Valuing education: Do you or don't you? - Page 2 - Mothering Forums

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#31 of 51 Old 05-08-2010, 10:47 AM
 
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Access to a free education is invaluable. Certainly there are some serious flaws with the current system but the institution isn't entirely to blame. I wouldn't even say it's largely to blame. We can't see failure in our schools without recognizing the dramatic changes in community and parenting trends. The general lack of respect and feelings of entitlement poisen the classrooms of even the best of teachers. I'm sorry but public school can't take credit for this. This started at home.
This. Can't stress enough how schools have less power than parents. Without good parents (whatever that may be) schools can only do so much to educate our nation's children. Once parents start taking on their share of educating their children we as a society will be much better off.

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#32 of 51 Old 05-08-2010, 11:18 AM
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This. Can't stress enough how schools have less power than parents. Without good parents (whatever that may be) schools can only do so much to educate our nation's children. Once parents start taking on their share of educating their children we as a society will be much better off.
Very true, but I think a trend started decades ago that will be hard to repair. Parents, even good ones, have been made to feel that education is "the school's job." My own mother was heavily chastised by my teacher because I showed up at Kindergarten already knowing how to read and write. This was in the 70's. Kids who are too far ahead are a "problem" of sorts in the classroom; the teachers have to work harder to challenge those kids. Kids who are behind the average get special help from special teachers. There are often no programs for kids who are "ahead," or those programs only start in the upper grades and often aren't a daily occurrence.

Because of the way schools work, it's much more convenient for teachers and administrators if every child in the same grade has the same level of skills. And parents who educate their own children in subjects other than the 3 R's will face the problem of teaching things differently than the schools would, which would lead to *gasp* questioning. My version of History is far different than the watered-down version in a textbook. And I know from experience that kids who ask too many questions in school are seen as disruptive.

So....if parents are ultimately responsible for their child's education, as you say, I feel it's a lot easier just to take care of it all on our own terms and avoid the hassle of school altogether. Because....whether my child attends school or not, if he fails, I will be held accountable.
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#33 of 51 Old 05-08-2010, 11:31 AM
 
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I say this as gently as possible, but this demonstrates how much we have a culture have "bought into the system". Even those who profess to have "rejected the system" still use it as a given. "Grade levels" are not sent by G-d. They are a constructed reality based on averages of averages with some "we think this is good" sprinkled on top. As a structure, they are based on a "manufacturing" system that arose along with our industrual revolution to cope with all the children of booming cities who needed schools. Like a car goes down the assembly line, a child who "stops at each grade" has all that is in that "grade" poured into them and at the end... voila! A complete car! Er, education! When you see that grade levels are just what we have come up with to try to educate huge numbers of children, you see that grade skipping is not really anything big. Why assume that all children work at the same pace in all subjects because of age? It is a baseline. And that baseline does not fit everyone.

And yes, issues with depth of knowledge is an issue. However, people learn in "waves". True depth of understanding of ideas takes time. Also, different parts of the brain learn skills at different paces and levels. The brain is not finished growing and hashing out decision making skills and high level depth of understanding and emotional maturity until the mid-20's. Until then, things come in peices. The fact that a child might have good reading skills but not excellent comprehension only means that peice has not come yet. It does not diminish the accomplishments they DO have nor necessarily indicate a deficit. It means that the puzzle is still in progress. Things like "Reading" are complex; made up of many moving parts. The idea that they are not all yet in the same level is not hard to imagine.

Additionally (and I say this as gently as possible) "trusting that with love and guidance their sprit will find their way" is reflective of priveledge. I cannot imagine an African American mother in the south Bronx whose child has a 50/50 rate of graduation, whose teachers are all subs or 1st year, whose building is crumbling and upon graduation finds they are not prepared for other choices and do not have access or resources in "finding their way". We who experience priveldge can afford to release some of these ideas and trust because the system is set up to return that priveledge. Those who do not take enormous risks with loosing odds when they "trust" that somehow their children will "find their way".
Yes. Oh yes.
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#34 of 51 Old 05-08-2010, 02:45 PM
 
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Because of the way schools work, it's much more convenient for teachers and administrators if every child in the same grade has the same level of skills. And parents who educate their own children in subjects other than the 3 R's will face the problem of teaching things differently than the schools would, which would lead to *gasp* questioning.
My kids attend a wonderful public school that realizes that kids of the same grade are all over the place in terms of levels and provides a lot of differentation.

