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#1 of 64 Old 06-16-2012, 02:52 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I have a 6 year old daughter. She has never been tested as gifted but I believe she is. Her memory is amazing. She has been reading since she was four years old, and the school tested her reading levels and determined she was at the level expected of fifth graders. Anything she hears once she knows permanently.  She loves science and math and literature so we give her more and more everyday. The problem is she is bored at school. During lessons she is spaced out daydreaming. When the teachers engages her she is happy and really loves going to school. They were going to skip her up a few grades but maturity wise she is still a kindergarten. She starts first grade in the fall, but we know she has already learned what will be taught. I want to supplement her public school education, because she does not want to do full home school. I was wondering if anyone here had any suggestions. 

 

Thanks

 

Michelle



"We all want progress, but if you're on the wrong road, progress means doing an about-turn and walking back to the right road; in that case, the man who turns back soonest is the most progressive. " - C.S Lewis

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#2 of 64 Old 06-16-2012, 03:22 PM
 
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I would be very hesitant about providing academic enrichment in the after-school hours. Even if what goes on at school isn't challenging, it's structured and there are specific expectations imposed upon her. Kids need unstructured, creative, fallow, imaginative, physical, play, social and family time. So if you want to do a sort of "afterschooling," I would keep it very un-school-like in structure and format. So ... puppetry and gymnastics and independent reading and piano could be great, but working through a math enrichment program or doing Saturday Mandarin School might not be so great. 

 

Does your school district have any provision for part-time school attendance? Our school does this in theory, although in practice it only works at the high school level since the elementary and middle school programs are very organic in their schedules and cross-curricular in their pedagogy, meaning it's virtually impossible to carve out specific blocks / subjects for attendance. Still, your school may be different in structure, so if they allow part-time attendance that might give you the freedom to have her move ahead in math instead of attending 1st grade math class.

 

Alternatively I would keep an open mind about full-time homeschooling. I know your dd really loves going to school when she's engaged, but if she finds less interest in 1st grade she might discover she loves homeschooling just as much, or more! My youngest dd is 9 and none of her formerly-homeschooled older siblings have been at home with her this year, so last fall she vascillated a little about homeschooling vs. school. However, we've been able to cater more to her individual interests as the year has gone on, and she's had some totally amazing experiences that have made school pale by comparison.

 

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#3 of 64 Old 06-16-2012, 05:19 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I would be very hesitant about providing academic enrichment in the after-school hours. Even if what goes on at school isn't challenging, it's structured and there are specific expectations imposed upon her. Kids need unstructured, creative, fallow, imaginative, physical, play, social and family time. So if you want to do a sort of "afterschooling," I would keep it very un-school-like in structure and format. So ... puppetry and gymnastics and independent reading and piano could be great, but working through a math enrichment program or doing Saturday Mandarin School might not be so great. 

 

Does your school district have any provision for part-time school attendance? Our school does this in theory, although in practice it only works at the high school level since the elementary and middle school programs are very organic in their schedules and cross-curricular in their pedagogy, meaning it's virtually impossible to carve out specific blocks / subjects for attendance. Still, your school may be different in structure, so if they allow part-time attendance that might give you the freedom to have her move ahead in math instead of attending 1st grade math class.

 

Alternatively I would keep an open mind about full-time homeschooling. I know your dd really loves going to school when she's engaged, but if she finds less interest in 1st grade she might discover she loves homeschooling just as much, or more! My youngest dd is 9 and none of her formerly-homeschooled older siblings have been at home with her this year, so last fall she vascillated a little about homeschooling vs. school. However, we've been able to cater more to her individual interests as the year has gone on, and she's had some totally amazing experiences that have made school pale by comparison.

 

Miranda

What I am thinking about doing at home is sorta something that already goes on naturally. When she comes home she goes straight to her books by choice. She asks in depth questions that sometimes require research. Her play is naturally based on animal biology, astronomy, history or something. Even if she is daydreaming about fairy tales there is some sort of academic base. For example today we took her out to eat so her grandparents could give her a few gifts for her great end of the year report card.  Her conversation revolved around DNA similarities among orangutans and humans as well as something she watched on a PBS show about Slovenia. She wants to know more, and I want to give her more. Of course we go to the museums, the zoo, aquariums, national parks, the grocery store, the farmers market, church, etc. She wants to know more though, she soaks up everything. The program I am thinking about is Moving Beyond the Page at least for summer trial and book based not an online curriculum.

 

There is no ability for part-time schooling in our district. Kindergarten was like that, but 1st grade will be all day. She does love school, and I just don't want to take her out. I guess once she is in 1st grade maybe I will see things differently. But even still I just don't want to have her at home, school is so enriching, not just academically, but socially, inter-personally, and she learns many lessons there. Also her friendships, and the stability  that comes from being part of our community, not that we wouldn't be otherwise, but her school faces our home. When the bells ring we can hear them with the windows closed. Kids walk by daily :-) 

 

Obviously, I still don't have a clue what I am going to do. I probably won't take her out of school at all, but I still want to feed her mind, because she is hungry for knowledge. I guess It'll take time for me to figure it out. Unschooling...I think I'll have to work on what that looks like, maybe I am doing it already and I don't even know it :)

 

Michelle



"We all want progress, but if you're on the wrong road, progress means doing an about-turn and walking back to the right road; in that case, the man who turns back soonest is the most progressive. " - C.S Lewis

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#4 of 64 Old 06-17-2012, 12:38 AM
 
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Just agreeing with above post. "Afterschooling" isn't really a best option. It doesn't fix the 6-7 hours they are in school and after awhile, they can resent "more school." Art, music, self-directed reading and learning maybe... I wouldn't try to fit in more traditional academics for sure.

 

I'd look further into your school options. What are they offering in terms of differentiation or subject acceleration? Do they offer her an open-ended curriculum (free choice of reading material, essay/creative writing as opposed to worksheets, ect.) Are their any alternative schools in your area... project based, immersion, ect? How supportive has the school been in meeting her needs? If she's getting none of this, find out how she can.

 

We've had a very positive experiences through grade 8 for our kids but they are/were also in a highly flexible and quality district along with having kids good at communicating their needs with staff and willing to bring open-ended work to their own level. I was also able to pretty much live at school in the elementary years tutoring other children to give the teacher more time with mine. Unfortunately, DD's high school district is not flexible at all and it's been a train wreck. Basically, I'd focus on fixing her class time first.


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#5 of 64 Old 06-17-2012, 05:46 AM
 
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Trust your instincts.  Mothers have an intuitive sense when it comes to their children, and no one knows them better than you..  Some schools offer gifted classes.  If your school does not, there should be schools near by that do. Because your child is gifted, they usually make allowances. 
 

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#6 of 64 Old 06-17-2012, 08:03 AM
 
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Hello, I homeschooled my kids from birth. With homeschooling you can do a lot in a short time which leaves the majority if the day for play that is so necessary for brain and social development. I was not in the camp of pushing formal academics down to little kids yet what we did in our normal living and a few special homeschool planned activities was more than the preschool and elementary kids did in school! My 2 kids are bright and bith have high ams for their futures. They are 12 and close to 15 now, rising grade 10 and 7.

