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#31 of 59 Old 03-20-2010, 05:29 PM
 
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I wonder, will there be another female teacher in the cabin? I find it odd that they would only have one teacher in with the kids. Maybe there is a 2nd teacher that is more approachable. Can you approach the teacher and just let her know that you are expecting dd to have some difficulty with sleeping on her own. Maybe the teacher is not a strict and warmer than she seems.
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#32 of 59 Old 03-20-2010, 06:07 PM
 
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I can't imagine the teacher not nurturing a scared child in the middle of the night. Second graders are still very young children.
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#33 of 59 Old 03-20-2010, 06:58 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Again, dd wants to go for the daytime activities, but the nighttime is what has her stressed. She really wants to go and have fun with her friends, but wants to sleep in bed with us at home.

That is the long and short of it. It's pretty simple. I don't know how to explain it so that "wanting" to go and "being scared" to go is understandable to coexist at the same time for her. I think most people have things the "want" to do, but don't have the courage to do it because there's one element that holds them back.

As for how she handles anxiety... other than sleeping alone, she doesn't have any anxiety about anything (at least, I wouldn't label it as "anxiety"... she does sometimes worry about something, but it's short-lived). She's a very independent and adventurous child with nerves of steel and 'go-get-em' attitude. She'll do anything from jump in the deep end to ride a roller coaster to try a new food to enter a race just for the fun of it. She is a completely confident child and doesn't have any problems with any transition at all. She's never even had a temper tantrum in her life because she just adapts to well to new situations. She's a cool cucumber.

But this is one thing that she is troubled about, which is why I'm treading lightly to make sure that the next time she is faced with this situation, she approaches it like she does the tallest roller coasters at the amusement park - with confidence and not with memories of being terrified in the middle of the night because she wasn't prepared.

She will have a teacher she doesn't know in the cabin with her. She is the French teacher. As I said before, this teacher is known for being strict and not "touchy-feely" like dd is. It would not be a far reach to think that the teacher would yell at dd for being scared rather than nurturing her.

I will have to ask if a flashlight is allowed. I'm not sure about that. I know electronics are not allowed (cell, MP3, etc.)
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#34 of 59 Old 03-20-2010, 07:28 PM
 
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I hear what you're saying. I used to get homesick as a child. I WANTED to do sleepovers. I also got scared when it was time to go to sleep. I was the kid who got so homesick at overnight camp that I had to come home. I get it.

I can't see requiring a second grader to do an overnight. Especially a school where I pay tuition. If it were my child, in the situation you described, I would pick up my daughter at bedtime. If I got there and she wanted to stay, fine, but the plan would be that I picked her up.
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#35 of 59 Old 03-20-2010, 08:04 PM
 
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That is the long and short of it. It's pretty simple. I don't know how to explain it so that "wanting" to go and "being scared" to go is understandable to coexist at the same time for her. I think most people have things the "want" to do, but don't have the courage to do it because there's one element that holds them back.
I really do understand because DD had this exact issue with overnights. She truly wanted to go. It sounded like fun. The other kids thought it was fun. She tried to go several times. Then she decided she would just rather come home and not try (so go to the party until like 11pm) because she was getting embarrased. Then she went to a party and I planned on picking her up at midnight unless she called (she was in 4th grade, thinking about it) and she called and said she didn't want picked up (which had happened before) but... she stayed the night. Basically since then she has not had a problem. She was very proud and satisfied with herself. But she was also 9, not 7.

Is there any way DD can call you during the night if she changes her mind? What would she prefer. Sometimes DD wanted to plan on staying (unless she called me) and sometimes she wanted to plan on going home (unless she called me). Either way I encouraged her to bring something to read just in case she was up later than the other kids. Of course, I picked her up today at 11:30 from an overnight and she had not slept AT ALL so she is napping right now

 

 

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#36 of 59 Old 03-20-2010, 08:08 PM
 
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I used to be a camp counsellor, and I was also the child who desperately WANTED to go on sleepovers and COMPLETELY HATED them (at people's houses). (I still do. I will drive home at 3 am, thanks. Weirdly I love hotels and camping.)

Anyways, I'd recommend trying it.

I don't think as a worst case scenario the trauma of it will pooch her potential forever, as long as IF she does experience trauma you are understanding, give her ample room and time to process, and talk about how she's only 7 and things will change. I had horrendous sleepover experiences but I also had good ones and the best was that after a few bad ones I knew I could make it through if I really wanted to. I like having the choice. Even though I still hate them overall.

