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#1 of 18 Old 05-10-2011, 03:36 PM - Thread Starter
 
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So, I know toddlers are supposed to want to read the same books over and over again as part of their literacy development but apparently DD (26 months) doesn't. She is insisting on only reading 'new books.' She has been for awhile but we would go to the library once a week and she was content. Now apparently books are only 'new' for 3-4 days. I'm not sure how to address this as we really don't have time for a second trip to the library in the week. (It's a major outing when we go - taking up the whole morning.) I'm also feeling disinclined to add to her own library of books which makes me sad because I love picture books! Just wondering how others may have handled similar situations and whether it's just a stage that she is likely to grow out of or a learning style preference.
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#2 of 18 Old 05-10-2011, 03:44 PM
 
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Respect what she is telling.  

 

Have books she can go through own her own.  

 

From the library pick up a bunch put in several bags.  Put some up for other days.  Put other ones away.  Maybe bring them out again in a few days.  

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#3 of 18 Old 05-10-2011, 03:57 PM
 
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My son was a bit like that. He still is actually, at age 10. Once he's read a book once, he's done. Dh is like this too. My daughter and I get great pleasure out of reading the same books over and over.

 

I think the pp's idea of putting some new books away for a few days and rotating them is a good one. Get a stack of books. But them in three carrier bags. Have each one out for 2-3 days. Who knows why she's like this, and maybe she'll outgrow it, maybe she won't!


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#4 of 18 Old 05-10-2011, 06:23 PM
 
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Toddlers are different. I had one that never wanted books repeated and one that liked some repetition. I would try checking out more books at a time. I'd try moving into short stories and novels for read-a-loud. I'd also try doing theatrical stuff with books you own. Try having her act out the stories with dolls as you read. Try having her do a puppet show. That might give more life to your books.

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#5 of 18 Old 05-11-2011, 08:44 AM
 
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Yes, check out as many books as you can. It was not uncommon for me to come home with 20+ books.

 

My oldest daughter was like that for several years.

Tammy

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#6 of 18 Old 05-11-2011, 12:15 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Thanks.  We will definitely try checking out more books this week and hiding some away for a few days.  Hopefully that will help solve the problem!
 

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Toddlers are different. I had one that never wanted books repeated and one that liked some repetition. I would try checking out more books at a time. I'd try moving into short stories and novels for read-a-loud. I'd also try doing theatrical stuff with books you own. Try having her act out the stories with dolls as you read. Try having her do a puppet show. That might give more life to your books.


Any suggestions for short stories/novels for a 2-year old?  I'm not really sure that she's quite ready for this yet.  She loves Frog and Toad.  We tried Winnie the Pooh with her though a month or two ago and she kept wanting to skip ahead to see the pictures rather than listening to the story.  Then she got really obsessed with the book so we ended up putting it up to try again in a couple of months.  I guess we could have just let her look at the pictures....

 

She's all over acting out the stories already.  We don't let her do this while we are actually reading to her because 1) our most common story times are on the potty and before nap/bed-time and 2) acting them out becomes quite elaborate often involving moving furniture, creating props, etc.  She's kind of the same way with her play though - now that I think about it.  She wants to play one story/theme - either from a book or a new life experience (e.g. going to a baseball game) over and over again for a couple of days and then she's not really interested in it anymore.

 

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#7 of 18 Old 05-11-2011, 12:48 PM
 
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I guess I approach this more from a "let's consider history" perspective and I don't think it is natural for a small child to be able to demand new anything all the time.  I see it more as a need to foster a deeper exploration of the material or find a different outlet for her interests (something other than books).

 

FWIW, I admittedly have far too many books and we get lots from the library often, but when my kids get insatiable like that about stuff I tend to pull back, not give more.  It does seem to correct itself if I don't feed the monster.

 

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#8 of 18 Old 05-11-2011, 01:19 PM
 
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At 26 months, I am wondering how well she recalls each book. If you return a book to the library after she has it for a couple of days, will she remember it and object if you take it out again in a few months?  It doesn't address the issue of repetition/practicing reading fluency (although I'm not sure that really is an issue), but it might help ease the pain of trying to find new materials for her. 

 

 

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#9 of 18 Old 05-11-2011, 01:21 PM
 
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If you've tried short stories and she's asking you to skip forward for pictures, I'd say she's not ready and it wouldn't accomplish what you'd want it too. My eldest who was the "little repetition" kid DID love novels without pictures as a toddler so it was easier to accomodate. Books like the "Mother West Wind" stories, "The Brownie and the Princess" collection by Alcott as well as "Mrs. Piggle-Wiggle" where short enough to read in their entirety, give her new stories daily. DS didn't really settle into short stories and novels until close to 4. He would play on the floor while I read novels to my eldest but he didn't actually crawl up with us for a non-picture book until later.

 

Have you tried to set-up a pattern like saying "only one new book a day" and then giving her the choice of others you got from the library but read earlier or books you own.