If your daughter learns and remembers so easily then homeschooling would be a breeze for you and enriching for her.

With after schooling academics at home you take time away from doing other things, yet if all she was doing after school was something sub-par like watching tv then it would be better but I bet that is not how you have her spending her time. If you try after schooling you will see how much can get done with 1:1 teaching then you may ask yourself why waste the bulk of a day in school if she can learn more a home with you in a couple of hours!

Homeschooling is a big responsibility that not everyone wants to take on, but remember you can always try it and quit if it is not working out. You can try it for 1 year, you do not have to commit for the whole 12 grades!

Good luck with the decision.

ChrustineMM homeschool mother of sons aged 15 & 12 - my blog: http://thethinkingmother.blogspot.com/
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#7 of 64 Old 06-17-2012, 01:29 PM
 
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Originally Posted by browneyedmamasf View Post

...because she does not want to do full home school...

She doesn't know what it would be like; are you familiar enough with her options to convey it to her?  "Home schooling" is not a very descriptive phrase because it is so individual to each family.  

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#8 of 64 Old 06-17-2012, 04:17 PM
 
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My thought is to enrich her life with open ended, project based learning.

 

Some ideas:

  • Visiting museums, historic sites, galleries, nature areas, etc on weekends and during the summer
  • Play board games and doing puzzles together (board games are a GREAT way to build math skills in a mellow way)
  • Listen to different kinds of music together (for a while, we listened to classical music during dinner, listening to one composer for a while until they had a feel for him, and then moving on. My kids also enjoyed the Beethoven Lived Upstairs series of CDs.
  • Visit the library together weekly and bring home books on things that seem interesting to her at the moment.
  • Encourage her to take classes in an area that delights and challenges her -- such as foreign language or music or horse back riding. Whatever. It's all good. I do think it's overall good for a child for whom school comes easily to have SOMETHING in in their lives that they have to work at, preferably something they enjoy and value. Or else they risk thinking that everything is supposed to be easy for them and then getting all freaked out when they finally come across something that requires effort. Learning to take joy in effort is part of what sets a kid up for a happy adulthood. (some kids find Sports or Music as the best way to add challenge to their lives)
  • Doing projecty things together -- such as growing a garden, cooking, building things, sewing, whatever. These are all quite educational.
  • Providing open-ended obviously educational things for your child -- something like a circuit set or other hands on science or math materials.
  • Although I'm not a huge fan of anything that that resembles school at home for kids who've already spent the day in school, there are a couple of math resources that I really like for younger children. Family Math (which is a big book full of hands on games and activities) http://www.amazon.com/Family-Math-Jean-Kerr-Stenmark/dp/0912511060
  • Miquon Math (which is a math program designed to be used in gifted pullout programs starting in first grade, but is very popular with homeschoolers) Miquon is oddly open-ended for a workbook. I also like it because it fosters a different way of thinking about math, not just moving faster. http://www.sonlight.com/miquon.html
  • Keep reading to your child. Even though she reads well on her own, read wonderful books to her ANYWAY as a shared experience. I personally think this is one of the best things we can do with our kids, gifted or not.

 

 

I don't mean this to be a list of what you *should*  do (you would drive yourself and your daughter crazy. dizzy.gif  ) Rather, as some ideas to get your creative juices flowing about possible ways to enrich your DDs life and foster her learning. I believe that learning can be a delight, and that it naturally is for children. I personally don't believe that the kind of activities on this list would harm a child who is spending the day in school, unless they are undertaken in a forceful rather than a joyful way. Pick and chose, and help your DD find her bliss.

 

We've homeschooled, used traditional public school, and my kids currently attend a project-based private school. Both my kids learn better in a group. They are more motivated and energized. I'm also more ready to engage in the kind of things listed above when I get real breaks for them. Different things work for different kids and different families, and even at different stages. But school CAN work, and you can actively engage with your child in interesting ways in the off times.

 

Good luck

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#9 of 64 Old 06-17-2012, 05:48 PM
 
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  • Miquon Math (which is a math program designed to be used in gifted pullout programs starting in first grade, but is very popular with homeschoolers) Miquon is oddly open-ended for a workbook. I also like it because it fosters a different way of thinking about math, not just moving faster. http://www.sonlight.com/miquon.html

 

Miquon was just the regular math curriculum developed at the Miquon School (a progressive school, but not a "gifted school") in the 1960s. I agree with you, though, that its open-endedness and conceptual emphasis are well suited to gifted students.

 

Miranda

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#10 of 64 Old 06-18-2012, 10:11 AM
 
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I think it's possible to do academic enrichment outside of school in a positive and beneficial and engaging manner. 

 

The key is finding activities that your child enjoys and wants to do. I'd pay attention to what your child is interested in and let her lead you as much as possible. 

 

Children who are engaged in learning often don't distinguish between "academic" and "fun" activities - they have fun doing academic activities.  To them, it's all just part of life.

 

These kids like to explore academic subjects, sometimes by themselves at home and sometimes in organized programs. They may be enthusiastic about the opportunity to participate in a different venue. Especially because they are learning along with a group of peers who are also interested in the topic and having fun too.  Learning about amphibians and reptiles can be pretty cool if you get the chance to do it at summer camp at the zoo with a bunch of kids who also love slimy, scaly critters.  History can be a little more fascinating if you are spending time with the mummies at the museum during a Saturday morning program, getting behind-the-scenes access that isn't available to regular visitors.  

 

My kids learned about Shakespeare at an after-school program at the library and also by attending performances at an outdoor theatre in the park every summer, starting when they were in elementary school. They had a lot of fun with Shakespeare long before it became an assigned topic in English lit. so they don't have the same antipathy that I see in so many who first encounter the plays in school.

 

I wouldn't avoid all academic enrichment after school. I would just be careful about selecting the activities and make sure they are appealing to your DD. If you are looking for organized activities, I'd seek out quality programs with good instructors.  

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#11 of 64 Old 06-18-2012, 10:52 AM
 
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These kids like to explore academic subjects, sometimes by themselves at home and sometimes in organized programs. 

 

I agree. I was just cautioning about doing so in an school-like, structured manner. Academic enrichment outside of school hours should be driven by the child's interests. When looking at organized activities, the structure should probably be flexible and the tasks open-ended; a non-institutional setting would be helpful as well. 

 

Miranda

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#12 of 64 Old 06-19-2012, 11:05 AM
 
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I agree. I was just cautioning about doing so in an school-like, structured manner. Academic enrichment outside of school hours should be driven by the child's interests. When looking at organized activities, the structure should probably be flexible and the tasks open-ended; a non-institutional setting would be helpful as well. 

 

Miranda

 

 

To be fair, there were a few posts with generally discouraging statements about the idea of academic enrichment or afterschooling. Some people may not read further or consider that it is possible, even with a structured program, to find an inspiring or engaging connection between what a child is learning in school and what they do out of school. 

