at what age was your child tested ? - Mothering Forums

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#1 of 21 Old 06-08-2013, 05:33 PM - Thread Starter
 
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In my school district kids are not tested til the second semester of second grade. My son is almost four and due to some emotional issues we are seeing i feel that is too late. I have read that younger than kindergarten is sometimes too emotionally unstable to get an accurate reading. I was curious about what age yor child was tested.
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#2 of 21 Old 06-08-2013, 06:29 PM
 
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Test when you need the information.

Your child is still three. If you need information on his emotional issues, seek appropriate testing to get you the help you need now. Kindergarten is still more than a year off. That's a long time from now.
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#3 of 21 Old 06-08-2013, 06:34 PM
 
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Two eldest were tested at 14: both in order to obtain funding on their school's behalf for accommodations that were already being give but not funded. Youngest two (currently 14 and 10) haven't yet been tested. We have certainly had our share of quirkiness and emotional issues, but nothing that proof of presumed giftedness would have made a difference for, IMO. 

 

YMMV, of course. We are lucky to live in a resourceful thinking-outside-the-box area, and the local public school has had very much the same attributes.

 

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#4 of 21 Old 06-08-2013, 06:44 PM
 
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DD 16 was tested by the school district at 12 as a favor to us. She started getting accommodation a few days into Kindergarten based on achievement (including grade skip and subject acceleration.) However, we had to move into a different district for high school and they only accepted a particular test. DD 12 was tested in 2nd grade. He was 7. He was offered accommodations within the first few weeks of K but we opted against them until 1st grade. His testing was just routinely done in 2nd grade at his school.


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#5 of 21 Old 06-09-2013, 07:48 AM
 
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We had our son tested privately at 6 1/2 because we thought he might qualify for a gifted magnet school in our area. I think testing should happen when the information becomes critical to a child functioning well. I (personally) don't see the value of testing prior to school because a public district may not accept a private IQ test for gifted programs.

 

If you suspect that your child is gifted and it's impairing their function at preschool or home, you could have a private IQ test. I have also heard that results before the age of five (?) might be unstable.

 

My son had some emotional issues at four that we see now was either caused by or heavily influenced by giftedness. I don't know what you're facing, but for us my son's emotional intensity at age four (tantrums, difficulty transitioning, and noncompliance) was very difficult. If it helps, the reasons behind some of these behaviors became more clear as he got older (situational anxiety, perfectionism, hyper focus, and a willful/intense nature). Gifted children can be very, very intense and may even be misdiagnosed or dually diagnosed with emotional and neurological issues as a result of it. 

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#6 of 21 Old 06-10-2013, 06:03 AM
 
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Ds and Dd were assessed when they were age 8 (3rd grade) as part of the process for identification and placement in the school district's gifted program. They had both been informally identified long before that point.  Soon after Ds started preschool - he wasn't quite 3 y.o. - his teacher suggested it was likely.  Thankfully, he was in a good Montessori program and accommodations in a multi-age, self-directed, engaging classroom were easy to achieve.  DD had a similar story. 

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#7 of 21 Old 06-10-2013, 09:55 AM
 
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At 6 yo for placement in gifted program.

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#8 of 21 Old 06-10-2013, 11:59 AM
 
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DD was 12 when we had her tested, both to get official documentation for possible placement in a gifted program, but also to provide info and reassurance about making a change of academic setting.  In other words, we were looking for verification that it was okay, and actually necessary to move her to a more rigorous setting to challenge her and provide her access to classes specific to her interest (STEM).

 

We have not tested DS yet, and are unsure when we will.  As the testing results can be variable, I want to wait until it becomes necessary (that is yet undefined!).  He will be attending a ES next year for Kindergarten that offers self-contained gifted classes preK-6th grade. The ES does K assessments; I'll see what the teachers have to say, but I know that I've been told that sooner than later is better  (and the testing for self contained gifted K is free for in district, and $50 for OOD).  I know I should have tested and moved my daughter earlier than we did, so I need to get some clarity on this for DS's sake!

 

OP, don't know if this has been useful for you!  Good luck, and let us know what you decide.


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#9 of 21 Old 06-10-2013, 12:54 PM
 
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We just had ds tested, 2nd semester of 2nd grade when the school first does it. They like to wait till then to make sure the results aren't just due to good parenting.
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#10 of 21 Old 06-10-2013, 01:46 PM
 
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Originally Posted by CamMom View Post

My son had some emotional issues at four that we see now was either caused by or heavily influenced by giftedness. I don't know what you're facing, but for us my son's emotional intensity at age four (tantrums, difficulty transitioning, and noncompliance) was very difficult. If it helps, the reasons behind some of these behaviors became more clear as he got older (situational anxiety, perfectionism, hyper focus, and a willful/intense nature). Gifted children can be very, very intense and may even be misdiagnosed or dually diagnosed with emotional and neurological issues as a result of it. 

