (I only find commercial level stainless steel.)

 


Created an instant family (7/89 and 5/91) in 1997. Made a baby boy 12/05 adopted a baby girl 8/08. Ask me about tandem adoptive nursing. Now living as gluten, dairy, cane sugar, and tomato free vegetarians. Homeschooling and loving it.

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Old 08-06-2011, 12:43 PM
 
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Yeah, I am realizing my magic bullet pulverizes everything, so I don't soak my cashews any more either. I might buy a ninja though.

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Old 08-06-2011, 09:38 PM
 
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I have a Cuisinart Prep 9 food processor. I did a lot of research and I think it is the best bang for your buck. It is my workhorse! I use it AT LEAST twice a days, and I have had it for about 2 years with no problems whatsoever.

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