 

 

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Originally Posted by browneyedmamasf View Post

What I am thinking about doing at home is sorta something that already goes on naturally. When she comes home she goes straight to her books by choice. She asks in depth questions that sometimes require research. Her play is naturally based on animal biology, astronomy, history or something. Even if she is daydreaming about fairy tales there is some sort of academic base. 

 

OP, your DD sounds a lot like my children at that age. They were excited and interested in what they discovered at school and wanted to share it and learn more when they got home. The school lessons on different topics were often a springboard to a deeper and broader exploration at home. Sometimes we used school-like resources (children's encylopaedias, workbooks, computer games) to fill that need. Sometimes they joined after-school or weekend or summer camp programs. As long as it's child-led and you are sensitive to whether she starts losing interest or becomes overwhelmed, and she's otherwise enjoying a mix of open-ended, unstructured activities, it's all good.

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#13 of 64 Old 06-19-2012, 01:29 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Hello, I homeschooled my kids from birth. With homeschooling you can do a lot in a short time which leaves the majority if the day for play that is so necessary for brain and social development. I was not in the camp of pushing formal academics down to little kids yet what we did in our normal living and a few special homeschool planned activities was more than the preschool and elementary kids did in school! My 2 kids are bright and bith have high ams for their futures. They are 12 and close to 15 now, rising grade 10 and 7.
If your daughter learns and remembers so easily then homeschooling would be a breeze for you and enriching for her.
With after schooling academics at home you take time away from doing other things, yet if all she was doing after school was something sub-par like watching tv then it would be better but I bet that is not how you have her spending her time. If you try after schooling you will see how much can get done with 1:1 teaching then you may ask yourself why waste the bulk of a day in school if she can learn more a home with you in a couple of hours!
Homeschooling is a big responsibility that not everyone wants to take on, but remember you can always try it and quit if it is not working out. You can try it for 1 year, you do not have to commit for the whole 12 grades!
Good luck with the decision.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by pigpokey View Post

She doesn't know what it would be like; are you familiar enough with her options to convey it to her?  "Home schooling" is not a very descriptive phrase because it is so individual to each family.  

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by romacox View Post

Trust your instincts.  Mothers have an intuitive sense when it comes to their children, and no one knows them better than you..  Some schools offer gifted classes.  If your school does not, there should be schools near by that do. Because your child is gifted, they usually make allowances. 
 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Linda on the move View Post

My thought is to enrich her life with open ended, project based learning.

 

Some ideas:

  • Visiting museums, historic sites, galleries, nature areas, etc on weekends and during the summer
  • Play board games and doing puzzles together (board games are a GREAT way to build math skills in a mellow way)
  • Listen to different kinds of music together (for a while, we listened to classical music during dinner, listening to one composer for a while until they had a feel for him, and then moving on. My kids also enjoyed the Beethoven Lived Upstairs series of CDs.
  • Visit the library together weekly and bring home books on things that seem interesting to her at the moment.
  • Encourage her to take classes in an area that delights and challenges her -- such as foreign language or music or horse back riding. Whatever. It's all good. I do think it's overall good for a child for whom school comes easily to have SOMETHING in in their lives that they have to work at, preferably something they enjoy and value. Or else they risk thinking that everything is supposed to be easy for them and then getting all freaked out when they finally come across something that requires effort. Learning to take joy in effort is part of what sets a kid up for a happy adulthood. (some kids find Sports or Music as the best way to add challenge to their lives)
  • Doing projecty things together -- such as growing a garden, cooking, building things, sewing, whatever. These are all quite educational.
  • Providing open-ended obviously educational things for your child -- something like a circuit set or other hands on science or math materials.
  • Although I'm not a huge fan of anything that that resembles school at home for kids who've already spent the day in school, there are a couple of math resources that I really like for younger children. Family Math (which is a big book full of hands on games and activities) http://www.amazon.com/Family-Math-Jean-Kerr-Stenmark/dp/0912511060
  • Miquon Math (which is a math program designed to be used in gifted pullout programs starting in first grade, but is very popular with homeschoolers) Miquon is oddly open-ended for a workbook. I also like it because it fosters a different way of thinking about math, not just moving faster. http://www.sonlight.com/miquon.html
  • Keep reading to your child. Even though she reads well on her own, read wonderful books to her ANYWAY as a shared experience. I personally think this is one of the best things we can do with our kids, gifted or not.

 

 

I don't mean this to be a list of what you *should*  do (you would drive yourself and your daughter crazy. dizzy.gif  ) Rather, as some ideas to get your creative juices flowing about possible ways to enrich your DDs life and foster her learning. I believe that learning can be a delight, and that it naturally is for children. I personally don't believe that the kind of activities on this list would harm a child who is spending the day in school, unless they are undertaken in a forceful rather than a joyful way. Pick and chose, and help your DD find her bliss.

 

We've homeschooled, used traditional public school, and my kids currently attend a project-based private school. Both my kids learn better in a group. They are more motivated and energized. I'm also more ready to engage in the kind of things listed above when I get real breaks for them. Different things work for different kids and different families, and even at different stages. But school CAN work, and you can actively engage with your child in interesting ways in the off times.

 

Good luck

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ollyoxenfree View Post

I think it's possible to do academic enrichment outside of school in a positive and beneficial and engaging manner. 

 

The key is finding activities that your child enjoys and wants to do. I'd pay attention to what your child is interested in and let her lead you as much as possible. 

 

Children who are engaged in learning often don't distinguish between "academic" and "fun" activities - they have fun doing academic activities.  To them, it's all just part of life.

 

These kids like to explore academic subjects, sometimes by themselves at home and sometimes in organized programs. They may be enthusiastic about the opportunity to participate in a different venue. Especially because they are learning along with a group of peers who are also interested in the topic and having fun too.  Learning about amphibians and reptiles can be pretty cool if you get the chance to do it at summer camp at the zoo with a bunch of kids who also love slimy, scaly critters.  History can be a little more fascinating if you are spending time with the mummies at the museum during a Saturday morning program, getting behind-the-scenes access that isn't available to regular visitors.  

 

My kids learned about Shakespeare at an after-school program at the library and also by attending performances at an outdoor theatre in the park every summer, starting when they were in elementary school. They had a lot of fun with Shakespeare long before it became an assigned topic in English lit. so they don't have the same antipathy that I see in so many who first encounter the plays in school.

 

I wouldn't avoid all academic enrichment after school. I would just be careful about selecting the activities and make sure they are appealing to your DD. If you are looking for organized activities, I'd seek out quality programs with good instructors.  

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ollyoxenfree View Post

 

 

To be fair, there were a few posts with generally discouraging statements about the idea of academic enrichment or afterschooling. Some people may not read further or consider that it is possible, even with a structured program, to find an inspiring or engaging connection between what a child is learning in school and what they do out of school. 

 

 

 

OP, your DD sounds a lot like my children at that age. They were excited and interested in what they discovered at school and wanted to share it and learn more when they got home. The school lessons on different topics were often a springboard to a deeper and broader exploration at home. Sometimes we used school-like resources (children's encylopaedias, workbooks, computer games) to fill that need. Sometimes they joined after-school or weekend or summer camp programs. As long as it's child-led and you are sensitive to whether she starts losing interest or becomes overwhelmed, and she's otherwise enjoying a mix of open-ended, unstructured activities, it's all good.