To avoid the worst-case scenario though I like ideas like loveys and music and even trial runs (although remember the trial can be worse than the actual one, because kids are sometimes weirdly soothed by having their friends doing the same thing).

Other things: Bring a favourite picture, pillowcase, bracelet that reminds her that she's safe and coming home soon. Tactile stuff is especially good at night. One trick that works with children as well as dogs is to send her with a t-shirt of yours to sleep in that you've slept in the night before or sprayed with your perfume.

Plan something to do after the event that she can look forward to.

I'd also talk to your daughter a bit about what she'll do in various cases...

"What if I have to go to the bathroom at night?"
"What if I can't sleep?" (Does she read? Can she take a flashlight and a favourite book?)
"What if I'm scared?" (wake the teacher, have a "bravery bracelet" to hold onto)

Also determine at which point you'll come get her, and make sure the teacher/leader is aware that you expect that you would be able to do so. You could also ask how they've handled that in the past. I would not, myself, recommend that you come to the camp to check in and leave if she's ok, because that 'second leaving' is often what triggers the worst homesickness.

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#37 of 59 Old 03-20-2010, 11:42 PM
 
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Velochic, I understand what you're saying and also what some of the other posters are saying.

It does seem like your dd, brave and fearless though she may be by light of day, has some real anxiety about nightime sleeping. The main thing that I have gleaned through tons of reading and real life experience with a kid who has tendencies toward anxiety is that it's a lot like balancing on a tightrope.

Throwing an anxious kid in the lake and telling them to sink or swim is just a recipe for disaster. An anxious kid is likely to be scared of water for life after that.

But likewise, letting an anxious child engage in avoidant behaviors and never go near the water is also likely to result in a kid who is afraid of water for life. Avoiding the anxiety provoking situation does nothing to abate the anxiety and, in fact, makes it worse.

If an anxious kid can put a toe in and test the waters and feel good about herself that she faced this fear and did that much then you've made progress and can continue to work on it.

The tricky thing about this campout situation is there's not much of a way to put a toe in the water on the campout itself. Sometimes an anxious kid does need a little push to get her over the hump as long as it's not a sink-or-swim-throw-'em-in-the-lake situation, but what's sink-or-swim for one anxious kid can just be the little nudge that another one needs. It's all, obviously, very individual.

Velochic, I think you're the only one who can read whether sending her on the campout is throwing her in the lake or whether it's the nudge she needs so that she doesn't engage in avoidant behavior and make her anxiety worse.

If you can think of some way to let her put her toe in the water ahead of time that would be ideal, but I don't know if you can come up with anything in your situation. A camp out in the backyard with a friend would be great, but it doesn't sound like that's really super practical right now.

Hope you can figure it all out.

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#38 of 59 Old 03-21-2010, 09:02 AM
 
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I don't see it as an "anxiety" issue in the classical sense that she either has to face it or she is avoiding life situations. She is 7 - this is a normal fear, even for non co-sleeping kids. She will outgrow it at some point. I see it as whether to encourage her to do something that she is ready for (but just a bit nervous) or trying to get her to do something that is beyond her current developmental age. Yes, some 7 year olds would do great and would not give it a second thought or just need some extra encouragement. Others are just not ready. That is not a bad thing, that is recognition of their true developmental age.

It is not simply about being up all night and reading a book, if it does not go well. It is potentially about a child's mind racing and heart pounding for 8 hours, feeling alone though surrounded by a dozen others, without a way of reaching out to the one or two people that can support her. Too fearful to sleep and too fearful to approach the only adult available. That cannot be a good combo if she is that anxious.

That said, the decision should be hers to make. If she decides to go, then you work on the tools she needs to succeed. If not, again, it is not a one-off experience that she will never have another shot at when she is developmentally ready for it. I don't think that it is wise to make a child "face a fear" for a fear that is developmentally appropriate.

Velochic, if there is anyway that you can arrange for her to go during the day and pick her up later, I would try to arrange it. I don't know how far the camp is and whether you can just take her home and bring her back in the morning. If not, is there a motel you could stay in close by to spend the night together? I would do my best to find a way for her to participate in the daytime activities so she does not miss out on that.

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#39 of 59 Old 03-21-2010, 02:21 PM
 
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That said, the decision should be hers to make. If she decides to go, then you work on the tools she needs to succeed. If not, again, it is not a one-off experience that she will never have another shot at when she is developmentally ready for it. I don't think that it is wise to make a child "face a fear" for a fear that is developmentally appropriate.
I completely agree with this and it seems the OP is going to follow her dd's lead on this, which is great, imo.

