WWYD if you couldn't afford private school, HS was not working out, and PS didn't offer gifted accommodations? - Page 2 - Mothering Forums

Forum Jump: 
Reply
 
Thread Tools
#31 of 41 Old 03-29-2011, 02:18 PM - Thread Starter
 
Galatea's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Posts: 7,093
Mentioned: 31 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 29 Post(s)


Quote:
Originally Posted by kathymuggle View Post

Hugs - I know some parents have found solutions they are totally happy with, but for many of us there is some muddling along.  Perhaps teaching (and learning ourselves) how to thrive in our situations is the best idea.  


I agree.  Wishing for things to be other than they are usually only lasts a little while before I wake up!

 


DS1 2004 ~ DS2 2005 ~ DD1 2008 ~ DS3 2010 ~ DD2 due Dec. 2014
On hospital bedrest for pPROM since 23 weeks
Galatea is online now  
#32 of 41 Old 03-29-2011, 03:40 PM
 
joensally's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 2,977
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)


Quote:
Originally Posted by kathymuggle View Post

I would use public school or try to fix/figure out the HSing situation.

 

I would not go private - you cannot afford it and you could find some excellent extra-curriculars and even some babysitting for a fraction of the cost of private.  I place a premium on family togetherness - DH working extra hours for someone to go to private school would not work for me.

 

Hugs - I know some parents have found solutions they are totally happy with, but for many of us there is some muddling along.  Perhaps teaching (and learning ourselves) how to thrive in our situations is the best idea.  



Kathy, very succinctly put.  Sometimes it's about being ok with imperfect, or not as we'd like.  Really sucks when it's our kids though.

 

Galatea, I recently read a GREAT book that you might find helpful. It's written by a woman who HS'd her quirky, gifted daughter for grade five.  She's conflicted about the education system, about homeschooling, and describes the ambivalence and shaken confidence that many of us experience as we grapple with things not being as we'd hoped or expected.  She took her dreamy, lovely, imaginative, quirky kid out for one year as a sabbatical for her DD.  It's an easy read, so even though you're time crunched it's not a huge time suck.   Interestingly, it's being re-released under a new title.  I read it under the title Love in a Time of Homeschooling, but it's coming out shortly in paperback as:

http://www.amazon.com/One-Good-Year-Daughters-Educational/dp/0061706507/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1301438064&sr=1-1

 


Mom to a teenager and a middle schooler.

joensally is offline  
#33 of 41 Old 03-29-2011, 03:47 PM
 
NYCVeg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: On my couch
Posts: 5,189
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

I just want to reiterate that MANY private schools offer (sometimes substantial) financial aid. In my neck of the woods, many of the elite private schools have something like 50% of the kids receiving some sort of financial assistance. Generally, at least in my experience, your children need to be accepted to the school in order for you to put in the application for financial aid--so it might be worth applying to some of the schools in your area and then seeing if you're offered a suitable financial aid package. Schools will also often waive the application fee for families that plan on applying for aid. 

 

NYCVeg is offline  
#34 of 41 Old 03-30-2011, 05:31 AM - Thread Starter
 
Galatea's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Posts: 7,093
Mentioned: 31 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 29 Post(s)


Quote:
Originally Posted by NYCVeg View Post

I just want to reiterate that MANY private schools offer (sometimes substantial) financial aid. In my neck of the woods, many of the elite private schools have something like 50% of the kids receiving some sort of financial assistance. Generally, at least in my experience, your children need to be accepted to the school in order for you to put in the application for financial aid--so it might be worth applying to some of the schools in your area and then seeing if you're offered a suitable financial aid package. Schools will also often waive the application fee for families that plan on applying for aid. 

 



In your experience, do they hew to the policies stated on their websites?  For example, the private school in our town (where I went to high school) says they offer aid based on need only (well, we have need, but if they would add weight to me being an alumna and the kids' giftedness...)  And the other private school in the big city where I went for grade school, they say they base it on merit and need, but in lower school, it won't exceed 50% of tuition (then 75% in middle school, then more in high school.)  I wonder if these policies are hard and fast, or not.  And at this late date in the application cycle, is there anything left?


