Spelling program--- question and advice needed - Mothering Forums

Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
#1 of 7 Old 03-30-2012, 11:35 AM - Thread Starter
 
KCMichigan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 925
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

I am curious:

My girls (6y 4m) 1st grade teacher does differentiated spelling, that is the teacher gathers words for kids individually. My daughters teacher does spelling based on the DOLCH word list and simply goes down it for spelling (each teacher is allowed to do what they want- no formal program. This is what my girls teacher does). They must be able to read the list. Then they practice spelling words they miss on a pretest so that they do not have tests on words they already can spell.

DD1 list:    DD2 list

excited      which
actually     enough
beautiful    pocket
favorite      because
because     friend

This seems tough, but I like it since they are learning new words all the time and I can see it in their writing. But both girls seem to be good spellers and have had similar words since January. They have been successful with this program and love the challenge!



That said-- the 2nd grade teachers as a team decided to all use a Spectrum spelling list (at this school) and some related curriculum words. The whole class gets the the same words, mastery or not.

I peeked at the words for next year (at this same time for next year): They were gift, rift, lift, left, swift, craft, circle, cone, and prism. 



I am wondering how DDs will react next year when most of the words they already know how to spell. I really like what they are doing this year and think it has helped a lot, combined with Words Their Way word exploration program, both DDs writing has come so very far this year! They love to write (which makes me happy since writing was such a chore when I was younger).

What program does your kids classroom use? Do you like it? 

 

What woudl you do?

 

 

I really like the math , science ,writing, & spelling (unique to the teacher)....not too thrilled at the reading- which is mostly them reading to themselves or to other high readers (there is a little group of six 1st graders reading at 3rd grade+ level) while teacher works with lower groups. But over all pretty happy, that said- it seems to be teacher dependent on the reading/spelling programs as long as they are working toward state mandated guidelines....

 

Any suggestion?

KCMichigan is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
#2 of 7 Old 03-30-2012, 12:08 PM
 
ollyoxenfree's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 4,895
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)

 

Is there any way to persuade the 2nd grade teachers to reconsider? Do your dds have IEPs? (I seem to recall they both have dual diagnoses, but maybe I'm confusing you with someone else - if so, apologies). It might be worth addressing this issue in terms of appropriate curriculum accommodations in the IEPs.   

 

The 1st grade teacher seems to be providing a suitable, fairly routine  accommodation. They have a more challenging activity, appropriate to their ability and achievement, in conjunction with pre-testing to avoid an unnecessary waste of time on both the students and teacher's part (why test and grade at a much lower level than the student can manage?).

 

What is their usual reaction to busywork - because that is what it looks like the 2nd grade spelling program will be for them. If they tend to resist, get defiant or bored and unmotivated with pointless, repetitive work, this seems like an issue to address on the IEP.

 

Perhaps, if the teachers insist on this curriculum rather than adapting something at their level, one compromise would be to have your dds write a pretest near the beginning of the year. If they do well enough, they could skip the spelling tests and do something else with their time. 

 

I don't have much else to contribute. My own experience isn't too helpful because it's somewhat different on the spelling issue. Despite being a fluent, advanced, voracious reader, my own DD was (is) an atrocious speller. At this point, I wonder whether she would have benefited from more rigorous, regular spelling programs in her early schooling. I know many will say that the best way to learn spelling is simply to read a lot, but that hasn't been a complete answer for her.  

ollyoxenfree is offline  
#3 of 7 Old 03-30-2012, 12:18 PM - Thread Starter
 
KCMichigan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 925
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)


Quote:
Originally Posted by ollyoxenfree View Post

 

Is there any way to persuade the 2nd grade teachers to reconsider? Do your dds have IEPs? (I seem to recall they both have dual diagnoses, but maybe I'm confusing you with someone else - if so, apologies). It might be worth addressing this issue in terms of appropriate curriculum accommodations in the IEPs.   

 

 Doubtful- to be honest. They work as a team (as do the 1st grade teachers) and I have heard rumblings that they are not as accommodating as the K/1st teams. We will see.

 

Good memory. Both DD do have special needs- but only one has a 504. 504 is for a physical disability and has no academic components. Our area does not do IEPs for GT and/or a students with disabilities that are at or above grade level-- then it is a 504 for the most part.

 

 

 

What is their usual reaction to busywork - because that is what it looks like the 2nd grade spelling program will be for them. If they tend to resist, get defiant or bored and unmotivated with pointless, repetitive work, this seems like an issue to address on the IEP.

 

DD1 is "enthusiastic" (haha! She is fairly loud and vocal on what she knows) and can be very chatty when bored. DD2 just day dreams or doodles, which is easier for the teacher to handle behavioralwise, but is not a good solution either.