Okay wow, that was a lot of help and support. Thank goodness for all of you guys it really helped me understand what type of environment I am looking to create for my daughter at home, my desire to keep her in school, as well as my hope to enrich her academically according to what she is interested in.

 

@ Christinemm  My daughter does have some television time PBS kids or some sort of nature or science based show, for example we watch the entire Frozen Planet over a number of weeks. But usually after school she goes straight to her room and chills out over books. Those books are typically science based, her favorites are her animal atlas and world atlas. She also enjoys reading her books about history and myths. She enjoys doing science projects, she has a book filled with them. I was interested in way to develop this natural interest that was clear.

 

@Pigpokey I don't think my daughter is interested in being home schooled because that means she will no longer be in class with her Friends, no more recess with friends, no more group projects with friends, no more field day, field trips, or class parties with friends. Yes she can make more friends, and even maintain the ones that she does have, but she will no longer be in school with them, I know my daughter and that would devastate her.

 

@Romacox Thanks for that, sometimes I forget that, I have done well with her so far, she is an awesome kid, naturally curious about the sciences & literature, today she has a ballet recital as well, and I just sometimes forget this fact, in my district the gifted program does not start to 3rd grade, so I am going to keep looking and pressuring the school. Thanks again.

 

@ Linda on the move The first four of your bullet points are somethings we have been doing since she was about 3 years old. We continue to do them now. The fifth one though really struck me. She was in karate a couple years ago and quit, she felt it was to hard for her and we let her quit, she has been in ballet for a year, it has been challenging for her and she has not given up, but I am going to see what else she is interested in, I think Chorus and maybe even horseback riding, I am going to talk to her and see what she is interested in. Also the suggestion to get open ended things like a circuit board or something like that are things I hadn't;t thought of, I will do that! I will also look into that math program, and your right about reading I totally agree with you, I will continue to read to her :) I enjoy just as much as she does! Thank you so much for your support, I really like how you added at the end that it's possible for school to work and I can still engage my daughter in the off times. Thanks so much!!!

 

@ollyoxenfree I totally agree with letting her lead, she always has done that. You are so right about her play, academic and fun are not separate to her, they are the same thing!!! I am so excited you get that, so many people just don't!!! OMG I was so relived to find that other people see that! Your entire post spoke volumes to me, it was just so what I was looking for. My daughter loves science, she loves learning about the world, the countries, the cultures, everything. I took her to the Art Museum, she fell in love with Van Gogh, so she wanted to learn more about him. I guess what I am saying is that I just want to be able to clearly pull all these things together for her in an engaging way, I want to be able to connect the dots and manage it all, she loves it, sometimes I have it all together and sometimes I don't and she just wants more. Once she came home and asked me about DNA well, I am a Human Development student, not a Geneticist, I had to tell her we would have to look it up, so together we researched DNA and learned about all these different things which of course she expected me to expand on, lol I couldn't but that God for Khan Academy, because I was able to search for what she wanted to know and get it to her :) 

 

I really appreciate all the comments here. I have a lot to think about. If anyone here knows of a home school program I could at least loosely follow so that I could teach her in a linear way about science, history, etc let me know. Of course it'll be in an unschool style, but it will have a structure, the material anyways :) She still looks forward to coming home and learning about something new or doing a science project or cooking with me etc, and I would like to have some materials prepared :)

 

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#14 of 64 Old 06-20-2012, 07:10 AM
 
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I really appreciate all the comments here. I have a lot to think about. If anyone here knows of a home school program I could at least loosely follow so that I could teach her in a linear way about science, history, etc let me know. Of course it'll be in an unschool style, but it will have a structure, the material anyways :) She still looks forward to coming home and learning about something new or doing a science project or cooking with me etc, and I would like to have some materials prepared :)

 

 

Here's where I get a little hesitant and echo pp's cautionary comments. That doesn't sound very child-lead and it sounds different from what I've discussed. One tactic I used often was to listen to what they were telling me about what they did in school or what they were interested in. Basically, I would ask them to teach me and I would be quiet and pay attention. Then I might contribute a few leading questions -  "I wonder what would happen if...." or "Why does it...." or "Why not....." etc. If they also wondered and wanted to know more, we'd go from there.

 

It is amazing to watch them soak up information and see how excited they are about learning and to share that enthusiasm with them. There will be also be times when they need to step back a little and aren't quite so enthusiastic. If you assume a teaching role and set the pace with prepared materials, rather than facilitating and supporting them as their interests evolve and emerge, then you may miss those times. I don't mean to be discouraging, because as I stated earlier I think academic enrichment can be positive and done well, but it does take some careful balancing.  

 

That also doesn't mean that I think it's a bad idea to have some good resources, reference materials and activity/craft books on hand. I'm not really familiar with specific homeschooling curricula though.  

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Here's where I get a little hesitant and echo pp's cautionary comments. That doesn't sound very child-lead and it sounds different from what I've discussed. One tactic I used often was to listen to what they were telling me about what they did in school or what they were interested in. Basically, I would ask them to teach me and I would be quiet and pay attention. Then I might contribute a few leading questions -  "I wonder what would happen if...." or "Why does it...." or "Why not....." etc. If they also wondered and wanted to know more, we'd go from there.

 

It is amazing to watch them soak up information and see how excited they are about learning and to share that enthusiasm with them. There will be also be times when they need to step back a little and aren't quite so enthusiastic. If you assume a teaching role and set the pace with prepared materials, rather than facilitating and supporting them as their interests evolve and emerge, then you may miss those times. I don't mean to be discouraging, because as I stated earlier I think academic enrichment can be positive and done well, but it does take some careful balancing.  

 

That also doesn't mean that I think it's a bad idea to have some good resources, reference materials and activity/craft books on hand. I'm not really familiar with specific homeschooling curricula though.  

I am not sure what sort of school your child has experience with, but I live in a low income district, science is not taught in the lower elementary grades. They teach to the test. My daughters interests are not created by her class they come from our trips and the books she reads as well as her natural curiosity about the world. Her interests shape our home environment, but her interest in the sciences or math should be taught in a linear way, it should not be all across the board. Of course she gets books she wants on various sciences. But again I don't know everything, having a home school program as a reference is a good idea especially when we live in the district we do. I am sure we have an awesome balance, but again I don't want to be jumping all over the board when teaching her things. She sees me as a teacher and her mother at the same time, my child and I do have engaging conversations about various things, but sometimes she just wants straight information, I am not sure what the big deal is in relation to using a good home school program as a reference, I never said anything about forcing her to do it all. I just would like to follow standards for her age, and in simple terms, lots of the things we find for example on genetics are not geared to her age level, just because she is really smart does not mean that she is all of a sudden mature.  Again, does anyone know of a good home school program book based not online ?