DS1 2004 ~ DS2 2005 ~ DD1 2008 ~ DS3 2010 ~ DD2 due Dec. 2014
On hospital bedrest for pPROM since 23 weeks
Galatea is online now  
#35 of 41 Old 03-30-2011, 05:32 AM - Thread Starter
 
Galatea's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Posts: 7,093
Mentioned: 31 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 29 Post(s)


Quote:
Originally Posted by joensally View Post





Kathy, very succinctly put.  Sometimes it's about being ok with imperfect, or not as we'd like.  Really sucks when it's our kids though.

 

Galatea, I recently read a GREAT book that you might find helpful. It's written by a woman who HS'd her quirky, gifted daughter for grade five.  She's conflicted about the education system, about homeschooling, and describes the ambivalence and shaken confidence that many of us experience as we grapple with things not being as we'd hoped or expected.  She took her dreamy, lovely, imaginative, quirky kid out for one year as a sabbatical for her DD.  It's an easy read, so even though you're time crunched it's not a huge time suck.   Interestingly, it's being re-released under a new title.  I read it under the title Love in a Time of Homeschooling, but it's coming out shortly in paperback as:

http://www.amazon.com/One-Good-Year-Daughters-Educational/dp/0061706507/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1301438064&sr=1-1

 


Thank you - this looks interesting!

 


DS1 2004 ~ DS2 2005 ~ DD1 2008 ~ DS3 2010 ~ DD2 due Dec. 2014
On hospital bedrest for pPROM since 23 weeks
Galatea is online now  
#36 of 41 Old 03-30-2011, 06:43 AM
 
ollyoxenfree's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 4,933
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)


Quote:
Originally Posted by kathymuggle View Post

 

Hugs - I know some parents have found solutions they are totally happy with, but for many of us there is some muddling along.  Perhaps teaching (and learning ourselves) how to thrive in our situations is the best idea.  


So true. You know, even when relatively happy, I think it's human to wonder about other possibilities and "what ifs". It's a "grass looks greener" thing. Some, if not most, of those "totally happy" people are probably still wondering what else they could do, have or get for their children's education - or at least, some aspect of it. My dc are pretty happy with their education, but we all sometimes wish for the opportunities that would have been available if some things were different. Personally, I try to optimize whatever situation we find ourselves in - since I think that's the best way to stay emotionally healthy. Unless full-scale change in school is realistically possible, then I think it's best to enjoy the positives and ameliorate the negatives however we can. 

 

 

 

ollyoxenfree is offline  
#37 of 41 Old 03-30-2011, 07:36 AM
 
Linda on the move's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: basking in the sunshine
Posts: 10,634
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 62 Post(s)


Quote:
Originally Posted by Galatea View Post
In your experience, do they hew to the policies stated on their websites?  ...  And at this late date in the application cycle, is there anything left?


The policies are not stated on the website for the private school my kids go to. Scholarship money is VERY tight right now because the school is working to keep kids into whose families used to pay for the school but due to job lose no longer can. Rather than booting them out, they've been switched to scholarships (which is the right thing to do). So families who've never been to the school really can't get  scholarships right now. But this is temporary. The economy will turn around.

 

And the OPers child is like 5. It's VERY early in the cycle. I'm having trouble wrapping my head around the idea that everything needs to be set up for middle school when a child is in k or first. Or that just because you can't make something happen this year or next, that it's off the table.

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by ollyoxenfree View Post

 

Some, if not most, of those "totally happy" people are probably still wondering what else they could do, have or get for their children's education - or at least, some aspect of it.

My kids are older than most on the board (12 and 14) and we are past "still wondering,"  but only because we've tried different things, made their education a priority and really worked at all this. I think that for any parent to think they can have it all figured out for a 5 year old is unrealistic.

