Need ideas / recipes for someone with gall bladder removed - Mothering Forums

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Old 08-11-2008, 06:22 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Hello! I have a friend who has had her gall bladder removed and so she has pain when she eats fatty foods, especially meats. So, does anyone have good ideas or recipes that use combos of other protein sources so she can get a good mixture of all the amino acids? She was interested in trying to work tofu into her diet, but I know too much processed soy isn't really a good thing.

On another note, her husband is a real "meat and potatoes" kinda guy and she has no idea how to make meals that please them both. She is trying to help him eat healthier. That's another problem to tackle.

So, post your favorite recipe here please

Thanks for your help!
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Old 08-11-2008, 11:59 AM
 
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I had my gallbladder out last year, so I'll try to help. My digestive issues did not resolve with the removal, and I have gone vegan in order to cope. It has made a HUGE difference in my well-being. Every person has different sensitivities, though, so she may be able to tolerate things that I couldn't or vice versa.

You'll have to remember, though, that the protein combination theory for vegetarians has been put to bed. Just as long as she's getting balanced meals throughout the day, she should do fine.

Soy is actually a huge undigestible for me. I've mostly had to cut it out of my diet. We have learned to make wheat gluten loaf (seitan), which subs as a "meat."

Beans were hit or miss. Some, like pinto, are fine. But others, like black beans or split peas cause horrible pain.

Nuts, seeds and nut butters, also kind of oily, were no good at first, but I am getting them back in. Tahini (sesame seed paste) is one of my favorites for salad dressings and noodles.

This will probably require her to rethink the way she eats in general. There are so many great veggie websites and cookbooks out there to get you guys started. I wish you the best!
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Old 08-11-2008, 12:06 PM
 
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i had my gall bladder out 6 years ago, and after the intinal recovery, can tolerat almost any foods (high fat foods i have found "move though" quicker, otherwise - no issues).

It took me about a month through to feel back to normal, and you didnt see where you mentioned when she had hers removed. I know for the first month, i was still eating mostly the BRAT diet (bananas, rice, applesauce, toast), while trying 1 item at a time. i found sticking mostly to bland foods was most helpful at first, while adding in more flavorfull foods, spices, etc.

~Kris mama to Alexis (15), Elizabeth (10), Andrew (7), and 1 angel
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Old 08-12-2008, 12:13 AM
 
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Gosh, I didn't realize you still have these problems AFTER having your GB removed!! I have the same ones WITH my GB full of stones. I was vegan first though so only had to cut way back on fats.

As a PP said, vital wheat gluten is high in protein and a good "meaty" vegan substitute. It's easy to make, although you do need to simmer for an hour. After that you can cook it as any meat. Great for stews. It's chewy and holds its form and can be flavored however you want. As long as wheat isn't an issue its easy to digest.

Black beans and white beans are harder to digest than others. Nuts and especially seeds are easier to digest. You can grind up almonds, (raw are best), ass water, squeeze it out and have almond milk. The left over "nut meat" can be used to make yummy salads, pate and cookies.

Teff is a grain that is high in protein, as is quinoa.


Good luck!

Mom to three and owner of Earthetarian Happy, healthy and handmade.
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Old 08-12-2008, 12:58 AM
 
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After having your gallbladder removed you do not need a special diet. Your gallbladder contracts in response to fat in your duodenum (1st part of the intestine). If you have gallstones or a dysfunctional gallblader this will cause symptoms, however, if your gallbladder has been removed it is not a problem.
That being said, there are some other issues that can cause problems after gallbladder removal. If you (or your friend) are having any sort of food intolerances you should speak to your surgeon. Your system is significantly changed after surgery but hopefully for the better.
I'm a surgeon who removes people's galbladders.
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Old 08-12-2008, 11:19 AM
 
