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Old 06-02-2013, 03:09 PM - Thread Starter
 
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We live in VA and the state testing system is called SOL (standards of learning). I think I've mentioned Evans love of anything science, anyway he is just finishing 2nd grade but I gave him the 3rd grade SOL and he scored pass/advance and he hasn't even been to 3rd grade yet. He's told me that he's not bored in school because after the teacher teaches something & he understands he's allowed to get a book to read while she keeps teaching to the rest of the class (he LOVES to read).

I want to do these SoL tests for reading and math, but its a slow process cause he doesn't want to sit still for a test on the weekend. But what do I do with this? Is this just how it is for gifted kids? I don't want to make big waves at his school, but I don't want him to end up bored either. Should I ask if he can sit in on a 4th or 5th grade science class? (We aren't finished the 5th grade science sol yet, but so far he's passing with a 445 & 500 is advanced.). Do I keep doing these tests for reading and math and see where ends up and ask for him to skip a grade?

What would you do?
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Old 06-02-2013, 06:02 PM - Thread Starter
 
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So we finished the 5th grade exam and he passed, not by much but still, he's only in 2nd grade.
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Old 06-02-2013, 06:29 PM
 
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If as your subject line suggests you're considering grade-skipping, the school will want testing according to their parameters. I wouldn't test him yourself. First of all, it may burn him out on testing. Second, practice tests are out there in order for kids to improve their scores, and having him do well after doing practice tests probably won't convince them as readily as having him do well "cold," so to speak. There are a lot of factors to consider with grade skipping. Achievement is one of them, but only one. I would encourage you to talk to the school to understand their process for evaluating possible grade-skips and investigate all the other factors that play into it before doing any more self-directed evaluation. 

 

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Old 06-02-2013, 08:30 PM
 
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Generally "grade skipping" means skipping over a whole year uniformally, so he'd move into 4th next year. Educators call this "whole grade acceleration."

It sounds like you considering skipping a year or two of science, but staying in grade for the rest. This is "single subject acceleration."

My family has seen combinations if each. Both have their advantages and disadvantages. Single subject acceleration is a scheduling nightmare for schools. Also, many schools integrate writing and science, so it might be a bit messy if his skills aren't evenly advanced.

In either case, step one is to talk to the teacher for feedback on his depth of knowledge (does she see it?), rate of learning, and maturity. At the same time, figure out what the district policy is for acceletation. Any acceleration will require data, and as moominmama mentioned, it need to be "clean" with an independent person administering testing.

Your son was recently IDd as gifted. The data that went into that will be useful and is a solid first step.
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Old 06-02-2013, 09:14 PM
 
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State standards tests focus on the bare minimum skill level required by the state. They are not representative of all that is learned in any particular grade. That's not to say your son didn't do well! I just wouldn't equate the results with mastery of any particular grade level and I don't recommend using them to determine readiness or ability to skip a grade.

 

If he's happy, I'd not jump to grade acceleration. Typically, the curriculum in 3rd grade opens up and it's easier to accommodate high level students. Instead, start with differentiation and/or subject acceleration first. If that's not enough, then reconsider acceleration.

 

My eldest did a mid-year skip from K to 1st. The school came to us after they'd exhausted their other options. She was an excellent candidate and terribly unhappy prior to the skip. My youngest tests just as high but has been happy in his natural grade and really, not the best candidate for acceleration in many ways. We have been able to meet his needs in other ways with the schools help.


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Old 06-03-2013, 08:46 AM
 
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State standards tests focus on the bare minimum skill level required by the state. They are not representative of all that is learned in any particular grade. That's not to say your son didn't do well! I just wouldn't equate the results with mastery of any particular grade level and I don't recommend using them to determine readiness or ability to skip a grade.

 

If he's happy, I'd not jump to grade acceleration. Typically, the curriculum in 3rd grade opens up and it's easier to accommodate high level students. Instead, start with differentiation and/or subject acceleration first. If that's not enough, then reconsider acceleration.

