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#31 of 35 Old 12-31-2011, 09:33 AM
 
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If I was to say my DD has a ___ word vocabulary, does this mean words she knows, as in cat and points to cat?  or does this include words she has only said once, and words she uses, with no necissary recognition...like a "repeat" of a word I say at the end of  a sentance? Also, does MEOW or MOO count?  lol  I have been trying to figure out the answer to this for our DD, but don't know if I can acurately.  Also if she says, Do that over here...I guess I would seperate the sentance and count each word? If all of these count as words, I don't think I am really going to ever know.

 

Umm,  my DD has around 200 words she clearly and correctly uses everyday, and speaks in 4 (or more?) word sentances.  I'm guessing her "vocabulary" is much higher though sometimes I can't understand her and have to listen really hard.  She "talks" non stop - even if to her self - I really mean non stop.  If she is not talking she is singing.  She just turned 17 months. 

 


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#32 of 35 Old 01-10-2012, 03:08 PM
 
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Well, yeah. If you say "reindeer", then she could point to the antlers on her headband. an example from my kids. or if you say "shirt" and she looks at her shirt. It doesn't need to be talking actually, it can just be if she can figure out what you're saying. she says dog, points to the dog when it comes to actual word usage. umm i think animal noises would only count if she spontaneously associates it with the cat in conversation, like "the cat says meow", or if someone says cat and she instantly says meow to demonstrate her understanding of what that person said. I don't kow if counting words like that, do, etc. count as words even though they ARE words, if i did that then my DDs' vocab would be higher then. i think words of everyday object qualifies more as words like bee, book, mom, etc. 


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#33 of 35 Old 01-10-2012, 09:40 PM
 
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Oh, wow.  That's a huge difference.  Thanks.  I think it might be a bit late for me to figure that out for DD.  But that is good to know for next time!fingersx.gif


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#34 of 35 Old 01-10-2012, 10:16 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mom2010 View Post

If I was to say my DD has a ___ word vocabulary, does this mean words she knows, as in cat and points to cat?  or does this include words she has only said once, and words she uses, with no necissary recognition...like a "repeat" of a word I say at the end of  a sentance? Also, does MEOW or MOO count?  lol  I have been trying to figure out the answer to this for our DD, but don't know if I can acurately.  Also if she says, Do that over here...I guess I would seperate the sentance and count each word? If all of these count as words, I don't think I am really going to ever know.

 

Umm,  my DD has around 200 words she clearly and correctly uses everyday, and speaks in 4 (or more?) word sentances.  I'm guessing her "vocabulary" is much higher though sometimes I can't understand her and have to listen really hard.  She "talks" non stop - even if to her self - I really mean non stop.  If she is not talking she is singing.  She just turned 18 months. 

 


Well, when people measure vocabulary, they usually measure receptive and expressive vocabulary separately. The receptive vocabulary is always larger than the expressive one (that's true for adults as well as children). For receptive, if they recognize the object or the action or the quality when you say a word, they know the word. Receptive vocabulary is usually tested using pictures and asking kids to point to the picture of the word. The expressive version shows a picture and asks the child to name it. This works pretty well for kids over 2 or 2 1/2, but not very well with 1 year olds. So, most 1 year olds are 'tested' with parent check-lists of things that parents think the child understands or says (they turn out to be more accurate than you might think).

 

Anything that's a consistent form linked with a consistent meaning counts. So, ds' word for garbage truck at age 18 months was "gaga ga". I counted it as a word. His articulation sucked, but he labeled the concept appropriately, his intonation was spot on, and he was always accurate in the number of syllables. Buffalo was bushishi, helicopter was wawawawa (why I didn't use the easier "chopper" with him I'll never know). I don't know how many other people could recognize his early words ,but dh and I could and he communicated quite effectively. (His articulation is still iffy at age 10, especially now that he's lost most of his molars!)

 

Animal noises count too. Meow and moo and woof and oink all count. To use these words, you have to learn a form that's specific to your language (Swedish pigs say "nuf nuf" not "oink") and link it with a meaning "that's what this animal says". Usually words that are only said once aren't counted. If she's just imitating a word at the end of your sentence, and you don't think she knows what it means, then no, it wouldn't count.

 

On the other hand, repeating new words that you just use is one way children learn or reinforce words. Tonight dd (age 7) was describing the first Warrior Cats book to me, and she was describing how the leader cats would go to a certain place (sorry, I was driving and didn't catch where) to talk to the "Star Clan" which were cats that had died. She was explaining that the leaders go to these cats because "they probably would know what a good thing to do was". I responded "oh, so they were wise?" "Yes," she replied, "they were wise, heavenly cats." It was clear to me (from her intonation and because I know her) that dd had the concept, but couldn't find the word for it. She's heard "wise" before, but I don't know whether she's had to use it very often (if at all).

 

So to make a long answer longer -- there isn't a strict definition of a "word" (actually I just gave that lecture today!), and it's hard to measure vocabulary knowledge exactly. Heck, there isn't even an accepted number of words in English (or any language)! Do you measure "run" and "running" as different words? What about "treat" and "treatment"? "berate" and "rate"? (Ok I'm kidding for the last one!)

 


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#35 of 35 Old 01-10-2012, 11:02 PM
 
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Originally Posted by LynnS6 View Post

 

On the other hand, repeating new words that you just use is one way children learn or reinforce words. Tonight dd (age 7) was describing the first Warrior Cats book to me, and she was describing how the leader cats would go to a certain place (sorry, I was driving and didn't catch where) to talk to the "Star Clan" which were cats that had died. She was explaining that the leaders go to these cats because "they probably would know what a good thing to do was". I responded "oh, so they were wise?" "Yes," she replied, "they were wise, heavenly cats." It was clear to me (from her intonation and because I know her) that dd had the concept, but couldn't find the word for it. She's heard "wise" before, but I don't know whether she's had to use it very often (if at all).


 

  I love that.  Cute!  innocent.gif

 

That clears things up quite a bit!  I would say then my guess of around 150+ words at 1yr might be about right.  Since 1, her vocabulary has just further amazed me, but it seems vocabulary is her thing!  praying.gif ROTFLMAO.gif


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