We used to homeschool, and at this point find it is better for the kids to be in school. They get interested in things because other kids are interested in them, they learn about things that they wouldn't have thought they were interested in until they *had* to do it, etc. It's working well.

We are moving over the summer to a city with an alternative school (no grades, no tests, a green house and an aminal center, etc) and both kids will go there. We are excited about this new option, which we feel will provide a bit of the best of both worlds.

As far as the social aspect, both my kids do better seeing the same group of kids every day, and my child who likes lots of activities enjoys being in the same acitivities with kids she knows. We were never able to create that in years of homeschooling.

There really are pros and cons in any educational choice.

but everything has pros and cons  shrug.gif

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#35 of 51 Old 05-08-2010, 07:34 PM
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My kids attend a wonderful public school that realizes that kids of the same grade are all over the place in terms of levels and provides a lot of differentation.
That's great. When ALL public schools do this, then I might concede that schools are great places to be. This happened neither at my schools, my DH's schools, nor my son's schools. All in different cities and different states.

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We used to homeschool, and at this point find it is better for the kids to be in school. They get interested in things because other kids are interested in them, they learn about things that they wouldn't have thought they were interested in until they *had* to do it, etc.
Wherever you spend time, you'll be missing out on things that happen elsewhere. Yes, your children are having different experiences at school than they would at home. I don't know if I would say that's necessarily "better." It's just....different. If your 7yo is learning about the life cycle of a caterpillar, and my 7yo is learning about rocks and minerals, who is to say that either is better or worse?

My kids get interested in things because they look for stuff to be interested in. Sometimes they pick things up from their friends, but mostly they're just curious people.

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As far as the social aspect, both my kids do better seeing the same group of kids every day, and my child who likes lots of activities enjoys being in the same acitivities with kids she knows. We were never able to create that in years of homeschooling.
Neither of my kids see other kids every day, and they're okay with that. I don't like to be around people every single day, either. DS1 has not been in school since 2nd grade, and he was doing okay there.....but I highly suspect that the social environment at our local high school would seem tedious to him, at best. DS2 would probably thrive socially at school, but has no interest in going. It's been their choice for years. They have friends who go to public school and private school, and hear enough to know they don't really care to be there.

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There really are pros and cons in any educational choice.
Yup. I don't separate education from just living. There are ups and downs in all walks of life.
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#36 of 51 Old 05-08-2010, 09:29 PM
 
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Okay, so I've already mentioned my community and its gifted program obsessed parents. These parents are very much into their gifted program, but they are also fixated on education in general. The other parents I know who haven't told me their kids are gifted are also similarly obsessed with the educational system. These people seem to know as much about the school as the people who work there.

Paradoxically, they want their children to be as advanced as they can be, but then they complain about it too and worry that their children will be bored. None of these parents have children who are below average or even average. I volunteer in the school and I know most of the kids are average, but the parents don't think so. Why the need for the self deception?

On a recent conversation I had with my neighbor she said with hyper anxiety in her voice, "well, isn't education everything? If a child doesn't have education what do they have??"

And then I started reflecting on this. Do I value education less than these people? And then I realized that I did which was very revealing. I do value intelligence and self education, but I don't value the educational system. I don't think it has any great power to make my kids Einsteins or ruin them or whatever. I think as long at it is average or above your kids are going to be what they are going to be. In a way I feel more free than these other people because I believe that a person's spirit with love and guidance will find its way.
While I don't think education is everything, I absoutely value it highly. IMO, education is a big deal, both in terms of a formal recognition of education being an important tool in taking people places in life, and education simply for the sake of education. IMO, no knowledge is wasted. Even if you never use something you have learned, by having learned it, you always have it there to use should you ever need OR choose to use it.

Having said that, I don't think any one particular educational SYSTEM has more value over another, provided it works. By this I mean, for some kids, our public school system offers a lot and has a great deal of value. For other kids, a particular private school or charter school has more value. For others still, a homeschool co-op might be best, and for others a self directed pace of unschooling might be the best approach. At the same time, there are educators who fail their students in ALL systems. There are parents who say they "unschool" but are really doing nothing in the edcation department at all. There are public schools that are so focused on providing samples of high test scores that the actual educating of children falls by the wayside. There are private schools that are so focused on ONE area of education, such as religion (only one example) that they miss out on providing real opportunity in other areas.

