How many of our children also have special needs? - Page 2 - Mothering Forums

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#31 of 42 Old 05-16-2011, 06:09 AM
 
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I meant to ask you this before but forgot... does this have anything to do with being bilingual (I can't remember what languages you speak with your family?).  I'm curious because when we get DD tested I'm sure they will at least discuss language issues and since there's such a huge difference between English and the local language here, I wonder if this will come up?  Although, she's certainly getting better, just thinking out loud here... winky.gif


DS isn't bilingual (sadly), so this can have nothing to do with it. We do no know yet what it's about and I am kind of test weary and would rather focus on the sensory issues at the moment, so go back and forth over whether we should do a language eval or real IQ testing or sit it out for a while until early entry into 1st grade becomes an issue (or not). The weird thing is that his language skills (to listen to) are stellar, and he scored very highly (high 90s, but as it was developmentental testing in order to turn up delays not an actual IQ test take all of this with a grain of salt) on everything that involved explaining a concept, or a cause-and-effect relationship, such as "what do you have to do in order to mail a parcel" or "why shouldn't you go to school with a cold" but he  just couldn't or wouldn't define a simple word on the expressive language test like "mailman". He also couldn't or wouldn't act out a story read to him with dolls (receptive language test). They have referred us to developmental counseling and the counseor video'd  more dolls' play and it appears it just isn't DS' thing - he'd rather finish out the story he was supposed to continue playing with the dolls verbally in the shortest possible way, refusing to get into any complicated emotional stuff ("so the mama says there isn't really a monster under your bed and the little boy lies back down in his bed and is fine"; "the little boy is happy his parents have driven off because his granny has come over to babysit and he loves her so much"). He was also really intrigued by the furniture and the neat little wooden convertible car and would happily have continued working on fitting the whole doll family into the beds or the car which was a bit tricky technically but actually having them interact like people and show (or talk about) emotions? No way.


 

 


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#32 of 42 Old 05-24-2011, 09:26 PM
 
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I have a gifted, dyslexic kid, which isn't a surprise at all given her family background.... hm, well maybe except for the fact that she's a girl and it's been boys who were diagnosed thus far. The girls managed to fly under the radar so to speak. (I literally cannot tell right and left if I put my wedding rings on the wrong hand; and yet I tested into Mensa. "Your other left" is a daily statement in my family of birth and my immediate family both.)


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#33 of 42 Old 05-25-2011, 02:28 AM
 
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I have a friends whose daughter was diagnosed to have an ADHD and the doctor told her to give much attention to it and reconcile with her husband. maybe it's one reason why she can't focus much to her.

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#34 of 42 Old 05-25-2011, 06:14 AM
 
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I have a gifted, dyslexic kid, which isn't a surprise at all given her family background.... hm, well maybe except for the fact that she's a girl and it's been boys who were diagnosed thus far. The girls managed to fly under the radar so to speak. (I literally cannot tell right and left if I put my wedding rings on the wrong hand; and yet I tested into Mensa. "Your other left" is a daily statement in my family of birth and my immediate family both.)



DH still needs to do the trick where your pointer finger and thumb form an "L" shape on your left hand not your right.  It took me years to learn that one too!lol.gif

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#35 of 42 Old 05-25-2011, 06:21 AM
 
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DH still needs to do the trick where your pointer finger and thumb form an "L" shape on your left hand not your right.  It took me years to learn that one too!lol.gif

Ah, but one can surreptitiously feel for rings, whereas making L shapes in the air lets people know you can't tell left from right! Also, we tried that with DD, but as she often makes Ls backward (and S), it doesn't seem to have helped! She is learning cursive writing, which is helping with reversals in printing as well. 
 

 


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#36 of 42 Old 05-25-2011, 06:42 AM
 
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Ah, but one can surreptitiously feel for rings, whereas making L shapes in the air lets people know you can't tell left from right! Also, we tried that with DD, but as she often makes Ls backward (and S), it doesn't seem to have helped! She is learning cursive writing, which is helping with reversals in printing as well. 
 

 


Why didn't I think of the ring thing?? I always just tell people to point which side/direction they mean because right and left are for some reason meaningless to me!

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#37 of 42 Old 06-01-2011, 08:02 PM - Thread Starter
 
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biglaugh.gifhehe - I do the "L" thing all the time too!


