Books for naive 10 yo reading at a high school level? - Page 2 - Mothering Forums

Forum Jump: 
Reply
 
Thread Tools
#31 of 54 Old 11-30-2010, 08:26 PM
 
cdahlgrd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 2,162
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

How about The Other Side Of the Mountain even though the character is a boy, it was always 1 of my favorites.  I loved Heidie and Bambie, too. 

 

Like so many other people, I also love, Anne of Avonlea and all the other books by that author!!  

 

I also just discovered there are a whole bunch of books about Laura Ingall's family members (Home to the Prairie, etc.). I have just started reading them and are so far very good!  They are aimed at about the same age group as the other books.

 

If you go to www.sonlight.com, there are lists of great books (mostly classics) by grade level. I have used those suggestions for my kids. They have great reviews of each book that detail any content that might be objectionable.


Courtney wife to geek.gif and mom to 4 boys: chicken3.gif   . I need caffix.gif !
They're not typos. . . I can't spell!
cdahlgrd is offline  
#32 of 54 Old 11-30-2010, 10:20 PM
 
pennyjane's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Bay Area
Posts: 1
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

I can't resist jumping in on this topic! I would recommend checking the Newbery lists for ideas. When I was that age, I loved The Westing Game, From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler, Bridge to Terabithia, etc. (to pick a few non-fantasy titles). There are lots of great books among the medal winners and honor books.

pennyjane is offline  
#33 of 54 Old 11-30-2010, 11:13 PM
 
Eeyore35's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 171
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Ok, so my parents were super strict, but by age 10 I could read as well as most adults, and I LOVED to read.

 

Some book I enjoyed around ages 9-12. Anything by Sam Cambell.(here is a link to my favourite http://books.google.ca/books?id=XNF2YluP1HYC&dq=%22sam+campbell%22&source=gbs_similarbooks_s&cad=1) The Incredible Journey. I LOVED Readers' Digest. i wasn't allowed to read the fiction feature, but sometimes i did anyway. That's where i discovered Ray Bradbury. I liked Animal Farm, and 1984. I read any animal stories, biographies of people i was interested in...I'd read anything that had any kind of story line, actually. Loved james herriott. Janette Oka has some kids books, but they are pretty easy to read. I like the stories, though. I also loved the Grandma's Attic series. I forget the author's name. You can check hte kids/young adult section of a christian bookstore.  Oh, I read a condensed version of Pilgrim's Progress arnd that age, altho that was defineilty not a fun light read! The same book that was in also had stories adapted fromartys Mirror...I'd say i was too young for that.

 

You mention your niece loves horses? usborne books has a series about riding stables. I bought one of them for my niece around that age...might be not enough of a challenge to read.

 

 

 

Eeyore35 is offline  
#34 of 54 Old 11-30-2010, 11:56 PM
 
Tigerle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Europe
Posts: 1,386
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 16 Post(s)


Quote:
Originally Posted by sapphire_chan View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by Thalia the Muse View Post

Some of the E. Nesbits are magic-free. There's The Railway Children, and the perfectly hilarious Bastable Family series -- starts with The Story of the Treasure Seekers, and continues with The Would-Be-Goods. I will say that Nesbit raises issues with racial stereotypes, class prejudice, and anti-Semitism. These are totally in keeping with cultural attitudes in England when the books were written, but unpleasant to come across now, and I don't remember how much they rear their heads in the Bastable books (I've never read Railway Children).

 

Class prejudice shows up in Railway Children, but it's in the form of people being extra nice to the family because the mom is a "real lady".

 

Around age 12, I couldn't read Watership Down because it was scary and tedious.
 



And in the form of a tremendous sense of entitlement on the part of the children! But it is nonetheless a very enjoyable book.

I too think Watership Down might be too emotionally intense for a ten-year-old. depspite being about bunnies, I think of it as a young-adult book. I also felt The Rats of NIMH to be rather scary. Even though the concentration camp allusion went clear over my head of course, I did pick up the emotional atmosphere (though I think I was much younger than ten when I read it).