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The general idea is this: education is a gateway. And what it does is provide choices and opportunity. A "poorly educated person" or someone without the opportunity to become educated has very few choices to become who they want to be. They do not have exposure to ideas, they do not have access to advancement in their chosen interests, they are not able to fully participate in our society.

There is a reason why establishing schools is always high on the list of national priorities when countries emerge from crisis, from Afghanistan to Haiti. People will hold school under trees in refugee camps, in huts and in fields. They scratch letters in the dirt. They all gather around a single book. In "Three Cups of Tea", Greg Mortenson describes in heart breaking detail how a small villiage in Pakistan wanted a school above all else. Go back in time and the Greeks and Romans had schools thouands of years ago. More recently, American slaves risked all and died in their quest for education and literacy. In every remote village you will find a system of introducing children to what we know about the world. The concept of education is universal. The way it is done can be very diverse and it can take many forms. And that educational diversity deserves to be honored and appreciated. Not "liking" one school or even one system does not mean that education as a concept does not have value.

Is education "everything"? Surely not. But it does mean security, access, opportunity, and influence. How and where those are chosen to be applied is up to the individual. But without a way to learn how the world works, understand some of what is known, and aquire the skills to navigate through it (education!) those things are not so easy.

People look at their children and they want them to have a full life. The reality is the further you drop on the "well educated scale", the fewer opportunities there are. Parents know this, even if they do not verbalize it in this way. They also know that the larger social systems at work will take their toll as well. Racism, sexism, classism, etc. and they work to preserve the opportunities their children will have by trying to ensure that they will not be limited by education. I don't blame them. They are grappling with large public systems that are complex and heavy with ins-and-outs and the reality is that gifted students are often percieved as having the most opportunities at the end of the day. Instead of looking down on parents who are responding to a system of funnels that our schools usually create, fight the bigger issues and systems that preserve the values that reinforce the haves and have-nots.

OK. I confess. I'm getting a PhD in education so I am biased .
I totally agree with all of this. I am not at a PhD level (isn't it now an EdD?) in education, but that is where my BS lies. So perhaps I am biased too. But I 100% agree with you.

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Wherever you spend time, you'll be missing out on things that happen elsewhere. Yes, your children are having different experiences at school than they would at home. I don't know if I would say that's necessarily "better." It's just....different. If your 7yo is learning about the life cycle of a caterpillar, and my 7yo is learning about rocks and minerals, who is to say that either is better or worse?.
I think the point isn't that becoming interested in one or the other is better or worse. I think the idea is that if your 7 yr old is interested in rocks and her 7 yr old is interested in the life cycle of the caterpillar, then perhaps by interacting with each other, suddenly both children are interested in both things. And that, IMO, IS better, only because I think learning about more things is better. Even if your child never finds a use for the life cycle of the caterpillar because he grows up to be a vulcanologist, simply knowing it is valuable to me. Now, don't misunderstand, I am not saying your 7 yr old wouldn't become interested in caterpillars otherwise, just that the exposure to someone else's interests can spark additional interests in an individual.
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#37 of 51 Old 05-09-2010, 01:07 AM
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Now, don't misunderstand, I am not saying your 7 yr old wouldn't become interested in caterpillars otherwise, just that the exposure to someone else's interests can spark additional interests in an individual.
Most homeschooled kids are not sequestered away from other people. You don't have to spend your days in a classroom to be exposed to someone else's interests.

I'm really not wanting to turn this into a homeschool vs. school debate. The thread is about whether we value education. I do. I just don't think that school necessarily = education. The people in the OP's post value school and its programs, and equate that with education. It's just not a path we choose for ourselves, and I don't think there's anything wrong with educating oneself on one's own terms, and being the judge of one's own learning and work.
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#38 of 51 Old 05-09-2010, 01:40 AM
 
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I value education like I value health. Meaning ... immensely.

However, do I personally want to have anything to do with the public institutions of health care a.k.a. hospitals? No, I hope not to. I want to stay healthy and look after myself outside of the confines of a hospital. Just like I hope to have little to do with the public institutions of education, helping my children be bright, well-educated people outside the confines of a school. I'm glad both sets of institutions are there -- some people need them, some people choose them, and someday something might lead me to need them too. So I very much support the presence of humane, responsible public institutions in both arenas. But I would rather not be using them myself.