 


but everything has pros and cons  shrug.gif

Linda on the move is online now  
#38 of 41 Old 03-30-2011, 12:46 PM - Thread Starter
 
Galatea's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Posts: 7,093
Mentioned: 31 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 29 Post(s)

He's going into 2nd grade, but it's okay, I understand why you're saying.  I just meant, for this year, the finaid money is prolly all gone (at least according to the admissions office.)  Anyway, it doesn't matter, b/c I have decided to make HS work, and am already feeling reinvigorated.  I just needed a reminder that we pulled him out of PS for a reason and that I am not supposed to recreate school at home.


DS1 2004 ~ DS2 2005 ~ DD1 2008 ~ DS3 2010 ~ DD2 due Dec. 2014
On hospital bedrest for pPROM since 23 weeks
Galatea is online now  
#39 of 41 Old 03-30-2011, 07:04 PM
 
mrvnsk9's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Oklahoma
Posts: 26
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I have read a couple of your posts and they sound very familiar. We also have four kids: 8,7,4, and 2. All of our kids are bright but our 7 year old seemed exceptionally bright. We had his IQ tested last year and we found he was in the 99.9%. For about a year I went a little crazy researching and trying to find the best schools, activities, etc for him. He is now a Davidson Young scholar. In August he got into a full day public school gifted program about 40 min. away from our house. My husband took him in the mornings and I picked him up in the afternoon. I thought I did my research on the school but it ended up being a disaster. He learned nothing and was with very socially disturbed kids. In January we brought him back to our small school district PS with his siblings and he is doing great. The teachers are at least trying. After searching and searching my advice to you would be to calm down and try and see the bigger picture. He needs to be happy, he is a child. I know our son isn't learning much but is very happy and socially great. I think later on social problems might arise so I feel I am getting him a head start right now. I have to remember I am trying to raise a whole child into a whole adult, not just a gifted bright adult. He needs to learn how to be kind, caring, loving, etc. He even got into a prestigious gifted private school, but we could not afford the tuition. Now looking back I am glad we didn't make the sacrifices to get him in, he is in 1st grade and I do not feel he needs the pressure. He absolutely loves to learn so that is what I am trying to let him do, while still being a kid. I do think finding their passions are a gigantic help! He used to love geography, now it is his atlas and piano. He doesn't require nearly the sleep my other children do so he stays up late and plays the piano for an hour or reads his favorite books. I still can't believe I am typing and saying these things because a year ago I felt completely different. The best advice I feel I have receive so far is: "You know he is exceptional but if that is all he knows how will he relate to normal" Good Luck!!!
mrvnsk9 is offline  
#40 of 41 Old 03-31-2011, 07:08 PM
 
Stella_luna's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Philly burbs
Posts: 434
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

I have a good friend whose son is enrolled in a virtual online public school called Connections Academy. It is a PA public school, so free, but the child works at his own pace, like homeschooling. He is very bright--he just turned 9 last week and is entering 5th grade. He can work as far ahead as his pace allows. It has been a fantastic experience for them. My DD LOVES her school, and we are very happy with it as well, but if it ever starts not working out for any reason, that's what I plan to do with her!

 

http://www.connectionsacademy.com/home.aspx

Stella_luna is offline  
#41 of 41 Old 04-02-2011, 09:39 PM
 
carmel23's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Pacific Northwest
Posts: 5,218
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Can you talk to the local public school about doing some days 1/2 time?  We were able to work this out for our son one year. Virtual schools are another option. But in the end, school was best for our kid.  He needs to see the same kids each day, not some kids here or there.  It is difficult for him to  build friendships otherwise. 

 

good luck!  It is so hard juggling work and kids, and then balancing everything. 


 hh2.gif  ~~~~~~~~~~hh2.gif
 

carmel23 is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Drag and Drop File Upload
Drag files here to attach!
Upload Progress: 0
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Mothering Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off