 

Perhaps, if the teachers insist on this curriculum rather than adapting something at their level, one compromise would be to have your dds write a pretest near the beginning of the year. If they do well enough, they could skip the spelling tests and do something else with their time. 

 

I am thinking this is the route we will go or at least attempt for. It will depend on the teacher and I am not familiar with the 2nd grade teachers since we are new to the area.

 

 

Despite being a fluent, advanced, voracious reader, my own DD was (is) an atrocious speller. I know many will say that the best way to learn spelling is simply to read a lot, but that hasn't been a complete answer for her.  

 

This was my issue. I am/was a voracious reader...but still to this day am an awful speller! Moving around, I did not get consistent instruction on rules/patterns/etc so I tend to spell phonetically. The program the girls school uses (separate from spelling program) to explore words is GREAT (Words Their Way). It is leveled and it really allows them to explore relationships between words (and their spelling) and patterns. It is part of the Language Arts/writing curriculum.



 

KCMichigan is offline  
#4 of 7 Old 03-30-2012, 12:28 PM
 
ollyoxenfree's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 4,895
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)

 

Ah, that's too bad that there isn't a formal mechanism to deal with it. Nevertheless, formal process isn't necessary where there is common sense. Hopefully, the teachers will understand that making your dds participate in this spelling program will be just as much a waste of time for them as it is for your dds. 

 

It should help if you collect their spelling tests and examples of their written work as they continue this year, so you can demonstrate their abilities to next year's teachers. Good luck and hopefully someone else will have some more ideas for you. 

ollyoxenfree is offline  
#5 of 7 Old 07-04-2012, 02:50 PM
 
Dancergirl21's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 1
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

As a student (recently graduated high school) I hated spelling tests because of the same issues your daughters have with words being ridiculously easy. Although I was not in the gifted program at my elementary schools (I switched too often to be re-tested), my teachers knew that I was a year ahead. In order to challenge myself I made a deal with my teachers, I could pick my own words as long as I put the words broken down into phonics next to it for the student quizzing me if the teacher was not available. This allowed me to learn words that I would actually need without getting frustrated and bored. 

Dancergirl21 is offline  
#6 of 7 Old 07-05-2012, 01:21 AM
 
domesticidyll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 221
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

I'm wondering if the teacher would be willing to let your DDs work at their own pace in class if (a) you send in workbooks they can choose to do instead of in-class work, and (b) they take the regular weekly tests (I'm guessing this is just a weekly writing ten words, or something?) so she can see that they are doing acceptably well. (We homeschool now, but did a year of public kinder... I was hesitant initially to send in enrichment work, but in time realized everyone was happier when I could just send in things that were the right level and kind of work instead of waiting for her to create individualized work. This is actually a pretty good scenario, IME, if the teacher is willing.)

 

Workbooks we like:

All About Homophones (expensive, but multi-leveled, and easy to do independently)

Spell of Words (meant for struggling older kids, but really interesting workbook on structure of spelling--why and when to double--has been useful for my analytical learner, not for everyone, not great probably for great, intuitive spellers)

How to Teach Spelling (not fantastic, but fine and relatively inexpensive sequential program)

Editor-in-Chief (grammar, not spelling, and not a stand-alone program, but kids seem to like it and it does have a spelling component, so might work as spelling-related independent work)

 

Something like Word Roots (vocab) might also work as language-arts enrichment, and potentially not duplicate work they are expected to do.

 

Not sure any of these is optimal for your kids, but you can find many spelling programs at Rainbow Resources, and find discussions of them at Well-Trained Mind forums (both homeschool resources, but friendly to afterschooling).

 

Heather

domesticidyll is offline  
#7 of 7 Old 07-17-2012, 11:05 AM
 
nerdmomma6885's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 58
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

My DDs were not formally educated in spelling, at least not beyond working in Wordly Wise workbooks and weekly spelling quizzes, for the most part they got it from reading so much. But maybe you could challenge them at home by looking up commonly misspelled words and most used words in the English language, all levels. But you could use this website for spelling too, my oldest DD used it for practicing for the schoolwide spelling bee. It's for gifted kids, all levels, so she should be challenged. Actually, I can't find it. But you could always go on Hoagies': http://www.hoagiesgifted.org/language.htm


Raising three crazy girls in a loving home in IL. One notes.gif lil writer, bellyhair.gifActor (not belly dancer! Please!) and of course, our lil one says asl.gifgrouphug.gif "We're all in this together"... (high school musical-- EEP!).

nerdmomma6885 is offline  
Reply

Tags
Gifted Child

User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off