 

 

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I think the danger is that she is in a structured environment all day long at school - so coming home to curricula is more time spent in a structured environment.  A curriculum IS structured, by definition, and that is part of what you like about it - you admit that it is "linear."  Well...her whole school day is linear.  You run the risk (IMO) of filling her entire day with academics that are handed to her in an organized, linear fashion.  Spooned out bit by bit.

 

I want to be clear that I think it's great your DD finds academics "fun" - that she has an insatiable desire to learn more! thumb.gif  I was such a child once - I was a total nerd and devoured everything I could get my hands on, often unchallenged by my gifted classes, coming home to read, read, and read some more.  Academics were absolutely all tied up in what I found to be enjoyable - from acid rain test kits to Egyptian hieroglyphic stamps to reading biographies of famous artists.  

 

That said, I think it may help to view your DD's afterschool studies as an "independent study" period.  She is in linear, academic, school mode all day.  She needs some time to dabble in this or that (yes, even science or math - they don't have to be taught in a linear fashion - in fact, many areas are interconnected).  She needs the freedom to spend her time on one concept if she wants to, or follow an idea freely across multiple subjects.  In short - to think in a way that is free-wheeling and inspired, not linear.  Do you have library access?  I would think finding relevant books that way (that are written to a specific subject, not just generalized and watered down to a specific grade level only) may be much more helpful than a pre-packaged curriculum.  

 

The other thing is...kids need lots of free time, creative time, make believe time.  It helps them roll new concepts and knowledge around in their brain, for one (one can't always just fill the tank - that is only one way of learning).  If you can't get the answer right away, have your DD use creative thinking to brainstorm some possibilities - and then think of ways to test them, if she can.

 

Academics are only one facet of a kid - involving primarily their brain, however passionate they may be!  Kids need help to be well-balanced little people.  If you had a kid who loved being active and was obsessed with sports, you would still read to them and work on their schoolwork - in the same way, kids who are "in their heads" alot need help and encouragement engaging in other pursuits.  Feeding their strengths and interests is great, but so is helping them engage in other activities - which there might not be as much time or emphasis on, if you are doing "afterschool."  

 

They need to find other interests and passions in life beyond being a brain, and other ways of being a "brain" beside just the linear, school model (even if this comes naturally to them and they like it!). smile.gif  


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#17 of 64 Old 06-20-2012, 12:06 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I think the danger is that she is in a structured environment all day long at school - so coming home to curricula is more time spent in a structured environment.  A curriculum IS structured, by definition, and that is part of what you like about it - you admit that it is "linear."  Well...her whole school day is linear.  You run the risk (IMO) of filling her entire day with academics that are handed to her in an organized, linear fashion.  Spooned out bit by bit.

 

I want to be clear that I think it's great your DD finds academics "fun" - that she has an insatiable desire to learn more! thumb.gif  I was such a child once - I was a total nerd and devoured everything I could get my hands on, often unchallenged by my gifted classes, coming home to read, read, and read some more.  Academics were absolutely all tied up in what I found to be enjoyable - from acid rain test kits to Egyptian hieroglyphic stamps to reading biographies of famous artists.  

 

That said, I think it may help to view your DD's afterschool studies as an "independent study" period.  She is in linear, academic, school mode all day.  She needs some time to dabble in this or that (yes, even science or math - they don't have to be taught in a linear fashion - in fact, many areas are interconnected).  She needs the freedom to spend her time on one concept if she wants to, or follow an idea freely across multiple subjects.  In short - to think in a way that is free-wheeling and inspired, not linear.  Do you have library access?  I would think finding relevant books that way (that are written to a specific subject, not just generalized and watered down to a specific grade level only) may be much more helpful than a pre-packaged curriculum.  

 

The other thing is...kids need lots of free time, creative time, make believe time.  It helps them roll new concepts and knowledge around in their brain, for one (one can't always just fill the tank - that is only one way of learning).  If you can't get the answer right away, have your DD use creative thinking to brainstorm some possibilities - and then think of ways to test them, if she can.

 

Academics are only one facet of a kid - involving primarily their brain, however passionate they may be!  Kids need help to be well-balanced little people.  If you had a kid who loved being active and was obsessed with sports, you would still read to them and work on their schoolwork - in the same way, kids who are "in their heads" alot need help and encouragement engaging in other pursuits.  Feeding their strengths and interests is great, but so is helping them engage in other activities - which there might not be as much time or emphasis on, if you are doing "afterschool."  

 

They need to find other interests and passions in life beyond being a brain, and other ways of being a "brain" beside just the linear, school model (even if this comes naturally to them and they like it!). smile.gif  

Again I never said I would be forcing her to do anything. The curriculum would be a reference for her independent study, but it should be linear. Does anyone know of a good curriculum? We go to the library weekly, she has tons of free time. Again, I am not sure what is going on here, people seem to me to be really against having curricula at all. Personally I think having access to a well organized set of information for k-12 as a reference for my child is a good idea. No one said she would be getting all at once or in bits. It's having a set of information that she can have access to. Goodness, relax. Also who said this was going to be a daily occurrence everyday after school? I think a lot people have preconceived ideas about how this looks, ask questions please don't assume anything.

 

Thanks



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#18 of 64 Old 06-20-2012, 12:15 PM
 
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Again, does anyone know of a good home school program book based not online ?

As a homeschooling parent of four kids who have done a lot of science over the years (my eldest ias graduated high school now) I have not ever found such a comprehensive book or program that I feel is worth the paper it's written on. The grade-levelled stuff tends to be so shallow and superficial as to be useless for kids with even a vague interest in things scientific. If it's at a high enough level to have a depth of content it's too dry and/or laden with written work for a younger child. My dd9 has been using a program like this through our school district's homeschooling umbrella program; to find any new or interesting information we've had to go four grade levels ahead. We mostly skip the units in her areas of particular interest because the material is stuff she's already more than familiar with. In areas she hasn't learned much about we end up ditching more than half the written work, because she just doesn't have the stamina expected of 7th graders... and it's pretty dull stuff for the most part. Most of what we do for science has to be outside the realm of the curriculum, or else she'd start finding science to be pretty boring. And I don't want that, because she currently loves science and has a wonderful scientific mind.

What we end up doing is gleaning resources that are not grade-levelled, based on my kids' particular interests. Not curriculum, for the most part. Typically books written by creative scientists interested in sharing their passions with young people. Or documentaires, or real-life applications of science. Because science covers everything from geology to theoretical physics to animal behavior to genetics, you don't find passion and creativity spanning all those areas in a comprehensive way. Although it's more work for the parent, I've found that the best way to raise a keen little scientist is to help your child with the exploration and discovery process on a topic-by-topic basis. After all, that's what science is in practice... encountering things that make you curious, asking questions about your observations, and seeking answers.

Maybe I'm misunderstanding what you're asking for, because I don't think what you're asking for could exist. In what way could science be made "linear"?

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#19 of 64 Old 06-20-2012, 12:20 PM
 
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I'm sorry if I offended you.  I was just coming back to post that what I said was by no means a prescription - I was just trying to explain the philosophy (from my perspective) behind the objection to a curriculum.  You asked why this was a bad thing - I was just trying to explain.

