Gifted kids post-schooling - Page 2 - Mothering Forums

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Old 07-03-2010, 02:38 PM
A&A
 
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Originally Posted by mambera View Post
Well, if it were so obvious to parents exactly what their children needed, this board would be a whole lot emptier, wouldn't you think?
Personally I know exactly what my kids need, at least intellectually. Figuring out how to get society to accept and accommodate them is what I find difficult.

"Our task is not to see the future, but to enable it."
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Old 07-20-2010, 11:30 AM
 
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A little input with personal experience.

My "giftedness" gave me a nearly perfect ACT score that allowed me a very high scholarship to a prestigious art school. I found that part of adapting to the real world was creating my own challenges (no longer depending on the school/teachers to provide them for me). Being an artist provides an outlet for conceptual thinking, and a way to introduce those thoughts to others. I jump at any chances to further my education and challenge my talents--I took up the offer to work with an artist in residence and currently have work in an international exhibit.

My genius older sister, whose interests fall more into academia, is currently seeking her PhD. She will finish her thesis in two years. She is 26. I am 21.

Whether or not those things make us richer financially is up for debate. We are more motivated to accept challenges that could result in better jobs or paying opportunities, certainly. But what I see for the two of us is a continued search for knowledge.

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Old 07-20-2010, 03:35 PM
 
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I am really most concerned with what happens to a child long-term who isn't advanced by grade skipping but who continues with their peers. The Times article talked about kids who skipped 3 grades or more, which is surely an extreme end of the bell curve. My kids are bright/gifted [??] but not to that extent.

I am wondering if not advocating for these moderately gifted kids is setting them up for failure later in life. I struggle with the notion that I should be pushing for them to be further challenged at school because whilst they are bright [and this is demonstrated throught their grades] I don't think that socially it would be beneficial to be grade-skipped.
I agree with those who say that it depends on the child. If your children are happy in their current environment, then it's likely fine for them. If they're unhappy, then it's time to consider a change.

One problem they may encounter is not learning how to work hard, because they are not given challenging work. At some point in their lives, they will encounter work that is difficult, and this may cause them to experience a self-confidence crisis.

Another issue they may encounter is social isolation. Gifted children often feel disconnected from their age-mates, and benefit from social contact with other gifted children.

Sonja , 40, married to DH (42) since 5-29-93, DD born 11-3-2004, DS born 1-18-2007.
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Old 07-21-2010, 10:20 AM
 
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Hi

I am really most concerned with what happens to a child long-term who isn't advanced by grade skipping but who continues with their peers. The Times article talked about kids who skipped 3 grades or more, which is surely an extreme end of the bell curve. My kids are bright/gifted [??] but not to that extent.

I am wondering if not advocating for these moderately gifted kids is setting them up for failure later in life. I struggle with the notion that I should be pushing for them to be further challenged at school because whilst they are bright [and this is demonstrated throught their grades] I don't think that socially it would be beneficial to be grade-skipped.

Thanks
You may find this opinion piece interesting:
http://www.wku.edu/academy/?p=430
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