Mesleepytime.gifDH geek.gif DS1 10/06 drum.gif DD 08/10 notes.gifDS2 10/12babyf.gifwith SB ribbonyellow.gif and cat.gifcat.gif 
Tigerle is online now  
#35 of 54 Old 12-01-2010, 05:55 AM
 
ollyoxenfree's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 4,933
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by wishin'&hopin' View Post

 

Wolves of Willoughby Chase (don't recall the author right now) was a hit with my 4-6th graders (all of whom are "gifted") and for Christmas they are reading The Best Christmas Pageant Ever (which is much beloved!).

 

Wolves of Willoughby Chase was written by Joan Aiken. She's a marvelous writer and has several books that are worth checking out. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tigerle View Post


 

I too think Watership Down might be too emotionally intense for a ten-year-old. depspite being about bunnies, I think of it as a young-adult book. I also felt The Rats of NIMH to be rather scary. Even though the concentration camp allusion went clear over my head of course, I did pick up the emotional atmosphere (though I think I was much younger than ten when I read it).


DD enjoyed Watership Down when she was about 12 y.o. but she does admit it's emotionally intense.  

 

Rosemary Sutcliffe is another writer from a past era. The Eagle of the Ninth, about a lost legion of Roman soldiers in Britain, is a good read. 

 

Peter Dickinson has written a few books that might suit. A Bone From a Dry Sea has parallel stories about two girls, one from an ancient tribe and another in modern times on an archeolgocial dig with her father. Not only does it explore an interesting theory of human evolution (we descended from "sea apes" living near the ocean, who learned to walk upright with the support of water), the main characters will have special resonance for gifted girls. The girl in the ancient tribe helps them survive and evolve as she is the one who figures out the use of a few tools, but her abilities aren't recognized or appreciated by the tribe. Dickinson also wrote AK, a heart-wrenching book about boy soldiers in a civil war in a modern African country. It's written for children, but I think it's the sort of book that benefits from some adult discussion.  

 

 

It occurs to me that books about talking animals and speculative historic fiction might be just as objectionable to these parents as fantasy fiction books. 

 

Dickinson has written some terrific mysteries for adults, but I can't recall if they might be troublesome for children. One is a good locked-door puzzle, The Yellow Room Conspiracy, and the other has as its lead investigator an elderly, bed bound woman dying of ALS, Some Deaths Before Dying. I suspect, since they are about evil in the British upper society, that I'm forgetting some sexual content that make them inappropriate for her right now. She may be ready for them in a couple of years though. 

 

Along the same vein, I was reading Agatha Christie mysteries when I was about 9 or 10 yrs. old. I didn't mention them earlier because of similar concerns about classism, racism, sexism etc. as with the Nesbit books.  

 

ollyoxenfree is offline  
#36 of 54 Old 12-01-2010, 10:42 AM
 
sapphire_chan's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 27,769
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Have the Noel Streatfield "Shoes" books been mentioned yet?

sapphire_chan is offline  
#37 of 54 Old 12-02-2010, 02:48 PM
 
kcparker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: IC, IA
Posts: 1,629
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Some favorites that I haven't seen mentioned yet:

 

The Great Brain books were among my favorites as a child.

The Phantom Tollbooth, Norton Juster

The Story of My Life, Helen Keller

Island of the Blue Dolphins, Scott O'Dell

The Boxcar Children series, by Gertrude Chandler Warner

 

I know my sister was devouring Charles Dickens and Jane Austen at this age.

 

What about some sort of travelogue books like Steinbeck's Travels with Charlie, Thor Heyerdahl's Kon Tiki: Across the Pacific by Raft, historical accounts of travel like Marco Polo's account of going from Venice to China? Maybe also something like Swimming to Antarctica, by Lynne Cox would be appealing.


Doula, WOHM, wife to a super-fun papa, mama to the Monkey ('07), and his little brother, the Sea Monkey ('09).
kcparker is offline  
#38 of 54 Old 12-03-2010, 08:43 PM
 
sapphire_chan's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 27,769
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Thanks to this thread, I decided to re-read the railway children.