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Originally Posted by cooltubnoac View Post
After having your gallbladder removed you do not need a special diet. Your gallbladder contracts in response to fat in your duodenum (1st part of the intestine). If you have gallstones or a dysfunctional gallblader this will cause symptoms, however, if your gallbladder has been removed it is not a problem.
That being said, there are some other issues that can cause problems after gallbladder removal. If you (or your friend) are having any sort of food intolerances you should speak to your surgeon. Your system is significantly changed after surgery but hopefully for the better.
I'm a surgeon who removes people's galbladders.
Oooh! how I'd love to have you sitting on my deck with a cup of tea! When I went to a surgeon, that is what she said, too, but why does it seem like so many have digestive problems AFTER having their gb removed? It seems to me like the constant dripping bile into your intestine would cause havoc! I know lots of people have it done and are fine, but it seems like it could cause problems later in life too. Long term loss of proper nutrient absorption? How does the body recover for this? Are there other options? Say, for instance, you fix the problem causing the stones in the first place. Could you have the stones broken up and be okay after that?

Did I totally just hijak this thread? sorry. I'm out of line.

Mom to three and owner of Earthetarian Happy, healthy and handmade.
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Old 08-12-2008, 05:24 PM
 
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Right you are. The constant dripping can cause a truly more irritable bowel...not to be confused with the oft-diagnosed IBS...that can be more sensitive to high fat foods. Most people's intestines are able to quickly adapt, but not all. There is a sphincter located between the common bile duct and the duodenum which, just like the gallbladder, is activated by fat. So, people who've had their GB removed can still get a rush of bile in response to a fatty meal. And some have to rush off to the toliet because of that. Unfortunately, many food intolerances have similiar symptoms to a gallbladder attack. Gallstones are often times asymptomatic and can be found incidentally while a patient is having GI upset due to another cause. So when I hear that a patient is having the same symptoms that she had prior to her gb being removed, I start barking up another tree.
The problem that causes gallstones is rather complicated. It is an issue of concentration of three different components. Like many things in the body...balance is key. Destroying the stones has been tried and unfortunately, it did not have good results. The stones invariably returned. There are many ways gallstones can be symptomatic, some relatively minor though uncomfortable, and some life threatening. If I'm convinced that the gallstones are causing the patient's symptoms I offer to remove the gallbladder before things can get worse.
Luckily we're on that illusionary internet deck of yours, if you were in my office ...that would be $500 please.
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Old 08-14-2008, 09:57 AM
 
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Originally Posted by cooltubnoac View Post
Right you are. The constant dripping can cause a truly more irritable bowel...not to be confused with the oft-diagnosed IBS...that can be more sensitive to high fat foods. Most people's intestines are able to quickly adapt, but not all. There is a sphincter located between the common bile duct and the duodenum which, just like the gallbladder, is activated by fat. So, people who've had their GB removed can still get a rush of bile in response to a fatty meal. And some have to rush off to the toliet because of that. Unfortunately, many food intolerances have similiar symptoms to a gallbladder attack. Gallstones are often times asymptomatic and can be found incidentally while a patient is having GI upset due to another cause. So when I hear that a patient is having the same symptoms that she had prior to her gb being removed, I start barking up another tree.
The problem that causes gallstones is rather complicated. It is an issue of concentration of three different components. Like many things in the body...balance is key. Destroying the stones has been tried and unfortunately, it did not have good results. The stones invariably returned. There are many ways gallstones can be symptomatic, some relatively minor though uncomfortable, and some life threatening. If I'm convinced that the gallstones are causing the patient's symptoms I offer to remove the gallbladder before things can get worse.
Luckily we're on that illusionary internet deck of yours, if you were in my office ...that would be $500 please.
Thank you so much for all that info!!!! I had a major GB attack and the US showed lots of little stones. I've been controlling it for over three years now with low fat diet and haven't formed new stones according to follow up US. I can tell if I've eaten something my gb doesn't like and have a homeopathic remedy that will stop the pain if an attack starts. I'm hesitant to have surgery because I don't want to go through that and have problems after.
So can I pay you in MDC credits?

Mom to three and owner of Earthetarian Happy, healthy and handmade.
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Old 09-03-2013, 09:17 PM
 
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not true, im 9 years later with no gallbladder and frequently have attacks. im finally realizing my diet will have to change to the special gall bladder diet!!

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