On the first point, yes, that the state tests generally are not a sufficient measure of needing a skip, but most schools fear the dreaded gap.  These tests will show if the child has gaps in content knowledge to be skipped.

 

When it comes to accelerating a content kid, I'm not convinced this kid is being effectively accommodated.  He's being set to read when he's mastered a lesson instead of given differentiated material.  Yes, differentiation is generally the first approach in dealing with a child out of sync with the rest of the class, but not all teachers can do this effectively.  The sad fact of the matter is that a lot of elementary ed teachers lack authentic background in the sciences.  This also means that accelerating a year or two in science will likely not help.  In my state, science education doesn't actually advance beyond the factoid realm until middle school, and even then it's rather thin.

 

My daughter was given a science acceleration in 5th this year.  It was done simply to give her fewer years to wait before getting to more meaningful science, not because the 6th grade science was any more appropriate to her level.  This was really only made possible because she was already trekking over to the middle school daily for other classes, and that 5th grade finally switches to a schedule of doing science daily.  In K-4, our school does 3 week science blocks alternating with 3 week social studies blocks, making switching classes for a science acceleration a scheduling nightmare.

 

OP, you need to open a discussion with the teacher first and principal second.  There's a lot to an acceleration decision (only a little bit reflected here!).  You might be well served with a 3rd grade teacher adept at differentiation (=more science in greater depth instead of tuning out the drivel to read a novel), or a bigger change might be necessary, but the first step is always the classroom teacher.

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Old 06-03-2013, 10:26 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Thank you all for your input, it's great to hear from moms who have btdt! The only reason I gave him the sol tests was because I needed to know how far along he was before I started to consider the option of skipping and I didn't know how else to judge that.

I set up a meeting with the gifted coordinator for this week to discuss the process and differentiation that is given within the classroom. Then I think I'll chill and wait to see how his 3rd grade teacher does. I was just thinking scheduling would be easier if we had a plan before next yr started, but sounds like it wouldn't matter much so I'll wait and see.

He has a great group of friends in his grade so I really don't want a whole grade skip, but I'd like him to be a bit more challenged and excited, especially about science since that is high on his interest list right now.
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Old 06-03-2013, 11:26 AM
 
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When it comes to accelerating a content kid, I'm not convinced this kid is being effectively accommodated.  He's being set to read when he's mastered a lesson instead of given differentiated material.  Yes, differentiation is generally the first approach in dealing with a child out of sync with the rest of the class, but not all teachers can do this effectively.  The sad fact of the matter is that a lot of elementary ed teachers lack authentic background in the sciences.  This also means that accelerating a year or two in science will likely not help.  In my state, science education doesn't actually advance beyond the factoid realm until middle school, and even then it's rather thin.

 

I agree that being sent to read after instruction is not effective accommodation but it's also not enough trial to jump to grade acceleration. There are other options and if the teacher (who I suspect is no longer his teacher because he just finished 2nd grade) didn't bring up these options, the parent should.

 

1st and 2nd grades are a wasteland for many bright kids. 3rd grade is often a change in classroom/curriculum/teaching style and it's worth trying out before advocating for a grade skip.

 

My daughter was given a science acceleration in 5th this year.  It was done simply to give her fewer years to wait before getting to more meaningful science, not because the 6th grade science was any more appropriate to her level.  This was really only made possible because she was already trekking over to the middle school daily for other classes, and that 5th grade finally switches to a schedule of doing science daily.  In K-4, our school does 3 week science blocks alternating with 3 week social studies blocks, making switching classes for a science acceleration a scheduling nightmare.

 

I agree that science acceleration is tough. My eldest was given science acceleration on top of a grade skip in middle school and it only worked because out district offered 2 different advanced 8th grade science options. My youngest was given online and individual project based options through elementary and that worked pretty well.

 


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Old 06-03-2013, 11:37 AM
 
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WNM, We don't disagree on this,but I wanted to make sure the OP heard a little more about accelerations, bumps and all.  I'm still not clear if the OP is thinking about a whole grade acceleration or single subject acceleration.