 

Things I could see being problematic if she's a very sensitive child:

boy steals coal (averted by him being caught and apologizing)

Violent man, fire with risk of life and limb, children going into fire all in rapid succession. Ends with everyone okay and man being friendly.

Description of how scared child is about narrowly avoided train wreck

Discussion of the sounds of bones crunching when being set by a doctor, also mention of gore and battle fields

 

 

(And I'm simply not seeing the entitlement from the children. When they ask people for help, they're perfectly willing to accept "no" as an answer and 3/4 of the time they get told off for asking anyway.)

sapphire_chan is offline  
#39 of 54 Old 12-06-2010, 08:40 AM
 
MeepyCat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Boston, MA
Posts: 3,768
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 54 Post(s)


Quote:
Originally Posted by ollyoxenfree View Post

 

I thought of Jane Austen, also suggested by pp, but wondered if the romances would be considered "too mature".  They are certainly tame compared to most teen fiction these days. It's hard to know what some parents will find objectionable. 



In re:  Jane Austen - while many of her books are romances, the extent of the romance is... conversation.  At no point do the people in love kiss, or even touch suggestively.  (I believe that Fanny, in Mansfield Park leans on Edmund's arm at one point, while on a walk, and Marianne in Sense and Sensibility is carried home by Willoughby after she sprains her ankle.  I have read every last one of these books, and that's *it*.)  They may dance together at public occasions.  Girls are seldom alone with men, although they are permitted to receive proposals of marriage in private. Austen expends a lot of ink on the benefits of good manners and familial affection. The book with the most scandalous plotlines (Mansfield Park) is also the one that younger readers are most likely to get bored with.  I would have no trouble giving them to a ten year-old - if her parents disapprove, I don't know what they *would* approve of.

MeepyCat is online now  
#40 of 54 Old 12-06-2010, 09:28 AM
 
ollyoxenfree's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 4,933
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)


Quote:
Originally Posted by MeepyCat View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by ollyoxenfree View Post

 

I thought of Jane Austen, also suggested by pp, but wondered if the romances would be considered "too mature".  They are certainly tame compared to most teen fiction these days. It's hard to know what some parents will find objectionable. 



In re:  Jane Austen - while many of her books are romances, the extent of the romance is... conversation.  At no point do the people in love kiss, or even touch suggestively.  (I believe that Fanny, in Mansfield Park leans on Edmund's arm at one point, while on a walk, and Marianne in Sense and Sensibility is carried home by Willoughby after she sprains her ankle.  I have read every last one of these books, and that's *it*.)  They may dance together at public occasions.  Girls are seldom alone with men, although they are permitted to receive proposals of marriage in private. Austen expends a lot of ink on the benefits of good manners and familial affection. The book with the most scandalous plotlines (Mansfield Park) is also the one that younger readers are most likely to get bored with.  I would have no trouble giving them to a ten year-old - if her parents disapprove, I don't know what they *would* approve of.


I was thinking that the parents may object to the narrow focus on romantic relationships in Austen's books. I have read Jane Austen, and while there is almost no physical demonstration of romance, the books are pretty much entirely focused on male-female partnerships and finding a mate for life. While there is a lot of social commentary by Austen, I think most 10 y.o.'s wouldn't notice most of it. The romance IS the story. 

 

These parents, who appear to have very decided opinions on "appropriate reading material" for a 10 y.o., may prefer that she read stories about exploration, adventures, wildlife, notable achievements ....anything but mating rituals from a previous society, even if those mating rituals are quite innocent by today's standards of blatant physical demonstrations.

 

I agree that lots of 10 or 12 y.o. girls would enjoy Austen. My own DD loved Pride and Prejudice when she read it a couple of years ago, and last year she acted in a stage version. It seems like the OP is struggling with some pretty narrow standards set by the parents of this girl though. I find that if parents are the type to censor reading heavily, they are easily offended by things I would never consider problematic - like an innocent romance. 

ollyoxenfree is offline  
#41 of 54 Old 12-06-2010, 01:04 PM
 
Tigerle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Europe
Posts: 1,386
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 16 Post(s)


Quote:
Originally Posted by MeepyCat View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by ollyoxenfree View Post

 

I thought of Jane Austen, also suggested by pp, but wondered if the romances would be considered "too mature".  They are certainly tame compared to most teen fiction these days. It's hard to know what some parents will find objectionable. 