Velochic, my DS is 8.5 and we still more or less co-sleep. We never totally did the family bed thing--now and then he'll have a little phase of sleeping in our bed all night, but usually I lie down with him after we read and stay until he's asleep (or longer if I've fallen asleep). If he wakes up in the night he usually comes in our bed but lately he's had a few nights where he's stayed in his bed and fallen back to sleep. So he is becoming more comfortable with that, but only just recently.

Even when his cousins were staying with us last summer and sleeping in his room he still wanted me in there while he fell asleep. He definitely wouldn't be ready for the camp situation.
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#40 of 59 Old 03-21-2010, 05:54 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Thanks everyone. We haven't really talked about it this weekend (she tends to forget about it when she's not in school and everyone is talking about it). On Friday, after school she mentioned something about it and I told her that I had talked to S., our next door neighbor and very good friend. S. said that over spring break, dd could spend the night in their spare room. I think this might be a good "test drive" for her. Dd thought it was a great idea and is looking forward to it. Of course, our neighbor is 50 yards away and camp is 4 or 5 hours away.

Dd just won't sleep anywhere other than our bed at home (not that she sleeps without us when we're on vacation or camping or visiting). What I mean is that when her cousins come over for a sleepover, they all pile into my mom's room to "camp" on the floor, and dd *never* stays. The lights go out, and she's leaving her cousins to sleep on Mom's floor while she's comfy and cozy up in our bed. She won't even sleep elsewhere when she has her cousins sleepover. I think it's a good idea to see how she does when she has to fall asleep alone in a friendly, but new place (our neighbor's). I think this will give us a good idea of how she might do.

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Even when his cousins were staying with us last summer and sleeping in his room he still wanted me in there while he fell asleep. He definitely wouldn't be ready for the camp situation.
Yeah, falling asleep is part of it. She still has to have someone there to fall asleep in addition to all of the other co-sleeping issues.

Man, I hope I'm not discouraging anyone from co-sleeping, because we really don't see this as an issue *at all* in normal, everyday life. It's just these one-off situations where it can confuse the issues and cause problems. We're fine with co-sleeping, still... just thought at 4yo, 5yoyo, 6, 7yo... each year that dd would finally get over that hurdle and sleep in her own bed. Maybe it's our fault because we don't push her about this. It feels right, though as part of our commitment to GD.
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#41 of 59 Old 03-21-2010, 08:46 PM
 
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Man, I hope I'm not discouraging anyone from co-sleeping, because we really don't see this as an issue *at all* in normal, everyday life. It's just these one-off situations where it can confuse the issues and cause problems. We're fine with co-sleeping, still... just thought at 4yo, 5yoyo, 6, 7yo... each year that dd would finally get over that hurdle and sleep in her own bed. Maybe it's our fault because we don't push her about this. It feels right, though as part of our commitment to GD.
Our DD is 5.5yo and I also never expected to be co-sleeping this long (and never expected to co-sleep when she was a baby). But here we are, doing what feels right, right now. One day (I should say night), your DD will be ready to be all on her own and ready for sleepovers.

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#42 of 59 Old 03-22-2010, 07:50 AM - Thread Starter
 
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GuildJen - I forgot to thank you for your suggestions. I have jotted them down and will ask about them at the next informational session we have.
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#43 of 59 Old 03-22-2010, 01:52 PM
 
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Man, I hope I'm not discouraging anyone from co-sleeping, because we really don't see this as an issue *at all* in normal, everyday life.
To be honest, I'm glad my co-sleeping days are done. If I was a newly pregnant woman, or toward the end, when 3yo ds was still coming into our bed (only for another month, but I didn't know that), I'd be kind of freaking out, reading this.
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#44 of 59 Old 03-22-2010, 05:32 PM
 
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Thank you. I agree. I'm fine with her going if she is comfortable with it. Actually, it would be nice if they offered a day camp first.

It's hard for people to relate when it's such a foreign concept... co-sleeping at 8... and I realize that. It may be so unique that the only thing I can do is just not ask for outside advice from people who have never been in that situation and try my best to do what we can.

I don't think the responses here are necessarily due to people's not understanding the issue. Some may be, but I don't think it's useful to just dismiss them all on that basis.

FWIW, my daughter is almost nine and still co-sleeps. She has not once spent a night in her own bed. She has a few times slept with my mom instead. She has been on a few sleepovers, primarily with friends who have parents who will lie down with the kids to go to sleep and stay in the room (so, she still had an adult she knew and trusted sleeping with her).