I could have written this post - only adding sensory issues and some stimming behaviour. At the time, we were directed towards a full autism evaluation (which we now know was way off the mark) even though his advanced development was clear to all and cognitive functioning was part of his developmental testing. in restrospect, we could have just done IQ testing, and might have tried to find a gifted consultant experienced with his particular combination of giftedness, intensity and sensory issues which I think is not even that rare among little gifties. Then again, we might not have found one anyway, and it was good to be able to rule out full blown ASD.

 

At this point, to help him with his emotional issues, you probably don't need a number anyway - if you assume he is gifted and intense, lots of helpful information is out there (on this board, too). Do you need it for others, eg preschool teachers? what do you think they might do different?

 

Inaccuracy of testing isn't so much about emotional instability, more about children's development happening in leaps and spurts and plateaus, and you never quite now which phase your kid is going through in relation to the testing norms. Also, wildly differing ability to follow directions and comply with strangers' requests and of course, wildly differing family backgrounds and experiences with particular testing formats, both of which skew results - again in relation to the testing norms.

 

A somewhat different case, but in retrospect it made it easier for me to understand why some say it is impossible to get accurate results when testing very young children, for whatever issue:

We had DS1 tested for colourblindness at age 2 - his maternal grandfather is colourblind, which made for a 50/50 chance of his being colourblind as well, and even though he appeared to know all his colours at age two, he kept making peculiar mistakes - orange for green, green for brown, black for red, blue for pink, all of which I was familiar with from my father, and appeared to be upset about just not understanding why he was getting things wrong so much. I just wanted to know before preschool so I could make sure no one would drill him on colours he couldnt see or make an issue of his not understanding colour coding, like I told you 15 times the red cup is Tom's! or some such. I couldn't fathim what the problem could be with testing him - just show him the test plates and ask him whether he could see the flower or ball or whatever.

 

The ophthalmology school's staff insisted on doing a full checkup, with lots of waiting time in between testing, and by the time they actually sent us to someone showing him the colour vision test plates, he had spent close to two hours being tested, was tired and crabby and just clammed up. First they thought he couldn't name the objects in the pictures at all (red dots on green dots, bunnies, flowers, balls etc), but when I told them he could say all the words he was supposed to, but might just be too tired to do so, they patiently waited for him to point to the corresponding picture in black and white dots - which he invariably did, identifying every single one correctly after taking his sweet time about it.

So, a tired crabby two year old with limited language skills but perfect colour vision, taking forever to comply with the tester? that's what they thought, certifying that his colour vision was perfectly normal.

No (as we found out since): a two year old with extremely impaired colour vision, but with extremely advanced visual perception, unusual focus and ability to comply with a tester's request, working extremely hard to find out which picture he was supposed to identify by using the faintest differences in brightness between dots and simply needing time and all his concentration to do so.

 

We may need test results for entry into a gifted program by early 4th grade, so need to get organized about that one at age 8 at the latest. I would not bother doing a proper IQ test much sooner than that - 5 at the earliest, but rather 6 or 7.


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#11 of 21 Old 06-10-2013, 02:33 PM
 
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Both my kids were tested at 6 for placement into the district gifted program.


 

 

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#12 of 21 Old 06-12-2013, 11:51 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mmooneyhan View Post

In my school district kids are not tested til the second semester of second grade. My son is almost four and due to some emotional issues we are seeing i feel that is too late. I have read that younger than kindergarten is sometimes too emotionally unstable to get an accurate reading. I was curious about what age yor child was tested.


My child was tested for giftedness at 9 yo, but I have assumed he is gifted for a long time. He also has many special needs, thus he is "twice exceptional".

 

I would be very skeptical of IQ testing of an age 3 child. Ds' IQ test results at 6 were not useful at all, because his special needs masked his high intelligence in certain areas. The psychologist who did the testing did not even recommend testing for giftedness. Even now, they do not use the full IQ test results to assess him because of issues with processing speed and working memory.

 

For a three year old, it makes sense to me to learn about the characteristics of gifted children and if your child fits the profile you can consider learning about gifted children's behaviours and how you can support them. Also keep in mind that many gifted children have impairments that some even believe are connected to their giftedness - those can result in emotional issues. Testing helps parents to understand, but IMO its main value is for accessing services. If testing won't result in any short-term benefit to the child, I probably wouldn't spend the time/energy/money.


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#13 of 21 Old 06-16-2013, 05:37 AM
 
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My son tested during the very last semester of first grade, at age 7, in order to be accepted into the gifted program. This was done so that he could begin the program in second grade and there are a limited number of students accepted in second grade. My son was one of the lucky few to begin in second grade due to a lot of hyperactivity caused by boredom with regular classes alone.