In re:  Jane Austen - while many of her books are romances, the extent of the romance is... conversation.  At no point do the people in love kiss, or even touch suggestively.  (I believe that Fanny, in Mansfield Park leans on Edmund's arm at one point, while on a walk, and Marianne in Sense and Sensibility is carried home by Willoughby after she sprains her ankle.  I have read every last one of these books, and that's *it*.)  They may dance together at public occasions.  Girls are seldom alone with men, although they are permitted to receive proposals of marriage in private. Austen expends a lot of ink on the benefits of good manners and familial affection. The book with the most scandalous plotlines (Mansfield Park) is also the one that younger readers are most likely to get bored with.  I would have no trouble giving them to a ten year-old - if her parents disapprove, I don't know what they *would* approve of.



Oh but you've forgotten Mr. Knightley drawing Emma's arm through his when he thinks he has to comfort her about Frank Churchill's defection, just before he proposes. Frissons!


Mesleepytime.gifDH geek.gif DS1 10/06 drum.gif DD 08/10 notes.gifDS2 10/12babyf.gifwith SB ribbonyellow.gif and cat.gifcat.gif 
Tigerle is online now  
#42 of 54 Old 12-06-2010, 01:22 PM
 
MeepyCat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Boston, MA
Posts: 3,768
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 54 Post(s)


Quote:
Originally Posted by Tigerle View Post

 



Oh but you've forgotten Mr. Knightley drawing Emma's arm through his when he thinks he has to comfort her about Frank Churchill's defection, just before he proposes. Frissons!

 

OMG, you're right!  I think have to go to the authorities and turn in my English degree now.  Where's the blushing smiley?

 

Nonetheless:  Frissons are as deep as it gets.  These books aren't romances in the way that we discuss romances now - they're artifacts of a time when marriage *was* a respectable woman's work, in a place where women of a certain social class were legally prohibited from pursuing most paying jobs.  It matters who Lizzy Bennett marries because that is THE thing that's going to happen to her.  It is her entire life.

 

I agree that that's whacked, but I still think most parents can get their heads around this kind of romance in the hands of ten year-olds.
 

MeepyCat is online now  
#43 of 54 Old 12-07-2010, 10:06 AM
 
ollyoxenfree's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 4,933
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)


Quote:
Originally Posted by MeepyCat View Post



 

I agree that that's whacked, but I still think most parents can get their heads around this kind of romance in the hands of ten year-olds.
 

 

Yeah, I agree most parents can get their heads around it. "Most parents" may not include those parents who object to Harry Potter and other fantasy novels on the grounds that they promote devil worship or whatever the objection is to speculative children's fiction, as noted by the OP in her first request for suggestions.   

ollyoxenfree is offline  
#44 of 54 Old 12-07-2010, 12:56 PM
 
sapphire_chan's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 27,769
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

How about giving the parents a list of potential books and having them say which are okay? It'll still be a surprise for the kid.

sapphire_chan is offline  
#45 of 54 Old 12-07-2010, 07:10 PM - Thread Starter
 
Monkey Keeper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 1,955
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)


Quote:
Originally Posted by sapphire_chan View Post

How about giving the parents a list of potential books and having them say which are okay? It'll still be a surprise for the kid.



This is a wonderful suggestion!  However, my SIL won't have feedback. She didn't know anything about some books I gave her while back that were left over from my childhood (those goofy Babysitter's Club ones!) and wouldn't read them herself to know whether they were okay--so she sent them back unread.  I have to do the due diligence myself.  I have some good ones bought and an awesome list to work from going forward, though, thanks to the discussion here.


 hearts.gif(6), energy.gif(4.5),  diaper.gif (2) and  IT'S A babygirl.gif!!!!  ~9/24/12~ vbac.gifwaterbirth.jpg

Monkey Keeper is offline  
#46 of 54 Old 12-08-2010, 03:32 PM
 
sapphire_chan's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 27,769
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)


Quote:
Originally Posted by PinkBunch View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by sapphire_chan View Post

How about giving the parents a list of potential books and having them say which are okay? It'll still be a surprise for the kid.