She also went to sleepaway camp last summer for a few nights. And was fine. Nervous, and lonely at times, esp the first night, but fine, and VERY happy she did it. She clearly really really wanted to go. If she'd had a choice to do all the daytime stuff and come sleep with me at night, I'm pretty sure she'd have gone for that. But, it wasn't a choice, any more than that's a choice for your daughter, so it sort of doesn't matter if that's what she'd prefer.

For my daughter, we spoke quite a bit about the pros and cons. The bottom line was that she really really wanted to go, and was also very scared abt going and what the nighttime would be like. I saw my job as helping her with that fear so she could do the thing she really really wanted to go, and we did that in a few different ways. It helped that it was an intro to camping program, so really all or almost all of the kids were also at camp for the first time, and the counselors were well prepared for that. Which my daughter knew. I would think the same would be true for your daughter's trip, that at that age, surely for many of them it'll be their first time away from home like that, and so it's not like your daughter will stand out in that way. Further, she will be with lots of people she knows, and even if the teacher in her cabin isn't her beloved teacher, surely she will be kind and comforting to scared little kids in her care, as will all the other people around.

So, I vote that you help her to be able to go. I don't think that's the same thing at all as forcing her to go (she wants to go, but is scared), or telling her to suck it up (you'll be helping her to deal with her fears). I think it's helping her do something she wants to do, something that is also an expectation of the school you chose to enroll her in, and something that will be a continued expectation if she stays there, so starting with everyone else seems much more helpful to me than working to get her out of it now, thus potentially making next year's trip even more daunting.
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#45 of 59 Old 03-24-2010, 03:02 PM
 
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.

I want dd to have a realistic expectation and be able to accept the trip on her own terms. I don't want to ruin it for future years, IYKWIM.
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#46 of 59 Old 03-24-2010, 03:12 PM
 
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velochic my dd is 7 and a sleeping velcro. when seh is with me she cosleeps, when seh is with her dad she forced him to cosleep.

however like pp said - because dd is so social and loves spending time with others she has happily slept away from me from when she was 6. we tried before and it didnt work. not even seperate bedrooms. she has been to sleepovers.

she was a little apprehensive about the camping trip as well as a trip to her cousins - being away from me for 10 days. she had never been away for more than 24 hours. i always explain to her that life is bittersweet. that you never get everything you want. that you get some and not the rest. she now believes that thru experience. at camp she was too tired to miss me and at her cousins she was having just too much fun and even cosleeping with her cousin to really feel sad or scared.

however at the same time one other little girl couldnt sleep in a tent away from her parents and had to go back there at night.

you know your dd. you know what she can do. i knew my dd could do it. she just needed to believe that she could. it may not be teh same thing in your case.

my dd is a v. touchy feely needy child. cosleeping is absolutely ESSENTIAL for her. its kinda her therapy. however she is also a party girl and she can party without me for short periods of time. she can give up her cosleeping part for a little while to be able to party.

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#47 of 59 Old 03-24-2010, 06:37 PM - Thread Starter
 
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the thing is you dont know. neither does your dd. until she tries it. it could be a breeze. it could be traumatic. you just dont know.

seriously i think the only way of knowing is by doing in her case. the what ifs you can talk about till the cows come home but you still wont have an answer.

the key is empowering your dd. i have a 7 year old with anxiety. i know what you are talking about.

dd has surprised me quite a bit where i thought no way would she be able to pull it off. i wouldnt try to sleep alone at home. the camp would be a completely different thing.

what i try and do with my dd - since everything is scary for her - i tell her yes its going to be perhaps scary, etc, BUT remember its only for so many hours. in many many cases this has really worked well for her. not to know what 'bad' to expect but the options in case she is scared. and later i always go over how she did it, or its ok if she couldnt. she could try it again later.

dd is really, really scared of the dark. one night while camping she chose to wait in the darn night as we went back to get batteries from the car parked 10 mins walk away. even today i tell her how surprised i was that she chose that option and that she figured out a way to keep the fear at bay.

is your dd willing to give it a try? if she is - then that is 90% of the battle won.
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velochic my dd is 7 and a sleeping velcro. when seh is with me she cosleeps, when seh is with her dad she forced him to cosleep.

however like pp said - because dd is so social and loves spending time with others she has happily slept away from me from when she was 6. we tried before and it didnt work. not even seperate bedrooms. she has been to sleepovers.

