aspergers vs gifted signs in toddler - Page 2 - Mothering Forums

Forum Jump: 
Reply
 
Thread Tools
#31 of 36 Old 10-08-2010, 12:49 AM
 
LynnS6's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Pacific NW longing for the Midwest
Posts: 12,565
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I also wanted to mention that some kids are just 'late bloomers' socially speaking. That's one of the reasons that it's hard to diagnose Aspergers Syndrome in some kids until they're 8 or 9. If I go through the checklist posted, ds has a couple of the characteristics of AS for memory/attention, none for language, a couple for the social/emotional, a few of the behavior, and 2 of the 3 motor skills characteristics.

2 years ago, I would have said that he had many more of the characteristics. He was very late to develop conversational skills with people outside the family (though not inside the family), and he's quite reserved emotionally. He was late to develop emotional awareness and the ability to identify emotions. He was late to develop interest in group activities.

For him, it's a combination of his sensory issues and introverted personality. After he learned to regulate sensory input a little better (thanks to OT) and simply matured more, he's been able to acquire these skills.

But my point is that there are many things going on: developmental, sometimes a bit of delay and then disorder. That's why reading lists of characteristics is a bit dangerous. Yes, people with AS are very literal, but then so are young children. The difference is that individuals with AS don't outgrow it naturally.


Quote:
Originally Posted by ellemenope View Post
The most troublesome are the feeding issues and anxiety. We are in the process of getting a new pediatrician and will press these items again soon. I have read the HSC and skimmed out-of-sinc, but they seemed geared for older kids. I could only glean a few things that were practical at this point.
My favorite book for sensory issues is: Sensational Kids. I find it's more practical than the Out of Sync Child. Another one you might look at is called 'Just Take a Bite' is for kids with feeding issues. It sounds like your dd might well have some sensory issues and it will take some time to figure out of she outgrows them or needs a bit of help.

Lynnteapot2.GIF, academicreading.gif,geek.gif wife, WOHM  to T jog.gif(4/01) and M whistling.gif (5/04)
LynnS6 is offline  
#32 of 36 Old 10-08-2010, 03:11 AM
 
carmel23's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Pacific Northwest
Posts: 5,218
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Isn't Asperger's folded into the ASD in the new DSM?

I think it is very much a spectrum. I've accepted that with some kids, they are sometimes on and sometimes off of this spectrum. We happen to have a lot of friends in the ASD community, and I feel a great affinity towards this community. We have a lot in common, although my kid has never been formally diagnosed. He is like a hair over the line on the neurotypical side.

Some days I wish I had a better label then the G word, but then not much is certain in life, right?

 hh2.gif  ~~~~~~~~~~hh2.gif
 

carmel23 is offline  
#33 of 36 Old 10-08-2010, 04:05 AM
 
LynnS6's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Pacific NW longing for the Midwest
Posts: 12,565
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by carmel23 View Post
Isn't Asperger's folded into the ASD in the new DSM?
It is. As I understand it, Asperger's has always been considered on the autism spectrum. But then that's the whole point of a spectrum. Asperger's is close to the boundary between typical and atypical. Classical Autism is not.

I've got a kid who's close to the boundary between typical and atypical, it's just that he falls on the typical side. I doubted that for awhile, but the older he gets, the more I see that his 'deficits' were developmental. He was just a late bloomer for some of this stuff.

His cousin, on the other hand, falls on the other side (Asperger's). It's hard for my parents to see that my nephew doesn't 'just' need to grow up. He needs more intense help understanding the social stuff that my son is learning with just a little help.

Quote:
Originally Posted by carmel23 View Post
He is like a hair over the line on the neurotypical side.

Some days I wish I had a better label then the G word, but then not much is certain in life, right?
I understand! That's how I feel about my kid too. He's 'gifted', but it's more than that. And his differences aren't just his giftedness, because he's not as gifted as some of the kids I read about here. Moderately gifted, yes. Profoundly? No.

Lynnteapot2.GIF, academicreading.gif,geek.gif wife, WOHM  to T jog.gif(4/01) and M whistling.gif (5/04)
LynnS6 is offline  
#34 of 36 Old 10-08-2010, 06:40 AM
 
Tigerle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Europe
Posts: 1,386
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 16 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kristine233 View Post
When the coach asked "Mackie, what are you doing?" she responded with a lot of dramatic enthusiasm "These birds, you just wouldn't believe it!" Funniest dang response I've ever heard from a kid mid sporting event. LMAO.
Your daughter isn't called Luna Lovegood by any chance?

Quote:
"But if they ALL want to kick the ball, why don't they all get their own balls?"

There was really no explaining to her that it is FUN for a bunch of people to try to kick the same ball. Really not her idea of fun.

The only team she's ever been on was swim team, which was PERFECT for her. Great for her sensory issues, you get your own space, you do the same thing over and over, etc.
When Ds had soccer rules explained to him on occasion of the World Cup and I said tentatively "you can start soccer practice when you are a little older...?" (socially, if you are a male growing up in Europe it is such a big deal being able to join in a soccer game) he categorically refused! Much too complicated for him he insisted, with someone there specifically to make sure that NO ball enters the goal?!

Yeah, some NT kids just aren't cut out for teamsports. His father enjoyed biking and skiing and I imagine he'll like those too. I loved rowing (we live on a river but I just don't have the time) which I think is a good option for those kids when they are older. I am excited that swim class (officially water habituation but we'll sure sell it as swim class) will start soon and we hope to try him on skis this season, yay!

Mesleepytime.gifDH geek.gif DS1 10/06 drum.gif DD 08/10 notes.gifDS2 10/12babyf.gifwith SB ribbonyellow.gif and cat.gifcat.gif 
Tigerle is online now  
#35 of 36 Old 10-08-2010, 11:23 AM
 
loraxc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: In the Truffula Trees
Posts: 4,480
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
I've got a kid who's close to the boundary between typical and atypical, it's just that he falls on the typical side. I doubted that for awhile, but the older he gets, the more I see that his 'deficits' were developmental. He was just a late bloomer for some of this stuff.
Yes, similar for us. DD is just--well, she's asynchronous, no question.

Quote:
I think it is very much a spectrum. I've accepted that with some kids, they are sometimes on and sometimes off of this spectrum.
DD has certainly gone in and out of looking "spectrumy."

I guess it goes back to something I've been saying for a while, which is that I really think our understanding of the ASD-NT spectrum is completely in its infancy.

grateful mother to DD, 1/04, and DS, 2/08

loraxc is offline  
#36 of 36 Old 10-08-2010, 10:25 PM
 
joensally's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 2,977
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by dachshund mom View Post
Thanks, you've made me feel better. I'm not going to worry about it then because I guess it isn't something that needs early treatment if she does/will have it. I didn't mean any offense with the no emotion comment. It was on a lists of traits on some random non medical site. She rarely has any meltdowns unless very tired though.

I went back to the thread over there and it really went down hill after the autism comments and got shut down. I've learned my lesson to stay away from those other boards. Come back over here where people are not out to bring each other down all the time.
Just wanted to flag this - if a child does have autism, early(ier) intervention is important.

That said, I agree with other posters and it doesn't sound like there are real red flags with your dd at this point .

Mom to a teenager and a middle schooler.

joensally is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Drag and Drop File Upload
Drag files here to attach!
Upload Progress: 0
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Mothering Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off