This is a wonderful suggestion!  However, my SIL won't have feedback. She didn't know anything about some books I gave her while back that were left over from my childhood (those goofy Babysitter's Club ones!) and wouldn't read them herself to know whether they were okay--so she sent them back unread.  I have to do the due diligence myself.  I have some good ones bought and an awesome list to work from going forward, though, thanks to the discussion here.
 

Okay, then I'm confused. If you say the books are okay, your SIL will accept that? However, if you tell her "I'm not sure about these" she'll just reject them out of hand? Well then, problem solved! "Hey SIL, have you heard about any of the following books? You haven't? Great! They'll be just find for your dd."

sapphire_chan is offline  
#47 of 54 Old 12-08-2010, 05:31 PM - Thread Starter
 
Monkey Keeper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 1,955
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)


Quote:
Originally Posted by sapphire_chan View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by PinkBunch View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by sapphire_chan View Post

How about giving the parents a list of potential books and having them say which are okay? It'll still be a surprise for the kid.



This is a wonderful suggestion!  However, my SIL won't have feedback. She didn't know anything about some books I gave her while back that were left over from my childhood (those goofy Babysitter's Club ones!) and wouldn't read them herself to know whether they were okay--so she sent them back unread.  I have to do the due diligence myself.  I have some good ones bought and an awesome list to work from going forward, though, thanks to the discussion here.
 

Okay, then I'm confused. If you say the books are okay, your SIL will accept that? However, if you tell her "I'm not sure about these" she'll just reject them out of hand? Well then, problem solved! "Hey SIL, have you heard about any of the following books? You haven't? Great! They'll be just find for your dd."


nak

 

I agree it is confusing, but yes, there is some level trust placed in me along with a quick once-over by mom (read the dust jacket, flip to a random page).  I just try to pick books that are as unobjectionable as possible to avoid the conflict and not waste my money!  Hence my plea for help as I am out of the loop in terms of current children's fiction.


 hearts.gif(6), energy.gif(4.5),  diaper.gif (2) and  IT'S A babygirl.gif!!!!  ~9/24/12~ vbac.gifwaterbirth.jpg

Monkey Keeper is offline  
#48 of 54 Old 12-09-2010, 04:23 PM
 
Tigerchild's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Seattle Eastside
Posts: 5,006
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

I'd double check on Narnia with the parents before buying it.  While Lewis was a Christian author, I know none of my home churches would have approved of it--sorcery is out.  Period.  Esp. since the good guys use sorcery after a fashion in it as well.  But, there are other groups that forgive him that because of his other works.  Because it's in a grey area though, I would check.

 

I think that it'd be neat to ask the parents about Austen.  IME, just because a group does not like fantasy/magic doesn't mean that they will nix the themes of very strong rules about what/who is appropriate to romance, nor will they object to a woman's main fulfillment being found in seeking/obtaining a husband and marriage.  In the group I was a walkaway from, even the dresses style was idolized, and those of us who were in the church probably would understand more than other women who weren't the fear/problems one would face if you didn't find a mate or didn't have a father to broker the relationship or other problem.

 

So...I wouldn't rule out Jane Austen just because the parents don't like R.K Rowling, KWIM?

Tigerchild is offline  
#49 of 54 Old 12-11-2010, 03:15 PM
 
deminc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 392
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

You may want to consider The Mysterious Benedict Society - about four children, gifted in different ways, on a mission. It's a fun read, no sexual stuff, and the plot can be challenging. You can read it on different levels. There are three books in the series, I prefer the first. You can borrow from the library to take a look through first to see if it's suitable.  