 

Again, I have to say that the reason it is being seen as suspect is that your daughter gets a full day of linear teaching and curriculum at school - to provide still more structured learning after school seems to be imbalanced. That is why many are saying that academics pursued outside of school shouldn't be linear and shouldn't be structured (i.e. not a curriculum).  By all means have great reference materials available for your DD's interests, but PPs are advocating that learning outside of school be very child-led and more creative/open-ended.  To that end, a curriculum seems a little too strict and limiting.  She gets plenty of "the answer to x is y" and "you have to learn a before you can learn b" in school.  Learning outside of school is great but I think a more exploratory, uncharted path would balance her structured school day, and teach her to think in different ways.  If she is interested in a subject, I would find a relevant book or resource for her - no need for a curriculum that is supposedly age-specific.  If your daughter is gifted, she is likely to be at a range of age levels in her various abilities anyway.


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#20 of 64 Old 06-20-2012, 12:34 PM
 
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What we end up doing is gleaning resources that are not grade-levelled, based on my kids' particular interests. Not curriculum, for the most part. Typically books written by creative scientists interested in sharing their passions with young people. Or documentaires, or real-life applications of science. Because science covers everything from geology to theoretical physics to animal behavior to genetics, you don't find passion and creativity spanning all those areas in a comprehensive way. Although it's more work for the parent, I've found that the best way to raise a keen little scientist is to help your child with the exploration and discovery process on a topic-by-topic basis. After all, that's what science is in practice... encountering things that make you curious, asking questions about your observations, and seeking answers.
Maybe I'm misunderstanding what you're asking for, because I don't think what you're asking for could exist. In what way could science be made "linear"?

 

yeahthat.gif  This is what I mean - curricula can be limiting in scope, dry in material, etc. - much better to find appropriate, specific and engaging resources written by knowledgeable people who care deeply about their topic.  Your kid is very passionate about learning, and these types of authors are passionate about their subject - it's a great match. thumb.gif

 

And I completely agree about science - I am still a little stumped on that one, apart from the artificial distinctions of "biology before earth science" or whatever that schools impose. shrug.gif  To me, that only decreases understanding because you lose out on all the connections and interactions between fields - in fact, I hesitate to even say that as if they were separate, because the various scientific "disciplines" are so deeply intertwined.


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#21 of 64 Old 06-20-2012, 01:09 PM - Thread Starter
 
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As a homeschooling parent of four kids who have done a lot of science over the years (my eldest ias graduated high school now) I have not ever found such a comprehensive book or program that I feel is worth the paper it's written on. The grade-levelled stuff tends to be so shallow and superficial as to be useless for kids with even a vague interest in things scientific. If it's at a high enough level to have a depth of content it's too dry and/or laden with written work for a younger child. My dd9 has been using a program like this through our school district's homeschooling umbrella program; to find any new or interesting information we've had to go four grade levels ahead. We mostly skip the units in her areas of particular interest because the material is stuff she's already more than familiar with. In areas she hasn't learned much about we end up ditching more than half the written work, because she just doesn't have the stamina expected of 7th graders... and it's pretty dull stuff for the most part. Most of what we do for science has to be outside the realm of the curriculum, or else she'd start finding science to be pretty boring. And I don't want that, because she currently loves science and has a wonderful scientific mind.
What we end up doing is gleaning resources that are not grade-levelled, based on my kids' particular interests. Not curriculum, for the most part. Typically books written by creative scientists interested in sharing their passions with young people. Or documentaires, or real-life applications of science. Because science covers everything from geology to theoretical physics to animal behavior to genetics, you don't find passion and creativity spanning all those areas in a comprehensive way. Although it's more work for the parent, I've found that the best way to raise a keen little scientist is to help your child with the exploration and discovery process on a topic-by-topic basis. After all, that's what science is in practice... encountering things that make you curious, asking questions about your observations, and seeking answers.
Maybe I'm misunderstanding what you're asking for, because I don't think what you're asking for could exist. In what way could science be made "linear"?
Miranda

When you learn anything you start small and expand upon. That's what I mean but linear, starting at 1 and moving up. She knows a lot of facts about animal biology & human biology. She is also interested in Astronomy & Geology. On top of that she loves plant life & dinosaurs. It goes on and on and on. Obviously she wants to learn all of this. Of course I am going to need multiple texts to give to her. I am sure there is a text out there that explains in great detail how to introduce a young child to the world of science. I am not a science teacher but maybe I need to consult an actual teacher of the subject or texts designed for the teacher because that's a lot different than what I am getting here. If she were in classroom at school with a science teacher allowing her to guide him in whatever direction she wanted to go or learn about , I am sure he would be full of information that he could expand upon, and probably would have a wealth information in some reference material. That's what I am looking for, thanks for helping me get to that realization.



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#22 of 64 Old 06-20-2012, 08:09 PM
 
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You might enjoy Nebel's "Building Foundations in Scientific Understanding."

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#23 of 64 Old 06-20-2012, 10:46 PM
 
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My son, now 8, is very fond of all things science... Here are some of our favorites (we homeschool but don't follow a set curriculum):

 

Usborne has some great basic science books. My son liked "What's Chemistry All About?" and "What's Physics All About?" when he was your daughter's age:

http://www.usborne.com/catalogue/catalogue.aspx?area=S&subcat=SWSA&id=3834

 

He also enjoyed the Brainwaves books:

http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/6252411-the-most-explosive-science-book-in-the-universe-by-the-brainwaves

 

Mine's a very hands-on kind of kid, so we have lots of books with ideas for experiments. Science Rocks! is one. DK does some good ones-- The Way Science Works is one. DK also has some fun science reference books- we have a shelf-full because my son went through a DK phase. There's lots... 365 Science Experiments is another. Some fun electronics projects ones published by Kids Can Press... We have picked up lots of these in library books sales and at used bookstores, because the projects experiments don't really go out of date :)

 

My son liked BrainPop (website) for short basic introductions to lots of science topics. Ones that grabbed his interest generally led to further exploration using other resources. Discovery Education has great videos. And Google is pretty awesome :)

 

Science is such a huge subject that any textbook that tries to be comprehensive is going to be pretty much scratching the surface. If you have a science-y kid who likes to focus and dive in deep, you may find better and more interesting material by looking for- for instance-- a great book on genetics, or a cool documentary on black holes, or a website on human anatomy.

 

Other cool things to have-- a good microscope, science kits (snap circuits, chemistry sets etc), a library card! And really- TIME! One of the best things about switching to home learning in grade 1, for us, was having so much more time to pursue interests. I found it harder when he was in school all day and then came home and had a million things he wanted to do before bedtime.

 

One thought about your comment re. linear learning, or as you put it, "start small and expand upon". That may be how your daughter likes to learn, in which case this may not be relevant to you, but I just thought I'd put this out there as food for thought.... Some kids don't like to learn that way, at least not all the time. My son often likes to get the big picture, the high level concepts etc- and then he will go back and fill in pieces as he sees a need. Trying to give him little bits and pieces in a more linear fashion-- as is done in the classroom- would drive him crazy. I tend to be more linear myself, so it has been an interesting process for me to see this preference emerge in his learning style and to figure out how to support this.