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#39 of 51 Old 05-09-2010, 07:38 AM
 
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This. Can't stress enough how schools have less power than parents. Without good parents (whatever that may be) schools can only do so much to educate our nation's children. Once parents start taking on their share of educating their children we as a society will be much better off.
I have thought about this a lot over the past couple years. Whenever a public school receives a failing report, the principal is replaced, and/or the teachers are replaced, and/or the school receives more funding for improvements. However, this often seems to be missing the point - that valuing education starts at home, not at school. If the parent doesn't value education, then the student is less likely to value education. However, what can be done to change parental attitudes? Beyond mandatory school attendance, we can't really legislate parental behavior or attitudes. I definitely think more could be done in terms of parental outreach, though.

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Parents, even good ones, have been made to feel that education is "the school's job." My own mother was heavily chastised by my teacher because I showed up at Kindergarten already knowing how to read and write. This was in the 70's. Kids who are too far ahead are a "problem" of sorts in the classroom; the teachers have to work harder to challenge those kids. Kids who are behind the average get special help from special teachers. There are often no programs for kids who are "ahead," or those programs only start in the upper grades and often aren't a daily occurrence.
Unless the school has adequate resources or the teacher is very experienced with differentiation and is willing to differentiate, the child who is very much ahead is often left alone while the teacher tries to catch everyone else up. The ones who "act out" and seek attention b/c they are left to themselves and have nothing challenging to do after finishing "seat work" before everyone else end up being the "problem."
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#40 of 51 Old 05-09-2010, 10:12 AM
 
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I value formal education a lot.
Maybe I'm biased because I ended up getting a PhD and working in a University environment for 15 years (so in the Highest Temple of Education).

Although I didn't teach myself, I hate teaching, I am terrible at it!! I was solely a researcher.

So I do want DC to get the point of formal academic education, they don't have to be the best at it, but I want them to believe that it has value and relevance to their lives.

Nevertheless, I feel uncomfortable with the glib summary statement that OP used to start this thread, as though a child truly was "nothing" without an education -- but such a child would be hugely disadvantaged, imho, unless they had some other fantastic and unusual talents (perhaps).

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#41 of 51 Old 05-09-2010, 10:33 AM
 
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I value education like I value health. Meaning ... immensely.

However, do I personally want to have anything to do with the public institutions of health care a.k.a. hospitals? No, I hope not to. I want to stay healthy and look after myself outside of the confines of a hospital. Just like I hope to have little to do with the public institutions of education, helping my children be bright, well-educated people outside the confines of a school. I'm glad both sets of institutions are there -- some people need them, some people choose them, and someday something might lead me to need them too. So I very much support the presence of humane, responsible public institutions in both arenas. But I would rather not be using them myself.

Miranda
I was going to post but now I do not need to......

The only slight change I would make for my own purposes is I would use the word "school" in place of education.

"Education" is too broad a term for my liking.
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#42 of 51 Old 05-09-2010, 10:39 AM
 
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I value education, but think that school often gets in the way of it.

I love the saying, "We worry about what a child will become tomorrow, yet we forget that he is someone today."


This is exactly our thinking!! I keep here about the reasoning for all day everyday kindergarten being that it will help him read earlier in grade one and therefore perform better in highschool and get into better universities and have better jobs.....I mean you just wrote off 20y of this child's life!

WE are contemplating homeschooling (the Montessori here only goes to age 6) because we don't necessarily believe in the school system.

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#43 of 51 Old 05-09-2010, 02:01 PM
 
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I have mixed feelings about the whole thing. I very much see the value in education but I don't think that needs to take place in a school setting (and in many cases is better when it is not in a school setting). DD is still not in school yet but we're definitely looking into some sort of child-led education whether that be unschooling at home, a free/democratic/Sudbury schools, or a Montessori school. It depends on where we live and what options are available to us. I shudder at the thought of an age dependent curriculum for her and, well, for any kids I have regardless of level of giftedness. I just don't think that's the right approach.

That being said. I have doubts if that's right for everybody. DH and I are both overly education (DH has is Ph.D and may become a professor soon and I just need to do my defense for mine). So, clearly, higher education is important to us. For me it's not so much that I would be disappointed if DD didn't go on to get a degree but more that I know most career paths require degrees (and many for a very good reason). I really want her to do something she's absolutely passionate about and if that doesn't require a degree and she can support herself with that GREAT. But, that's not always the easiest road to take, especially since people tend to take you more seriously when you hold that special piece of paper in your hand.