she was a little apprehensive about the camping trip as well as a trip to her cousins - being away from me for 10 days. she had never been away for more than 24 hours. i always explain to her that life is bittersweet. that you never get everything you want. that you get some and not the rest. she now believes that thru experience. at camp she was too tired to miss me and at her cousins she was having just too much fun and even cosleeping with her cousin to really feel sad or scared.

however at the same time one other little girl couldnt sleep in a tent away from her parents and had to go back there at night.

you know your dd. you know what she can do. i knew my dd could do it. she just needed to believe that she could. it may not be teh same thing in your case.

my dd is a v. touchy feely needy child. cosleeping is absolutely ESSENTIAL for her. its kinda her therapy. however she is also a party girl and she can party without me for short periods of time. she can give up her cosleeping part for a little while to be able to party.
I'm not sure why you're trying so hard to convince me about this. I've already said that if decides to go, great. I'm not going to hold her back, for sure (I want her to go). If not, I'm not going to force her. There have been some good suggestions from this thread that I'll employ but if they don't work, they don't work, and we'll try again next year.
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#48 of 59 Old 03-24-2010, 07:05 PM
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I think the point that she was trying to make is that plenty of die-hard co-sleepers actually do just fine doing stuff like camping trips (and plenty of kids who sleep alone struggle with camping trips). I also don't see it as a co-sleeping issue. My kid co-slept at 8 (and for years afterwards) but also had no trouble starting to do stuff like this at 7-8ish...

 
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#49 of 59 Old 03-24-2010, 08:27 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I also don't see it as a co-sleeping issue.
In dd's case it very much *is* a co-sleeping issue, though.
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#50 of 59 Old 03-25-2010, 01:57 AM
 
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I think the point that she was trying to make is that plenty of die-hard co-sleepers actually do just fine doing stuff like camping trips (and plenty of kids who sleep alone struggle with camping trips). I also don't see it as a co-sleeping issue. My kid co-slept at 8 (and for years afterwards) but also had no trouble starting to do stuff like this at 7-8ish...
I agree with this. I hope you get it all figured out. From your posts it sounds as though she wants to give this a try and I hope it's an enjoyable experience for her. Even if she's a little scared, I don't think it will scar her for life... Kids are much more resilient and can handle a lot more than we often give them credit for.
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#51 of 59 Old 03-25-2010, 04:26 AM
 
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As I am writing this, my co-sleeping 6yo is sprawled across the bed, and my co-sleeping 1yo is on my lap because she will not sleep except with human contact. So... the 8yo in bed seems lovely and nurturing to me.

The idea of encouraging resilience, it makes so much sense to me as an abstract idea, but when I think about my own parenting, and even my childhood, I keep coming back to trust. When I trust my children's instincts about what they are ready for, I usually don't have regrets. That's not to say I'm right, or they are always right--there have, in hindsight, been times I waited longer than I needed to. But it was fine to wait. Whereas when I felt driven by an outside timetable, when I pushed when I was uncertain... pretty much all my regrets are from times I didn't wait longer.

Like I said, the idea of giving her wings, I hear that, but for me trusting the child's pace has been even more powerful, and I wanted to pass along a little encouragement if that is what your mama heart is telling you.

Heather
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#52 of 59 Old 03-25-2010, 08:36 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Originally Posted by domesticidyll View Post
As I am writing this, my co-sleeping 6yo is sprawled across the bed, and my co-sleeping 1yo is on my lap because she will not sleep except with human contact. So... the 8yo in bed seems lovely and nurturing to me.

The idea of encouraging resilience, it makes so much sense to me as an abstract idea, but when I think about my own parenting, and even my childhood, I keep coming back to trust. When I trust my children's instincts about what they are ready for, I usually don't have regrets. That's not to say I'm right, or they are always right--there have, in hindsight, been times I waited longer than I needed to. But it was fine to wait. Whereas when I felt driven by an outside timetable, when I pushed when I was uncertain... pretty much all my regrets are from times I didn't wait longer.

Like I said, the idea of giving her wings, I hear that, but for me trusting the child's pace has been even more powerful, and I wanted to pass along a little encouragement if that is what your mama heart is telling you.

Heather
Thank you very much. This really rings true for me. You've worded it beautifully.
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#53 of 59 Old 03-25-2010, 09:49 AM
 
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Didn't have time to read the other replies, sorry.