 

So your child, obviously talented in science, do two years of 8th grade science?!?  Hopefully the content was wildly different.  We're fortunate because DD will already be bussed to the HS for math in 8th grade, so going for science as well will work out perfectly. 

 

Cyndy, please let us know how the meeting with the gifted coordinator goes.  Before the meeting, do what you can to educate yourself on interventions that teachers could and should be using for gifted kids (differentiation and compaction) and other options when those are insufficient (acceleration of whole grade or single subject).  Getting the educator lingo down pat will make the conversation go much more smoothly and will allow you to function as a member of your son's educational team.   However, it might be time to grip reality and realize that little in the way of engaging science education happens in many elementary classrooms. There are occasional inspiring teachers, but we've found that few understand the fundamentals of scientific exploration.  We've scratched that itch for my children through TV programs like NOVA, going to telescope nights and planetarium shows, heading to museums, doing the nature walks at Metro Parks, and simply choosing to answer a child's question with more questions or encouraging experimentation and exploration.  We're hoping to keep the love alive until they have access to more in depth instruction at school.
 

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Old 06-03-2013, 12:20 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Geo, I don't think I do know the teacher language! What should I know? Please educate me!

I am a special Ed teacher, but that is the opposite side of the spectrum and I feel very lost with all this gifted talk! I get "regular" teacher talk, but feel lost with gifted talk!
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Old 06-03-2013, 12:23 PM
 
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My third grade daughter was offered the opportunity to do an independent study in science via the district's gifted and talented coordinator using a blog. She was interviewed about her interests, selected a topic from a list with some pre approved resources, and developed a project. She worked on these things via computer while the rest of the class was working through the regular material (which she was able to master after the first presentation). Prior to this, she was given logic problems to do when she finished early, which a) had nothing to do with science and b) were still too easy for her. Because of scheduling, her school was not open to single subject acceleration.
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Old 06-03-2013, 12:55 PM
 
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My understanding:

 

Grade-skipping usually refers to jumping a grade or more ahead for all subjects. It can create social adjustment issues. Schools tend to get worried about that, and the "gaps" that can arise when the child doesn't attend 3rd grade at all.

 

Subject acceleration usually means moving up to join a higher grade for one or more specific subjects. The same concerns about gaps and social fit occur, though to a lesser extent. Sometimes the scheduling is the big stumbling block. Fourth grade math may not be scheduled at the same time as 3rd grade math, for example.

 

Compaction or telescoping usually means flexible pacing or faster pacing to move through all material at a faster rate. For instance a group of five kids in a 3rd grade classroom might be grouped together to do both the 3rd and the 4th grade math curriculum during their 3rd-grade year. Sometimes compaction is done through independent study: a child might be given resources and a personalized study environment enabling him to move ahead of the class. Potentially he could move into a new grade level, or onto self-directed project work upon completion of the current grade curriculum. This approach requires the child to be pretty independent and motivated, and the teacher needs to be willing to think outside the box.

 

Differentiation and enrichment refer to various strategies designed to encourage highly capable students to work through the standard material but in greater depth. For instance, advanced students might be encouraged to write an alternative ending to novel rather than a standard book report, or to do challenge word problems that are multi-step rather than the single-step problems that are in the class workbooks. This demands a fair bit of time and creativity from the teacher. 

 

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Old 06-03-2013, 03:59 PM
 
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So your child, obviously talented in science, do two years of 8th grade science?!?  Hopefully the content was wildly different.  We're fortunate because DD will already be bussed to the HS for math in 8th grade, so going for science as well will work out perfectly. 

 

 

 

Yes, our middle school offers 3 science options in 8th grade. Regular science covers the standard 8th grade curriculum in for our state. The two advanced options one being horticulture and the other, pre-engineering. They compress the 8th grade curriculum into about 1/3 of the school year to allow for the other focuses. It did mean a little repetition for DD in 8th grade but she had an excellent teacher that year who was able to give her alternatives during the "regular curriculum" weeks. Not perfect but DD actually doesn't care much about science.