 

She may outgrow this. My child that never liked repetition did start to have favorites that she wanted to read and re-read.... especially when she started reading fluently herself.


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#10 of 18 Old 05-11-2011, 01:40 PM
 
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#11 of 18 Old 05-11-2011, 08:50 PM
 
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If she is very visual and likes pictures, but seems to get through library books quickly, maybe she needs pictures but more complexity. The Beatrix Potter books are good for this, Make Way for Ducklings, etc. But I do think the wanting new books is quite normal and not to be a worry. I'd build up the home library how you'd like, anyway, and go to the public library to keep up the new stuff. Also, she may be ready for not having those pictures, soon. Children can change very rapidly at that age, and what doesn't work now may work in a month. I read the Thorton w Burgess books and some of the Little House books with my two oldest children around that age (my youngest defininitely continued to prefer picture books for a ling time, which is OK, too).

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#12 of 18 Old 05-12-2011, 08:41 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Thanks so much for all of your thoughts/suggestions and book titles!
 

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The question is 'why' does the child want new books. That is critical, because it impacts the best way to handle things. If it was about a child being obsessed about something, that is a separate issue.

 

In our case, it was for two reasons.

a) My child was VERY visual. As such, the pictures were a highly critical element of the book. Once she's absorbed the pictures, though, she needed more visual input in the form of another book. She was similar with her environment even as an infant, and would become very bored after a while in one room, because there was nothing visually interesting to look at any more. I very much see this as more learning style than anything. (visual)

b) Fodder.  She had a very high level of imagination. The more stories, the more ideas she had in her mind, and the more she could pull ideas. It is look putting fuel on a fire. The fuel (books) allows the imagination to burn brighter. Putting an old burnt long on the fire, doesn't add to the imagination/thoughts. This I see as more learning style. (story-based) We've also seen this sort of style fostered in many things throughout her life. She learns best via stories, and the more she has, the more connections she can make.

 

 

Interestingly I don't think of her as visual at all - I just assume that she needs the pictures to help scaffold her comprehension.  She has an amazing memory for stories, songs, verbal info and her language development is advanced.  Also - she knows her alphabet and can name words that begin with each sound but can't identify all of the letters.  She can count but can't identify any numbers.  She loves dramatic play but has no interest in building/blocks - unless it supports her story.  I definitely see reason number 2 being the case for her though and I've never heard of a "story-based" learning style before but I'd say that completely describes her!  She will even turn her own experiences into stories and use literate language in the telling of them.  And it seems like everything that she reads/experiences is material for her imagination to take off with.

 

I'm not really concerned with her exploration lacking depth at this point.  She does want repeated readings of the books (often 3-4 per times per book in a day - just not for more than 3-4 days) and she definitely absorbs the stories - can retell most of them and improvises changes.  She will often develop interests and asks for additional books around new information.  For example - this week she wanted books about bamboo and pandas.  As I mentioned the interests don't last long but she she does recall the info over time.  I'd say she doesn't have a particularly deep understanding of any particular subject but is very curious about everything which at 2 seems perfectly reasonable.

 

She actually does remember the books - for a ridiculously long time.  Some of them she's happy to revisit if I wait long enough - others not so much.  It hasn't actually been that difficult yet finding new books - just rotating them often enough. But I do think that the suggestion to check out more from the library and put some up for later may solve this problem.

 

I definitely feel better about adding to our library too.  We do after all have another little one on the way.  Maybe she'll want to read some of our "old books" to the baby.  And hopefully when she can read them herself she'll want to revisit some of them again.

 

Thanks again for taking the time to respond!

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#13 of 18 Old 05-13-2011, 01:11 PM
 
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First, I do think it is very natural for some kids to demand 'new'. They are utterly exploring/absorbing their environment, and they purposefully seek out new items, and things they don't know. This can be especially true for gifted kids.

I don't think we can say this is a "don't feed the monster" type issue.

 

The question is 'why' does the child want new books. That is critical, because it impacts the best way to handle things. If it was about a child being obsessed about something, that is a separate issue.

 


 

 



I guess I wasn't trying to say it was unnatural for a child to demand new things all the time, but I think it is unnatural to be able to fulfill that demand.  Or not even quite that - I think new stuff all the time is very fulfillable too - but as a varied diet of life, not new of the same type of object all the time.  I see it as a problem of affluence.  I don't think it is necessary or appropriate, even if they want it.  Even if they are astoundingly brilliant and soak it all up instantly.  In any halfway decent book there is always something more to be gained from a second and third reading.  For anyone - baby to adult.

 

I do agree that by all means one consider why a child is expecting a new book every time.  Is it the pictures?  Is it the way the stories read?  A good quality book with interesting pictures and particularly well written words is much more fun to read repeatedly than an easy reader from the library.  Especially one with surprising rhymes and a clean rhythm.  Is it a "grass is always greener" type thing?  What is the child getting out of it that they would not get from a re-read?  Is it that there are so many books out visually that the child is sort of overwhelmed?  Are there too many on hand to choose from?  Is there something in particular the child wants to understand more?  