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#38 of 42 Old 06-02-2011, 01:56 PM
 
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I think almost 3 is still so young to know for sure if they are gifted or if their quirks are more than just quirks.


DD sounds just like your son did.  She is advanced (more than likely gifted) and had so many quirks and all were related to sensory.  Since she was also selective mute (never officially diagnosed, but wouldn't talk to anyone she did not know really well for 2 years), we knew that evaluations would not help.  She had an awesome Kindergarten teacher who was able to work on those quirks with her.  She still has a lot of sensory problems, but is able to work through most of them herself.

 

As long as you meet him where he's at and keep him learning what he's interested in,  he'll succeed.  Glad you are getting him evaluated so no matter what you know for sure what you are working with and have ideas on how to help him become the great person he is meant to be

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#39 of 42 Old 06-02-2011, 02:38 PM - Thread Starter
 
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As long as you meet him where he's at and keep him learning what he's interested in,  he'll succeed.  Glad you are getting him evaluated so no matter what you know for sure what you are working with and have ideas on how to help him become the great person he is meant to be


Thanks - that's good advice!

 


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#40 of 42 Old 06-02-2011, 09:49 PM
 
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I'm late to this thread, but I totally agree that an evaluation is a good idea if you feel like something's off.  Insight made by specialists has been very helpful to us, though I still feel like we don't yet have the full pictuer as to what goes on with DD.  She's definitely gifted, and everyone agrees that she has sensory processing problems.  We just had an evaluation this week and the only "new" conclusion is that she's definitely not autistic, though she could maybe be dx Asperger's in the future depending on how things play out.  She may or may not fit into some other neat category (ADHD, perhaps) later on instead, but for now she is still just smart, SPD, and very quirky in a way that doesn't fit into any easy boxes.


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#41 of 42 Old 06-11-2011, 10:57 AM
 
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My daughter likely wouldn't qualify as gifted, however she really excells in some areas, notably reading.  She knew the alphabet & the sounds each letter makes before she was 2.  She taught herself this through  a video as well as the leapfrog fridge magnet toy.  I have been working on her on reading though, & she started reading simple books at age 3.5. She just turned 4 last week & is reading at a grade one level.  I've been trying to get a good video of her reading but because she can read much more quickly than she can speak (& because we try not to put pressure on her by testing) it is hard to get it on tape. My daughter has Down syndrome.


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#42 of 42 Old 06-12-2011, 05:21 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I'm late to this thread, but I totally agree that an evaluation is a good idea if you feel like something's off.  Insight made by specialists has been very helpful to us, though I still feel like we don't yet have the full pictuer as to what goes on with DD.  She's definitely gifted, and everyone agrees that she has sensory processing problems.  We just had an evaluation this week and the only "new" conclusion is that she's definitely not autistic, though she could maybe be dx Asperger's in the future depending on how things play out.  She may or may not fit into some other neat category (ADHD, perhaps) later on instead, but for now she is still just smart, SPD, and very quirky in a way that doesn't fit into any easy boxes.



Yes, trying to get an evaluation. This is a long process in NY because I have to come up with a 2 page letter on why we don't vax! That's hard to do with a toddler, but working on it.  I have a feeling that DS won't fit into a neat package either. I know he's intelligent and quirky, but I'm not sure if he will qualify for help because we've taken such good care of him, that his symptoms are minimal. He's been gluten, dairy, casein, corn and soy free since he started eating solids (severe reflux when I had those things in my breastmilk).

 

A few months back, he was exposed to food allergens and his quirks and behaviors became very spectrumy. Just hoping that the specialists understand this so I can get a dx and he can get some help.

 



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My daughter likely wouldn't qualify as gifted, however she really excells in some areas, notably reading.  She knew the alphabet & the sounds each letter makes before she was 2.  She taught herself this through  a video as well as the leapfrog fridge magnet toy.  I have been working on her on reading though, & she started reading simple books at age 3.5. She just turned 4 last week & is reading at a grade one level.  I've been trying to get a good video of her reading but because she can read much more quickly than she can speak (& because we try not to put pressure on her by testing) it is hard to get it on tape. My daughter has Down syndrome.


She sounds like a very smart little girl!


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