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Old 06-27-2013, 06:23 PM
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My understanding:

 

Grade-skipping usually refers to jumping a grade or more ahead for all subjects. It can create social adjustment issues. 

 

 

 That's a myth.  In fact, it's easier to make friends with kids who are your mental age rather than merely your chronological age.  


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Old 06-27-2013, 08:35 PM
 
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 That's a myth.  In fact, it's easier to make friends with kids who are your mental age rather than merely your chronological age.  

 

Uh, well, I believe the difficulties are often grossly exaggerated, but as someone who experienced grade skipping and resulting social adjustment issues, I don't think it's a myth. I didn't say that grade skips on average worsen the social fit, just that there can be adjustment issues. Whether they're more problematic on balance than the different difficulties that might have existed if the grade-skip didn't happen is anyone's guess. There are always adjustments when a child changes peer groups, whether moving from school to school or to a different grade than her classmates. I was two years younger than my classmates and during middle school I was hugely out of sync with their physical maturation, and during high school I struggled with very different levels of freedom and responsibility (driving, curfews, movies, dating) compared to my classmates.

 

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Old 06-28-2013, 11:17 AM
 
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 That's a myth.  In fact, it's easier to make friends with kids who are your mental age rather than merely your chronological age.  

 

I have to agree with Miranda on this. It can be an exaggerated issue but not exactly a myth. I like to think my 16-year-old was a pretty ideal case in terms of grade acceleration. She's done well in remaining a leader and being well-liked socially but it's not been without some adjustment and hiccups. My youngest didn't skip but naturally young for grade in a heavy red-shirting district. He's 1 to almost 2 years younger than a large percentage of the boys and many girls. There have certainly been social and physical frustrations for him.

 

This is not to say we regret where our children are and they've not had nearly the discomfort many assumed they'd have. However, when EVERYONE else is placed by age and you are NOT that age, things do pop-up and it's a good thing to be aware of when helping your child maneuver through life.


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Old 06-28-2013, 08:40 PM
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For anyone interested, here is an in-depth report about acceleration:

 

 

 

http://www.accelerationinstitute.org/Nation_Deceived/ND_v1.pdf

 

 

And highly gifted kids (the ones who usually skip) are often going to be out of sync socially, anyway.  But that gap can actually narrow when the child is skipped, especially if the skip is just a grade or two.  

 

Going back to the original question, I suggest skipping if your gifted child is really unhappy (bored) in the current grade.  I wouldn't skip a happy child.


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Old 06-29-2013, 04:35 AM
 
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Chiming in to agree with WNM and Miranda that the adjustment issues that can pop up aren't a myth (borne out by my own experience and experience with DS1), what's a myth is that they are an impediment to a happily functioning child and a reason not to skip!

 

Also agree with A&A that cognitive adjustment and social adjustment issues combined as experienced in the same age group may be worse than some social adjustment issues in the older group.

 

The one thing that parents and teachers need to know is that how well the kids (both the skipped child and the classmates who need to get used to the idea of a kid who is a year younger being allowed to do some of the same stuff they do just because he or she can and wants to, without having clocked in the requisite number of years and months, which is a novel idea for kids in the 21st century) handle the skip is largely up to how well the adults handle it themselves. No it's not a big deal. It's just a better fit. Happy to have you with us. Hope y'all show him the ropes just like with any new kid in class. Nope does not mean the kid has a pushy mom we now need to ostracize.

 

Some more Gifted 101:

 

Telescoping means a kid moving through all of the requisite content, but at a faster pace. In theory, that's what a Montessori classroom would do for any kid that's above average, with the problem that at some point a kid may ceiling, ie run out of material at their level and need to be skipped within a Montessori school, too. Within a traditional teacher-centered model, realistically works only in self-contained gifted classes (eg completing 4th and 5th grade math in one academic year).