I was about that age when I had to go on an overnight trip with Brownies. I didn't co-sleep but I was just not happy with the arrangement. They made food I didn't like and when I said I couldn't eat it the counselors "jokingly" made fun of me for the entire night about how spoiled I was (not to mention hungry). (Sorry, I grew up with non-American food, I didn't like American "kiddy" food!) I don't know how it's possible but everyone from the camp counselors to the other scouts (following their lead) were basically making fun of me the whole night; I didn't sleep at all. I felt so trapped because I couldn't go home then. All I wanted was to go home. I hated it and quit Brownies the next day. I didn't even want to go back to school for a long time. Was I scarred? No, but it sure wasn't a positive experience. I wasn't ready.

A few years later, I think we were 11 and in 6th grade, we had a weekend camping trip to go skiing and I had the biggest blast EVER, and so much fun. I even went to a sleepover or two in 5th grade and that was OK too. But in 2nd or 3rd grade (maybe it was even 4th, I honestly don't remember) I wasn't ready.

FWIW I also co-slept on and off until I was about 9-10 years old but that had nothing to do with when I was ready or not to overnight somewhere else. What it did have to do with was the feeling of being trapped in a place where I didn't want to be, overnight. I had looked forward to going, incidentally - it just wasn't like I expected it to be.

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#54 of 59 Old 03-30-2010, 10:41 PM
 
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In dd's case it very much *is* a co-sleeping issue, though.
Though perhaps you've already gotten enough feedback, in light of this, I think I'm going to hop this over to FBNP for additional thoughts.

 
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#55 of 59 Old 03-30-2010, 10:57 PM
 
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I only skimmed the replies so I might have missed this. Did you ask the teacher who will be with your DD how they handle kids who get homesick in the middle of the night? With a group of second graders that has to have come up before.

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#56 of 59 Old 04-01-2010, 09:57 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I wanted to post an update. (Cross-posted in Learning at School).

It's spring break. Our next door neighbors are very good friends. I asked if dd would be willing to spend the night over there to "test the waters". It's close and she loves these people. They are really great with dd.

In a nutshell... she did it. She slept in her own bed over there, in their spare room, no problems. I didn't push her at all and when it was time to go, she was excited, slept in as usual, and went to sleep on her own. She had a lot of fun. She said she has the confidence to go to camp now. As I mentioned, I thought that this would help her, and I was right.

We had talked about her spending the night with the neighbors for about a year and this school trip really gave her the incentive to try it. I think it has empowered her... even if she is a brave little daredevil.

Thanks to all of you who were helpful and supportive. We used many ideas offered here, so it was, indeed, helpful.
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#57 of 59 Old 04-02-2010, 08:15 AM
 
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Firstly, I totally understand your concerns! You know your child best and you can tell that though she wants to go, she is having some sort of apprehension.

I am a reading teacher to 1st, 2nd, and 3rd graders (2nd grade is my favorite to teach, btw). What I am anticipating is that MANY of the kids are going to have a hard time being away from family on the overnight - which is why the school is doing just one night to ease them in to the experience of foreign exchange later. Anyway, tons of these kids are going to be homesick - I will bet a million dollars on it. And I also bet the teachers are prepared for it and are expecting it too.

Additionally, as a PP said, the kids are either going to be wired and having a hard time sleeping for all their excitement and chatter, or they're going to be exhausted.

Minimizing homesickness with a short note that says "Sweet dreams! HAVE FUN! We will be there tomorrow to pick you up and give you a big hug!" or something like that might help, as would a lovey from home or even a pillowcase, etc.

Finally, as I advise everyone, TALK TO THE TEACHER and tell her about your worries! Teachers LOVE to be "on the same team" as mom and dad and she'll apppreciate you giving her the head's up so that she can be on the lookout for DD's signs of anxiety and mitigate.
If it makes you feel any better (or might make it worse), many kids have a hard time at school during the normal school day. I've had kids cry to me that they miss Mom or sister, etc. As a teacher I ask if they need a hug, I reassure them it'll be okay and that its normal to miss family, and then I distract, distract, distract and amp up my "performance" to make school extra fun for that kid. By the end of they day they've totally forgotten that they were homesick.
GOOD LUCK!!!
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#58 of 59 Old 04-02-2010, 01:09 PM
 
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Yay, velochic! So glad your DD was able to do her 'test drive'! I wish her all the best for the real thing.

thalia loves Jesus and DH wordyeight and DD#1 : 8/2007 and DD#2 9/2010
and remembering: little turtle 5/23/2006 and poppyseed 7/15/2009
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#59 of 59 Old 04-02-2010, 10:57 PM
 
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That's awesome! I'm sure she'll be much more confident about the camp out now! Congrats Velochic and DD!

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