 

But I personally do think that letting a child insist and demand new books all the time is not good for them.  If the books you have aren't good enough to satisfy the child's curiosity, then do something other than books.  A child will find something to occupy themselves.  And if you want to buy books for your collection - by all means.  I LOVE children's books too.  It isn't the act of having books or reading them that I see as a negative in this scenario - it's the attitude of the child that, in my household, would warrant guidance.   

 

Tjej

 

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#14 of 18 Old 05-13-2011, 03:38 PM
 
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#16 of 18 Old 05-15-2011, 09:28 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Quote:
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She has an amazing memory for stories, songs, verbal info and her language development is advanced.  Also - she knows her alphabet and can name words that begin with each sound but can't identify all of the letters.  She can count but can't identify any numbers.

 

This is also similar to my child, in most ways.

 

A letter/number, does not have the visual interest of a picture....it is a boring meaningless symbol in their mind. At 4, dd could add tons of detail to her drawings, but wanted nothing to do with letters/numbers, because they were not visually interesting.  She is amazingly strong with her memory of verbal information, and could quote me passages back verbatim. At the same time, she does not have a strong memory for math facts.

 

It is a very interesting mix that I see with her, in that she is very visual, in that she is drawn to the pictures, and visually interesting in her environment, but she also has auditory skills. (I literally moved her from room to room as an infant, because after X amount of time, she would get visually bored.)  It is an interesting mix, because I see in math, forget trying to explain in words. If you can state the problem by drawing it out, she does far better.

 

I think with my daughter, the pictures were more than scaffolding. It is what made those stories come alive for her.

 

Tammy

 

 


Interesting - thanks for sharing.  I am definitely not a visual learner and in fact have some deficits in my ability to visualize. I'm sure this also influences how I perceive her.  It will be interesting to see how she develops!  :-)

 



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But I personally do think that letting a child insist and demand new books all the time is not good for them.  If the books you have aren't good enough to satisfy the child's curiosity, then do something other than books.  A child will find something to occupy themselves.  And if you want to buy books for your collection - by all means.  I LOVE children's books too.  It isn't the act of having books or reading them that I see as a negative in this scenario - it's the attitude of the child that, in my household, would warrant guidance.   

 

Tjej

 


I didn't give a very accurate/fair description of the situation/her behavior.  It certainly has nothing to do with being affluent as we are unfortunately not (unless you mean relative to people who live in places where there are not public libraries in which case - yes we are indeed quite fortunate)!  So - just to clarify and clear my daughter's reputation....  she is not actually initiating demands for new books all the time.  A good part of this has to do with our sleep situation.  We have "quiet time" as part of our schedule twice a day - before naps and before bed.  She is allowed to do puzzles or low maintenance "art" if she wants and then we read three books.  When she has "new" books, this works well.  She chooses books appropriately, sits and listens to them well, and calms down which shortens the amount of time (generally anywhere from 1-2 hours) that it takes her to fall asleep.  When she does not have "new" books, she refuses to choose, refuses the choices we offer, and avoids sitting down to read.  Ultimately what often happens is she chooses some of her "baby" books or we choose for her, she plays around while we are reading/looking at them, and rather than calming down often does the opposite.  So really - she'd be perfectly happy to not look at books until the next trip to the library - but I also have an agenda.  I have tried other quiet activities but haven't found anything else that calms her down.  I do make an effort to select primarily quality books for her and - as I mentioned earlier - she will often request as many as 3-4 repeated readings of a single book per day for the first 3-4 days. So I'm hoping that borrowing more books from the library and putting some up will work for both of us.  And I'm ok with taking advantage of our relative affluence and patronizing the library because it's certainly better than having to waste gas driving her around in the car until she falls asleep (which wouldn't work anyways).  ;-)  Sorry to have miscommunicated.

 

 

 

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#17 of 18 Old 05-15-2011, 10:50 PM
 
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Ah, that is a tough fix.  I did not see the context of your situation.

 

Would a chapter type book like Winnie the Pooh intrigue her enough to use a story or two from there before bed?  Or perhaps just simple storytelling on your part would fill the purpose?  My kids love it when I make up stories that include them (and some of the things we've done that day or read about or something silly).  At bedtime the stories usually end in everyone being very tired, going to bed, laying their head on the pillow and falling asleep right away. ;)

 

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#18 of 18 Old 05-16-2011, 02:49 AM
 
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IDK if you are looking for book suggestions or not but some that my DS liked were the Little Critter books by Mercer Mayer,  I SPY books, Mike Mulligan and His Steamshovel (Virgina L Burton)

 

Now would also be a great time to befriend the childrens librarian.  He/she will become a valuable resource in the coming years!


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