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#24 of 64 Old 06-21-2012, 04:40 AM
 
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@Pigpokey I don't think my daughter is interested in being home schooled because that means she will no longer be in class with her Friends, no more recess with friends, no more group projects with friends, no more field day, field trips, or class parties with friends. Yes she can make more friends, and even maintain the ones that she does have, but she will no longer be in school with them, I know my daughter and that would devastate her.

 

(1) But the purpose of education is to get our kids to adulthood with a well-developed mind and body, not one where the main purpose of the day is hanging out with friends.  I am reminded of a quote from the movie Heathers that goes something like this:  "My parents wanted to move me into high school out of the sixth grade, but we decided to chuck the idea because I'd have trouble making friends, blah, blah, blah. Now blah, blah, blah is all I ever do. I use my great IQ to decide what color lip gloss to wear and how to hit three keggers before curfew."

 

(2) All these things are offered in almost any medium to large city in the United States inside the home and virtual schooling communities.  My children are in either class or practice or Scouts or whatever about 18-20 hours a week, and we don't have time to go to the weekly field trips, Robotics team, classes offering regular group projects, etc.  They do go to plenty of parties.  

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#25 of 64 Old 06-21-2012, 12:50 PM
 
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(1) But the purpose of education is to get our kids to adulthood with a well-developed mind and body, not one where the main purpose of the day is hanging out with friends. 

 

I see social development as important as any of the rest of it. One of our biggest reliefs when we switched from homeschooling to school (the kids were 10 and 12) was simply seeing the same kids day after day, and having the same basic cohort for a variety of activities including sports, drama and even girl scouts. My kids were finally able to make friends in a way that NEVER worked for us when we were homeschoolers. Our reality of homeschooling was that parents often said that would be a certain events, but then not show because they were tired and overwhelmed. Even when they did show, things that meet weekly cannot foster the kind of friendships that develop when children get to see each other every day.

 

Another relief was having so many things happen in one building so I was no longer driving all over the city -- we suddenly spent a lot less time in the car. Social activities were now with people who lived close by. Everything became simpler and easier. My kids spent more doing DOING and less time just getting back and forth. 

 

Back to the OPers first question, I honestly find it easier to be a fully engaged parent during evenings, weekends, and summers with my children in school.  I was really burnt out when I was homeschooling -- which I know is something that is taboo to say out loud, yet I heard from other homeschooling moms over and over when I was enmeshed with that subculture. 

 

I would never presume to tell another parent how their child could best be educated. It's complicated and at times I've had trouble figuring it out with my own children.

 

But I can see that my children are THRIVING in school -- socially, emotionally, and academically.

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#26 of 64 Old 06-21-2012, 02:25 PM
 
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Absolutely school is something that can be a great choice and right for many families many  of their kids' learning years.  But I wanted to make a point that the OP should consider it after perhaps learning more about it and not discard it because her daughter says she wants to go to first grade.  In my point of view, the socialization can be a double edged sword and the good parts of the socialization can be teased out of the out of brick and mortar school community in most medium to large cities.  I also think the type of relationships home schoolers have among each other is a closer model of the kind of relationships that gifted adults typically have, where the public school model is a closer model of the kind of social relationships that exist in factory, mill, mining towns, etc.  My husband grew up in a coal mining town.  The dads got up, walked up the hill to work, came home at the same time.  

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#27 of 64 Old 06-21-2012, 02:46 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Originally Posted by moominmamma View Post

You might enjoy Nebel's "Building Foundations in Scientific Understanding."
Miranda

 

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Originally Posted by Cassidy68 View Post

My son, now 8, is very fond of all things science... Here are some of our favorites (we homeschool but don't follow a set curriculum):

 

Usborne has some great basic science books. My son liked "What's Chemistry All About?" and "What's Physics All About?" when he was your daughter's age:

http://www.usborne.com/catalogue/catalogue.aspx?area=S&subcat=SWSA&id=3834

 

He also enjoyed the Brainwaves books:

http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/6252411-the-most-explosive-science-book-in-the-universe-by-the-brainwaves

 

Mine's a very hands-on kind of kid, so we have lots of books with ideas for experiments. Science Rocks! is one. DK does some good ones-- The Way Science Works is one. DK also has some fun science reference books- we have a shelf-full because my son went through a DK phase. There's lots... 365 Science Experiments is another. Some fun electronics projects ones published by Kids Can Press... We have picked up lots of these in library books sales and at used bookstores, because the projects experiments don't really go out of date :)

 

My son liked BrainPop (website) for short basic introductions to lots of science topics. Ones that grabbed his interest generally led to further exploration using other resources. Discovery Education has great videos. And Google is pretty awesome :)

 

Science is such a huge subject that any textbook that tries to be comprehensive is going to be pretty much scratching the surface. If you have a science-y kid who likes to focus and dive in deep, you may find better and more interesting material by looking for- for instance-- a great book on genetics, or a cool documentary on black holes, or a website on human anatomy.

 

Other cool things to have-- a good microscope, science kits (snap circuits, chemistry sets etc), a library card! And really- TIME! One of the best things about switching to home learning in grade 1, for us, was having so much more time to pursue interests. I found it harder when he was in school all day and then came home and had a million things he wanted to do before bedtime.

 

One thought about your comment re. linear learning, or as you put it, "start small and expand upon". That may be how your daughter likes to learn, in which case this may not be relevant to you, but I just thought I'd put this out there as food for thought.... Some kids don't like to learn that way, at least not all the time. My son often likes to get the big picture, the high level concepts etc- and then he will go back and fill in pieces as he sees a need. Trying to give him little bits and pieces in a more linear fashion-- as is done in the classroom- would drive him crazy. I tend to be more linear myself, so it has been an interesting process for me to see this preference emerge in his learning style and to figure out how to support this.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by pigpokey View Post

 

(1) But the purpose of education is to get our kids to adulthood with a well-developed mind and body, not one where the main purpose of the day is hanging out with friends.  I am reminded of a quote from the movie Heathers that goes something like this:  "My parents wanted to move me into high school out of the sixth grade, but we decided to chuck the idea because I'd have trouble making friends, blah, blah, blah. Now blah, blah, blah is all I ever do. I use my great IQ to decide what color lip gloss to wear and how to hit three keggers before curfew."

 

(2) All these things are offered in almost any medium to large city in the United States inside the home and virtual schooling communities.  My children are in either class or practice or Scouts or whatever about 18-20 hours a week, and we don't have time to go to the weekly field trips, Robotics team, classes offering regular group projects, etc.  They do go to plenty of parties.  

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Linda on the move View Post

 

I see social development as important as any of the rest of it. One of our biggest reliefs when we switched from homeschooling to school (the kids were 10 and 12) was simply seeing the same kids day after day, and having the same basic cohort for a variety of activities including sports, drama and even girl scouts. My kids were finally able to make friends in a way that NEVER worked for us when we were homeschoolers. Our reality of homeschooling was that parents often said that would be a certain events, but then not show because they were tired and overwhelmed. Even when they did show, things that meet weekly cannot foster the kind of friendships that develop when children get to see each other every day.