 

Compacting means preassessing content of a unit and on the kid achieving a certain percentage, letting that kid skip the unit altogether and move on to the next unit. May in theory work in a very well differentiated classroom in which kids work on different units anyway at their own pace. Does not work so well in practice if there is, as usual, only one or two kids so advanced that they can skip whole units, which means they would need more teacher attention that the teacher can realistically provide, and of course, at some point run out of material for that classroom. Teachers in a traditional Montessori program would be uncomfortable with skipping works anyway.


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Old 06-29-2013, 10:18 AM
 
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I have to agree with Miranda on this. It can be an exaggerated issue but not exactly a myth. I like to think my 16-year-old was a pretty ideal case in terms of grade acceleration. She's done well in remaining a leader and being well-liked socially but it's not been without some adjustment and hiccups. My youngest didn't skip but naturally young for grade in a heavy red-shirting district. He's 1 to almost 2 years younger than a large percentage of the boys and many girls. There have certainly been social and physical frustrations for him.

 

This is not to say we regret where our children are and they've not had nearly the discomfort many assumed they'd have. However, when EVERYONE else is placed by age and you are NOT that age, things do pop-up and it's a good thing to be aware of when helping your child maneuver through life.

 

 

Have to agree with that.  I actually have a child on each "side."  My daughter has a January birthday and is one year ahead (she is going into 10th grade).  Since she started school (2nd grade full time gifted program) being the youngest has always been a good fit for her.  Her only two frustrations so far have been Facebook and now, driving.  She couldn't get Facebook until she was 13 and now her friends are taking driver's training or have already done so and she has another 6+ months to wait.  It's also forced us to give her a bit more freedom than her same aged peers--- there is a wide gulf between middle school and high school and she is surrounded by 15+ year olds instead of in the middle school with 11-14 year olds, so she acts more like the first group (of course, that could be personality anyway).

 

My son, meanwhile, was born on the cut-off day.  For three years he was in his age "correct" grade (in a full time gifted program as well).  We actually ended up retaining him for social reasons.  His 2nd grade (at that point, and then again) teacher really advocated for him and got the administration to understand the issue: academically he was 4th grade across the board (higher in math) but socially he was a fairly immature 1st grader (he was seeking out the younger kids to play with, and he is still friends with those same younger kids: as a 5th ("should" be 6th grader) he actually has many 4th grade friends, too).   His fit has definitely not been ask good as his sister's, but it is definitely better than it was when he was with the older grade.


 

 

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Old 06-29-2013, 10:53 AM
 
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For anyone interested, here is an in-depth report about acceleration:

 

 

 

http://www.accelerationinstitute.org/Nation_Deceived/ND_v1.pdf

 

 

And highly gifted kids (the ones who usually skip) are often going to be out of sync socially, anyway.  But that gap can actually narrow when the child is skipped, especially if the skip is just a grade or two.  

 

Going back to the original question, I suggest skipping if your gifted child is really unhappy (bored) in the current grade.  I wouldn't skip a happy child.

 

Oh, we read that report years ago when it was first released but real life experience is never as clean. We don't do ourselves or our friends any favors by pretending grade acceleration is perfect. It's not. It can be better but it's never enough academically. Students with athletic aspirations are at a real disadvantage. We know several grade skippers in life and none, including ours, have found a social oasis in the new grade. There will be exposure and situations your child may not be ready for. As a parent, you may be looking and giving your child some liberties earlier than you'd like to help them. Absolutely a skip can make life much better but that's not the same as ideal. Parents should know that going in so they can help their child wade through it.


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Old 06-29-2013, 10:42 PM
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Oh, we read that report years ago when it was first released but real life experience is never as clean. We don't do ourselves or our friends any favors by pretending grade acceleration is perfect. It's not. It can be better but it's never enough academically. Students with athletic aspirations are at a real disadvantage. We know several grade skippers in life and none, including ours, have found a social oasis in the new grade. There will be exposure and situations your child may not be ready for. As a parent, you may be looking and giving your child some liberties earlier than you'd like to help them. Absolutely a skip can make life much better but that's not the same as ideal. Parents should know that going in so they can help their child wade through it.