Our school district believes that third grade is the earliest in which students can balance their regular curriculum along with the gifted curriculum, which are two totally different programs run in separate classrooms with separate teachers. Attending this particular program requires time away from the required curriculum, the student is expected to learn what is required, concurrent with what the gifted class also requires.

I'm extremely grateful for this program, he has adapted well. He's no longer acting out in class due to boredom nor is he complaining about how much school sucks. He's learning how to balance his time, doing "really cool experiments, Mom!", feeling very confident and proud. I'm proud also, to say the least!

Ultimately, I believe that it depends on the child's ability to adapt emotionally and academically. I was a tad concerned that he wouldn't do well due to his immaturity but I went with my gut. Cliche or not, mom's gut feeling is almost always correct, we know our children better than anyone else.
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#14 of 21 Old 06-20-2013, 09:35 PM
 
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My DS was tested  at age 5, during his second semester in Kindergarten for the talented and gifted program at his school/district.

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#15 of 21 Old 06-27-2013, 03:56 PM
 
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ARE you asking about IQ testing?  Because there are lots of kinds of testing, and your school district may not do IQ testing anyhow, even for the gifted program.  Ours doesn't--IQ is not a consideration for gifted program entrance.  We did have her IQ tested at about 5 because were thinking of applying to a private school for gifted students. The IQ scores were also relevant when DD had a full developmental evaluation to rule out Asperger's, and to diagnose her with ADHD.


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#16 of 21 Old 06-29-2013, 09:09 AM
 
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ARE you asking about IQ testing?  Because there are lots of kinds of testing, and your school district may not do IQ testing anyhow, even for the gifted program.  Ours doesn't--IQ is not a consideration for gifted program entrance.  We did have her IQ tested at about 5 because were thinking of applying to a private school for gifted students. The IQ scores were also relevant when DD had a full developmental evaluation to rule out Asperger's, and to diagnose her with ADHD.

 

Good point.

 

Thinking about it, both my kids did the gifted testing at 6 for getting into the district program (ITBS, CogAT, Renzulli).  When my son was 8 he had additional IQ testing as part of them looking to see if he had any learning disabilities.


 

 

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#17 of 21 Old 08-01-2013, 12:05 PM
 
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For those of you mentioning school testing - I am curious whether your school actually administers an individual IQ test. Both the school my children attend and the public school system test for advanced/gifted programs and/or in-class enrichment based on results of achievement testing. At my children's school, they do use a subsection of the "Terra Nova" achievement test to test for the enrichment program. I noticed that my child's score on this section changed by around 9 points (he has taken it twice). I guess this section of the test is supposed to give an idea of IQ, but I wonder about the accuracy of that assumption....As far as I know, it is a fill-in-the bubble type test.  

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#18 of 21 Old 08-01-2013, 12:23 PM
 
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For those of you mentioning school testing - I am curious whether your school actually administers an individual IQ test.  

 

In our case, yes, the WISC-5 I think. They brought in a contracted psychologist (since the school district is too small to have someone on staff) to do a long half-day of individual testing. There's no gifted program here, so no routine testing for admission to it. Due to some quirky aspects of funding, the school tested my eldest two to prove that their grade-skips (which had already been put in place by the school) were warranted and not just being done to take advantage of additional funding. Also, ds has some mild learning disability issues,.and the IQ test provided some additional information as part of his LD evaluation.


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#19 of 21 Old 08-01-2013, 07:16 PM
 
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Our school does 3 steps of 'testing'. I can't remember the name of the first test. It is very STEM and I wasn't pleased that it was chosen as the first test. My ds scored in the 99th on it but I feel it rules out students that may be gifted in other areas. You must 'pass' the first test with 90% or above. Second is an informational survey by the teacher recommending and the parents. Third is the WISC. The results of all three steps are taken into account when deciding if the child joins the program.

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#20 of 21 Old 08-01-2013, 08:24 PM
 
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If it is early admission or grade skipping before 2nd grade it is an actual IQ test, but starting in 2nd it is just achievement testing.
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#21 of 21 Old 08-09-2013, 04:46 AM
 
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There are no gifted programs here, no gifted schools, no advanced courses and no grade skipping. Gifted is not mentioned or allowed in the country. The only option a parent has, besides leaving the country, is to get a very academically oriented private school and hope for the best. I think this works for bright and gifted kids. But it is not enough for PG kids who suffer, because the child clearly become the "problem." I thank my lucky stars that I do not have kids that are PG, because then I would not know what I would do. So testing, if it ever became available, would be irrelevant for us. However, if my kids were PG I would probably find a country that could test them, just so I could help them deal with whatever obstacles would be in their way, be that asynchronous development or proper education or something else. 

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