 

Edit to add: someone suggested The Giver. I think you best look through it first as it may not be suitable for the sensitive child. This is a very interesting layered book, but controversial. In some schools, it is on the reading list. In others it is not allowed. The pivotal part of the book is when the protagonist sees his father killing a baby that was deemed "unviable" for their society, and then simply depositing the body in a dustbin. His entire worldview is shaken and he realises that hisnew brother will also be euthanised because he can't sleep through the night. Subsequently he discovers that the previous child selected for his current role chose to die instead of completing her training. The adults are portrayed as helpless, deceitful and ignorant. So consider with care.    

deminc is offline  
#50 of 54 Old 12-14-2010, 03:40 PM - Thread Starter
 
Monkey Keeper's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 1,955
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)


Quote:
Originally Posted by deminc View Post

You may want to consider The Mysterious Benedict Society - about four children, gifted in different ways, on a mission. It's a fun read, no sexual stuff, and the plot can be challenging. You can read it on different levels. There are three books in the series, I prefer the first. You can borrow from the library to take a look through first to see if it's suitable.  

 


THanks!!! This is what I actually bought; it looked good, so I'm glad to hear that you enjoyed it.  I think she will too--and it's long, so that helps with value :)  


 hearts.gif(6), energy.gif(4.5),  diaper.gif (2) and  IT'S A babygirl.gif!!!!  ~9/24/12~ vbac.gifwaterbirth.jpg

Monkey Keeper is offline  
#51 of 54 Old 12-14-2010, 03:41 PM
 
DesertFlower's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Under the shade of an elder tree
Posts: 639
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Anne of Green Gables!

DesertFlower is offline  
#52 of 54 Old 12-16-2010, 11:48 PM
 
domesticidyll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 221
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Sweet to see so many of my old favorites (and nice to see some things I haven't read).

 

You might also look at Shannon Hale--try Goose Girl.

 

Heather

domesticidyll is offline  
#53 of 54 Old 12-17-2010, 07:31 AM
 
Tigerle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Europe
Posts: 1,386
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 16 Post(s)


Quote:
Originally Posted by MeepyCat View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by Tigerle View Post

 



Oh but you've forgotten Mr. Knightley drawing Emma's arm through his when he thinks he has to comfort her about Frank Churchill's defection, just before he proposes. Frissons!

 

OMG, you're right!  I think have to go to the authorities and turn in my English degree now.  Where's the blushing smiley?

 

Nonetheless:  Frissons are as deep as it gets.  These books aren't romances in the way that we discuss romances now - they're artifacts of a time when marriage *was* a respectable woman's work, in a place where women of a certain social class were legally prohibited from pursuing most paying jobs.  It matters who Lizzy Bennett marries because that is THE thing that's going to happen to her.  It is her entire life.

 

I agree that that's whacked, but I still think most parents can get their heads around this kind of romance in the hands of ten year-olds.
 



Sorry, just couldn't resist. compulsive correctors lurk in this forum and rear their ugly heads, now and again. Didn't we have a self-help-thread about this recently?

 

Really enjoyed how you summed up what P&P is all about.


Mesleepytime.gifDH geek.gif DS1 10/06 drum.gif DD 08/10 notes.gifDS2 10/12babyf.gifwith SB ribbonyellow.gif and cat.gifcat.gif 
Tigerle is online now  
#54 of 54 Old 12-19-2010, 08:08 AM
 
Cavy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Norfolk, UK
Posts: 451
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

I also wanted to query whether Narnia books would be ok, there's lots of magic in them.

What about SciFi? There's heaps of SciFi out there that could be suitable, Asimov produced the biggest thickest tomes.  I Robot series, then there's Heinlein, Bradbury and their prodigious output...

 

Since there was so much talk of Nesbitt, may I suggest the Swallows and Amazons series by Arthur Ransome? 

http://www.arthur-ransome.org/ar/bibliography

There are heaps of them and they are very good old fashioned adventure stories (written quite well).

I was reading plenty of my dad's pat mystery novels at about that age, like Dick Francis books. Which are more formulaic than scarey.

I simply adore Dogsbody by Diana Wynne Jones, most of her other books are fantasy, though.

 

If you were in Britain I would also suggest authors: Michael Morpurgo, Philip Pullman, Joshua Doder, Erin Hunter.


~ Yank Transplant to Britain and Zookeeper of 4 DC age 15 and under. ~
Cavy is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Drag and Drop File Upload
Drag files here to attach!
Upload Progress: 0
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Mothering Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off