 

  For parents considering a skip (and again, to the OP, I wouldn't skip a happy child), I hate to see them dissuaded by scaremongering about social issues.  I never called grade acceleration perfect, by the way.  But it's much better than letting your child languish in a grade far too easy for her/him.


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Old 06-30-2013, 06:33 AM
 
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I don't see any scaremongering amongst this discussion, but instead a realistic discussion of ones own experiences.

There are two volumes to the Nation Deceived:
http://www.accelerationinstitute.org/Nation_Deceived/ND_v2.pdf

I prefer this one because the academic in me prefers citations.

I dislike the ND documents because they use a lot of loaded terms and language. One of the papers discusses the "myth" of social adjustment issues. There are also a lot of generalizations about gifted kids, e.g. "gifted kids tend to more socially adept than their age-peers" with discussion of deeper friendships. Since neither are true for my kids, this then leads me to not believe subsequent statements about how skipping improves social adjustment.

At the end of v2 is the author's own validation study of the IAS (starts on page 167 of the document, page 176 of the pdf). In this paper, they find the "school information" and "Interpersonal skills" most highly correlated with the total IAS score. For post-skip kids, they find that 74% "adapted well" socially. That means 26% either don't adapt well or needed significant support post -skip. Denying this population's existance is just as problematic as using the worry over social adjustment as a barrier to all skips.

Our state requires use of the IAS in the skip decision making process. It does not make statements over what score is necessary. I felt the power of going through the IAS with the school administration was to discuss each issue in turn and to develop a plan to make the skip successful. Even with that, we were not without big bumps in friendship skills, handwriting and writing,while DS still requiring further accelerations in math and reading. As the anticipation of the stress and adjustment period of the skip was significant (increase in sleep needs and attention problems that weren't there before), he was denied these accelerations for another year. Hopefully next year goes better.
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Old 06-30-2013, 10:48 AM
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  It's not for everyone, but for certain children, skipping can be a lifesaver.


"Our task is not to see the future, but to enable it."
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Old 06-30-2013, 11:32 AM
 
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Fear-mongering? We're just sharing our experiences allowing new families to go in with some ideas for trouble spots. Frankly, I would have loved that but we had no such support then. We don't have to pretend there is nothing to look out for to support acceleration. I think you are being a bit over-sensitive and forgetting who you are discussing this with. 

 

My eldest did a mid-year skip from K-1st where she was promptly subject accelerated further in math and science. She's a 12th grader officially but she's been taking all but 2 classes at the community college since the beginning of junior year. She's putting together her university applications and it's likely she'll be living across the country for most of her 17th year..... could be graduated by 19 or 20 depending on the program she chooses. She's been an ideal case. She continued to be put in leadership positions by her peers. She's always been well liked. Yes, we got doom and gloom from people who had no experience but DD doesn't regret the move and neither do we. She, like us, recognizes the issues though. She noticed that she was only a track star every other year growing up because every other year, she'd catch up to her competition physically for long enough to win some meets. Thankfully, sports weren't that important to her but to some kids they are so it's important for parents to start looking for alternatives early to support that interest out of school. She certainly remembers shopping for bras even though she'd not started developing because she felt too exposed next to the other girls in the locker room even though she'd been changing in multi-aged dressing rooms from age 8 (it's different in school.) She's always connected best with males but certainly, the age gap complicated things starting in middle school when she'd be a young 12 working closely with older 14's. Being mature but also the youngest in most situations, we've had to help her cope with advances from much older boys... usually not knowing she was so young. As a parent, I had to be ready to give her certain freedoms earlier like hanging out at the mall without an adult because that was where her older friends were developmentally. These aren't things to be SCARED of. They are things to be aware of and ready to guide and support.