Going back to my thoughts on school (pre-college), I wonder, though, about students where the parents don't put a lot of emphasis on education/learning etc. Like parents that never read, take their children to the library etc. I tend to think that an unschooling (or free schools etc, I'm using the term loosely here) approach wouldn't work nearly as well for them since one of the big things I see as a motivation for learning in an unschooling environment is to emulate those around you. If your family doesn't read why should you learn to? Clearly the current system isn't working well but what would work instead? DH insists that unschooling only works for "smart" kids or at least for kids that have parents that emulate a continued learning environment... I definitely see his point but do wonder about it...
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#44 of 51 Old 05-09-2010, 03:00 PM
 
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Going back to my thoughts on school (pre-college), I wonder, though, about students where the parents don't put a lot of emphasis on education/learning etc. Like parents that never read, take their children to the library etc. I tend to think that an unschooling (or free schools etc, I'm using the term loosely here) approach wouldn't work nearly as well for them since one of the big things I see as a motivation for learning in an unschooling environment is to emulate those around you. If your family doesn't read why should you learn to? Clearly the current system isn't working well but what would work instead? DH insists that unschooling only works for "smart" kids or at least for kids that have parents that emulate a continued learning environment... I definitely see his point but do wonder about it...
I think that kids are naturally inclined to explore the world around them, and they do it very well unless someone gets in their way. Certainly a child can't learn in a vacuum, but most kids, even kids from non-academically-minded families, are exposed to enough of the world that they can decide for themselves what they are interested in learning more about. Maybe some kids might choose not to learn a lot of the standard public school curriculum, but I just don't see the problem with that. If they aren't interested, they're not going to remember it anyway (and even if they do remember, there won't be any benefit to the knowledge). What is taught in schools is largely arbitrary (and often incorrect) anyway.

Now, of course, there are kids who are raised in anti-academic and/or abusive environments, and that does make it harder. My mother was ridiculed for reading and wasting paper on artwork as a child. She still grew up loving to read and paint, and those are still two of her passions. The strict Catholic school she went to didn't help much with that, but I'm sure it was better than unschooling would have been, because at least it got her away from her abusive parents and gave her access to a (very limited) library. Of course, her parents couldn't have unschooled her, because they were constantly making judgments about what she learned and how she spent her time. In other words, even if she had stayed home from school, it wouldn't have been "unschooling."
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#45 of 51 Old 05-09-2010, 03:10 PM
 
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Most homeschooled kids are not sequestered away from other people. You don't have to spend your days in a classroom to be exposed to someone else's interests.

I'm really not wanting to turn this into a homeschool vs. school debate. The thread is about whether we value education. I do. I just don't think that school necessarily = education. The people in the OP's post value school and its programs, and equate that with education. It's just not a path we choose for ourselves, and I don't think there's anything wrong with educating oneself on one's own terms, and being the judge of one's own learning and work.
I am not saying that homeschool kids are squestered. Someone posted that school has been good for her kids because they have become interested in things they wouldn't have otherwise because of the social interaction of that school. And someone else responded saying that it wasn't better if one child had one interest and a second child had a different interest. All I was saying that being interested in both is better and if that happens to come from school then thats fine. In the context of the original post about school having been better for that poster's child, the social interactions of school have been better for them.

My brother homeschools his stepdaughter. She also attends a charter school/co-op sort of situation two days a week. And while I had my doubts about my brother's ability to homeschool, so far, she seems to be doing ok. And, as I originally posted, when a particular system WORKS, I am not going to say that one particular system is better or worse than another. That was not what my post was about. I am sorry if you thought I was saying that formal schooling was automatically better because there are other kids there. That's certainly not what I was saying. All I was saying was sharing interests among other kids is better than than not.
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#46 of 51 Old 05-09-2010, 03:54 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I think what I'm seeing among parents today is that there seems to be excessive idealism and I think this is related to OP and the over importance that is being placed on education. I think this is why you have all these parents who feel the need to remove their kids from what they think is a substandard educational system. They want to try different approaches, some very costly and risky IMO. And if they want to that's their choice, but I think it is more about them (the parents) and their idealism about what education should be than what is truly best for the children. It's one thing if you live in an area where the schools are very poor, but I see the exact same trend where I live where there happens to be a highly rated school system with an advanced curriculum.