 

Another relief was having so many things happen in one building so I was no longer driving all over the city -- we suddenly spent a lot less time in the car. Social activities were now with people who lived close by. Everything became simpler and easier. My kids spent more doing DOING and less time just getting back and forth. 

 

Back to the OPers first question, I honestly find it easier to be a fully engaged parent during evenings, weekends, and summers with my children in school.  I was really burnt out when I was homeschooling -- which I know is something that is taboo to say out loud, yet I heard from other homeschooling moms over and over when I was enmeshed with that subculture. 

 

I would never presume to tell another parent how their child could best be educated. It's complicated and at times I've had trouble figuring it out with my own children.

 

But I can see that my children are THRIVING in school -- socially, emotionally, and academically.

 

 

 

Mooninmamma thanks for the suggestion i will check it out :)

 

@Cassidy68 Thanks for all the suggestions. We do watch science based shows, we enjoy nova, and natgeo, as well as we recently watched the Frozen Planet special. I have the 365 science experiment book. I also appreciate you telling me about how your child likes to learn. It's cool that he goes back and fills in the gaps, my kid doesn't do that. But if she wants to do the whole picture first that's fine too, I think we naturally go back and forth but still I would like small- large just for the reference.  I am totally going to check out all your resources though, they sound great.

 

pigpokey I value human relationships. I don't have a huge family for my child to have access to, we have mom dad and that's it. Developing long term relationships with other human beings is very important to me, of course things like lip gloss and drinking are going to come up. It's part of living life. I don't want to home school her, it's not something I find appealing, and she is not interested in it. Learning in a group setting, learning how to deal with peer pressure & conflicts & having to maintain relationships with people that aren't family over a long period of time is part of life. Reputations are created, consequences occur, its a healthy system of checks and balances that I want my daughter to have experience with long before college. I understand that your kids are involved in various programs outside of traditional "school" that's great for them, my daughter is also involved in various things outside of school, but school is valuable to us. We see at as necessary socially, morally, character building, filled with challenges,. Somethings of course are not great about traditional school, but no system is perfect not home school or traditional school and I hope my daughter will learn that nothing in this world is perfect its about making choices that you can live with. Home schooling is just not the choice for me.

 

@ Linda on the move Thanks for your honesty about how you chose how to educate your children. Sometimes I think people see the world as black and white it's not it's grey. I can relate to the whole not being in the car all day thing. We walk everywhere, except ballet class. We are able to give so much to our community by being part of our neighborhood school, I tutor a few kids a couple times of week with reading, I volunteer in her class, and in other classes, I will be starting a girl scout troop this fall for first grade. She loves being part of her community as well, walking with all the kids to school, taking part in community cleanups, and participating at the school neighborhood garden. This choice of mine was also complicated.

 

Thanks Everyone

 

Michelle

 

btw for those of you who have sent me private messages, I am not able to respond because I have to have at least 10 Valid Posts whatever that means :) So once I get them I will reply, thanks for the kind words though, you know who you are :)



"We all want progress, but if you're on the wrong road, progress means doing an about-turn and walking back to the right road; in that case, the man who turns back soonest is the most progressive. " - C.S Lewis

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Originally Posted by pigpokey View Post
 I also think the type of relationships home schoolers have among each other is a closer model of the kind of relationships that gifted adults typically have, where the public school model is a closer model of the kind of social relationships that exist in factory, mill, mining towns, etc.  My husband grew up in a coal mining town.  The dads got up, walked up the hill to work, came home at the same time.  
 

 

 

banghead.gif   not my family's experience, either with homeschooling or with school.  And you've phrased this in an extremely insulting way.

 

If you want to stick with talking about the great friends your kids have via homeschooling, then you are on solid ground, but as soon as you start generalizing, you aren't.


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#29 of 64 Old 06-21-2012, 03:16 PM
 
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@ Linda on the move Thanks for your honesty about how you chose how to educate your children. Sometimes I think people see the world as black and white it's not it's grey. I can relate to the whole not being in the car all day thing. We walk everywhere, except ballet class. We are able to give so much to our community by being part of our neighborhood school, I tutor a few kids a couple times of week with reading, I volunteer in her class, and in other classes, I will be starting a girl scout troop this fall for first grade. She loves being part of her community as well, walking with all the kids to school, taking part in community cleanups, and participating at the school neighborhood garden. This choice of mine was also complicated.

 

 

 

We were posting at the same time.

 

It's been a long and sometimes difficult path. One of my children is just gifted, and the other is 2E (she is both gifted and on the autism spectrum.) There's is really nothing I wouldn't do for my kids, but figuring out what are the best things to do for them has been challenging.

 

My signature quote "but everything has pros and cons" refers to homeschooling vs school. There are pros and cons each way, and I do believe that how it shakes down is different for different kids.

 

Although we didn't initially switch to school because we were wanting to be more a part of the community, it was an unexpected and delightful outcome. For us, it turned out that the "homeschooling community" wasn't a community at all, but rather a counter cultural movement that inhibited relationships rather than fostered them. We are part of a community now.


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#30 of 64 Old 06-21-2012, 03:58 PM - Thread Starter
 
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banghead.gif   not my family's experience, either with homeschooling or with school.  And you've phrased this in an extremely insulting way.

 

If you want to stick with talking about the great friends your kids have via homeschooling, then you are on solid ground, but as soon as you start generalizing, you aren't.

I found it insulting also, generalizations are a big problem and create huge holes in arguments, logic 101.

 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Linda on the move View Post

 

 

We were posting at the same time.

 

It's been a long and sometimes difficult path. One of my children is just gifted, and the other is 2E (she is both gifted and on the autism spectrum.) There's is really nothing I wouldn't do for my kids, but figuring out what are the best things to do for them has been challenging.

 

My signature quote "but everything has pros and cons" refers to homeschooling vs school. There are pros and cons each way, and I do believe that how it shakes down is different for different kids.

 

Although we didn't initially switch to school because we were wanting to be more a part of the community, it was an unexpected and delightful outcome. For us, it turned out that the "homeschooling community" wasn't a community at all, but rather a counter cultural movement that inhibited relationships rather than fostered them. We are part of a community now.

I really appreciate your honesty about how you came about going from homeschool to school and how you feel overall about the experiences from both sides of the fence. Your so right, there are pros and cons from both sides, and it's different for every child.  I have some experince with homeschool families. Some are part of large communities of homeschooling children and some are just a mother and her child. I have different feelings depending on the specific family & circumstance. Personally though I am not interested in being part of either. Maybe more something like a co-op school or something like that, but not homeschool. As a young mama I really do appreciate your honesty, you have no idea :)

 

Michelle



"We all want progress, but if you're on the wrong road, progress means doing an about-turn and walking back to the right road; in that case, the man who turns back soonest is the most progressive. " - C.S Lewis

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