 

It's not enough to be "unhappy" to consider acceleration. It's not enough to do well on some state tests. There are a lot of factors and parents should look into them all. A family should exhaust their other options first and they should be prepared with options when they hit the occasional rough patch.


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Old 06-30-2013, 11:52 AM
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Well we can just agree to disagree.  If the child is unhappy due to boredom (not due to other factors), and if that boredom is representative of the educational system as a whole in that community, and not just the style of one particular teacher, then I think that is enough of a reason to skip a grade.  No sense wasting the child's time in a grade he/she doesn't need to be in.  The primary function of going to school is to get a good education.  Everything else, like athletics, is merely secondary.

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Old 07-04-2013, 01:03 PM
 
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I would speak with next year's teacher or the principal about accommodations and differentiation.  In our school, what you are looking for would be called levels or within-grade differentiation.  At our school we don't have levels for science or social studies, but we do for math and reading, beginning in 3rd grade.  Ask about that because he might be able to move up to another level, if they allow it.  For example, a group of our 3rd graders did an advanced math program this year.  

 

I agree with Miranda that your school will want to do their own testing in their own way - for our standardized tests there is a specific format and timeline and they wouldn't accept a parent-run test.  They will also be able to gauge where he fits in the percentiles - being one level ahead might be common.  Different type of test, but my 3rd grader passed the high school standards in math and reading this spring.  (My read on that is the bar is maybe too low for high school, but that is another topic.)  

 

I know several kids in DD's grade who are clearly gifted in science - I am a PhD scientist and I could see this while helping out in the 1st grade classroom.  These kids did special projects, took part in the local science fair, those could be options for your son as well.  

 

But at some point they may not have the ability to meet his needs.  My DD loves spelling and she has been doing her own program in spelling and vocabulary this year with me at home - even the highest level H-M words they gave us were not enough for her.  So we supplement at home, and you may have to do that with DS.  

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Old 07-04-2013, 06:03 PM
 
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OT ...

Quote:
Originally Posted by squimp View Post

my 3rd grader passed the high school standards in math and reading this spring.  (My read on that is the bar is maybe too low for high school, but that is another topic.)  

 

Holy toledo! My 4th grader aced an 8th-grade math exam and I thought that was impressive. I agree it does make you wonder about the high school standards. What was on the test? Has he actually studied high school material?

 

Miranda


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Old 07-05-2013, 02:49 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by moominmamma View Post

OT ...

 

Holy toledo! My 4th grader aced an 8th-grade math exam and I thought that was impressive. I agree it does make you wonder about the high school standards. What was on the test? Has he actually studied high school material?

 

Miranda

 

Yes, basic high school standards can be really low. Our kids have to pass a high school exit exam to graduate high school. It's equivalent to the very basic 6th and 7th grade education. It barely even touches algebra I. Obviously, most kids in high school work at much higher levels but for the state purposes, they just want to make sure the lowest level graduate can read, write and perform the most basic of functions.


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Old 07-06-2013, 12:47 AM
 
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Our kids have to pass a high school exit exam to graduate high school. It's equivalent to the very basic 6th and 7th grade education. 

 

How odd. Thanks for explaining.

 

Miranda


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Old 07-06-2013, 04:01 PM
 
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OT ...

 

Holy toledo! My 4th grader aced an 8th-grade math exam and I thought that was impressive. I agree it does make you wonder about the high school standards. What was on the test? Has he actually studied high school material?

 

Miranda

Yes it's the "pass" or "meet" standard for high school - and she was in the 38th percentile for the 11 graders taking the test - so that's the bar.  It's a strange test that keeps giving them harder questions depending on their answers.  My DD has basic arithmetic, some simple algebra, stats and geometry.  She's also good at word problems, which helps.  

 

Your DD would likely exceed the standard and be in a much higher percentile if she aced the 8th grade test.  If she was in the 95th percentile for the 8th grade test, that would be 96th percentile in the 11th grade.  

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