The trend it seems is for parents to lament their own childhood and their educational experience, to believe that they were just too smart for the curriculum and the teachers. Nobody it seems had a good experience...But nobody seems to question the validity of this and it reminds me of the post Freudian culture whereby everyone blamed their mother for all their woes. I think people almost need something to be angry at and for right now it's the schools. The fact of the matter is that all schools whether you homeschool, go private or public, etc., all are going to be imperfect. Imperfect children are being taught from people who are imperfect and from books which are imperfect. People just need to accept that.
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#47 of 51 Old 05-09-2010, 04:18 PM
 
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I think that one of the most important things we can do as parents is to think about our own experiences and try to improve on how our parents did things.
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#48 of 51 Old 05-09-2010, 05:56 PM
 
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Originally Posted by happysmileylady View Post
All I was saying that being interested in both is better and if that happens to come from school then thats fine. In the context of the original post about school having been better for that poster's child, the social interactions of school have been better for them.

...And, as I originally posted, when a particular system WORKS, I am not going to say that one particular system is better or worse than another.
Agreed.

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Originally Posted by connieculkins View Post
I think what I'm seeing among parents today is that there seems to be excessive idealism and I think this is related to OP and the over importance that is being placed on education. I think this is why you have all these parents who feel the need to remove their kids from what they think is a substandard educational system.
agreed. Some parents really are more wrapped up in their ideals than in what is actually going on with their kids. And some parents are so wrapped up in their kids "education" (be it at home or at school) that whether or not the child is happy and has friends really takes a back seat.

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I think that one of the most important things we can do as parents is to think about our own experiences and try to improve on how our parents did things.
I used to think that when my kids were babies. Now I don't. The difference is that I know my kids better so I can parent them based on THEM instead of based on what I think might have worked better for me.

My kids are very different from each other, and they both different from me. The options we have as a family are different than the options I had growing up. If I was still wrapped up in what went wrong with my childhood, I'd be living in the past not the present.

but everything has pros and cons  shrug.gif

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#49 of 51 Old 05-09-2010, 09:23 PM
 
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I totally agree with all of this. I am not at a PhD level (isn't it now an EdD?) in education, but that is where my BS lies. So perhaps I am biased too.
EdD's are for people who become high level administrators (principals, superintendents, people who do special trainings or workshops, start schools, etc.). PhD's are for people who do educational research and write text books and curriculum and stuff.

There is some crossover, but that is the general distinction.
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#50 of 51 Old 05-09-2010, 09:33 PM
 
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I do value education. Culture is one of the things that separates us from the animals. BUT

"well, isn't education everything? If a child doesn't have education what do they have??"

I don't feel like this at all. I don't think that being well educated or gifted makes one a good person. I think that each of us has a part inside us that is divine, and our ability to be in touch with that in ourselves and to see it in others is what really matters. I'm not religious. I never go to church or anything like that.

Namasta means "I can see that place in you that is of love, of light and of truth, and when you are in the place in you and I am in that place in me, we are the same. "

That's what I want for my kids. Some one can be brilliant and well educated and use it to harm. I think that whatever is going on intellectually needs to be grounded in an understanding of what it means to be fully human.
I love your take on things. I am going to bed know with your words in my head.
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#51 of 51 Old 05-09-2010, 10:19 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Linda on the move View Post
I used to think that when my kids were babies. Now I don't. The difference is that I know my kids better so I can parent them based on THEM instead of based on what I think might have worked better for me.

My kids are very different from each other, and they both different from me. The options we have as a family are different than the options I had growing up. If I was still wrapped up in what went wrong with my childhood, I'd be living in the past not the present.
I'm certainly not advocating blind reaction to our experiences. I'm advocating rational examination of our past circumstances, followed by reasonable application of what we've learned to our present circumstances. In other words, I think that each generation of parents should make new mistakes, rather than thoughtlessly repeating the mistakes of each previous generation.

I am well aware that my DD is not me or my DH. But I am also aware that she has many of the same traits that made public school education an absolute failure for both of us. I would have to be crazy to simply send her off to school and hope for the best given what I know and what I have experienced. She has very significant needs that would not be met in a regular classroom without very significant accommodations. I don't see why I should pack her off to school when her needs can be met much more easily and with much less expense right here at home.
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