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#1 of 27 Old 07-26-2014, 04:52 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Care and Feeding of Voracious Readers

Hi all,
My 5yo is an unstoppable reader. Between her and her brother, we take about 100 kids books out of the library at a time, usually once or twice a week. This week we went three times. I cart those many, many pounds of books to and from the library in a very tired Rolser held together by duct tape.
She's been reading about 2 dozen picture books a day, plus about 5-10 early (step-into-reading/Seuss/Mr. Putter/Mouse & Mole, etc) readers a day. She reads early chapter books (Judy Moody / Jo Shmo / Galaxy Zack, etc) in a couple of days.
We're going camping for a week, so I told her we'd need to get books that would keep her going a bit longer, so we came home with longer chapter books today.

I have a few questions for those of you with early, voracious readers:

Do you censor their library selections at all? (ie. DD is very anxious about plagues & pathogens, but loves to read about them too as part of her studies as a self-professsed virologist )

Do you encourage them to read books that might be more of a challenge?
I don't do this, because I think kids should read whatever they want, when they want, but -- see above -- I think I might have to rethink this approach.

Somewhat related; do you struggle to find age-appropriate, engaging books that are 'safe' for very young readers? Any one know of any reading lists for very young but very proficient readers? DD is reading at about a grade 4 or 5 level, judging by when she takes up where I leave off in books like Chronicles of Narnia or ones Diana Wynne Jones and the like.

Do you have a separate book allowance?
We don't have any allowance, but again, I'm thinking about this.

Do you let them buy books?
We don't, as a rule, being that we very low income. My mom had the same approach for me too. I would've bankrupted her. Funny thing is, I'm a writer by trade, and depend on people buying books. But it's just not in our budget.

What do you do when you travel?
My mom would get me a visitor card for any place we'd be for longer than a week. We've done this a few times already. But we were in Mexico for a month last year and there was no source of English books. It was awful! We're going to the same town again this winter, and I think I'll ask if we can make an arrangement with a nearby International School.

Which brings me to the question of eReaders ... do your kids have one?
If so, do they use it in place of paper books? We limit screen time, so I'm not sure if using an eReader would count as screen time for our easily screen-zonked child. Does it for yours? Any tips on eReaders?

Thanks in advance!

dust.gifFour-eyed tattooed fairy godmother queer, mama to my lucky star (5) and little bird (2.5). Resident storyteller at www.thestoryforest.com. Enchanting audiostories for curious kids. Come play in the forest!
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#2 of 27 Old 07-26-2014, 05:40 PM
 
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Do you censor their library selections at all? Nope. My kids have self-censored as appropriate, not that they were particularly sensitive. They have always been happy to take honest parental advice along the lines of "See where it says 'coming of age story'? That often means a book has a lot of teenagery stuff in it. You might enjoy it more in a few years." Or whatever.

Do you encourage them to read books that might be more of a challenge?
No, I don't think I have. Though I think I've maybe said things like "Remember, you're going to have to carry your own backpack, so you might want to take just one or two books that will take you longer to read."

Somewhat related; do you struggle to find age-appropriate, engaging books that are 'safe' for very young readers? I found I actually enjoyed poking around for books that might interest my kids. I never ran out. For a while I kept a list of especially gentle stories for the very youngest or most sensitive readers here. Not sure if that's helpful; perhaps you already know most of these.

Do you have a separate book allowance?
Sometimes when we made one of our semi-annual pilgrimages to a real-life bookstore I'd encourage each child to choose one book (the rest being collaboratively chosen by kids and parents). My dd11 just spent all her babysitting money on ebooks, for what that's worth. We try to use the library, but since the only one we have is our local public school's, that doesn't work very well in the summer.

Do you let them buy books?
Yes. See above. No public library.

What do you do when you travel?
Our trips are usually very short since dh doesn't really get holidays much, and my kids have preferred novels from a young age, so we usually just get everyone to fill their backpacks with what they want to.

Which brings me to the question of eReaders ... do your kids have one?
Our family of five has two Kobo Minis sharing the same kobo account/library. With my eldest dd home for the summer (making six of us) I'm wishing we had at least one more. "Where's the other Kobo?" is like a refrain around here lately. It's fun because often several of us are reading the same book at the same time. I feel like the Kobos are completely different from "screen time." They are honestly just like books to us, except far more portable and compact. The e-ink is just like printed text to my eyes and they aren't multi-tasking devices with other multi-media capabilities. They just display text, like print. I wouldn't use them for illustrated books, but for novels they're the boss.

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#3 of 27 Old 07-26-2014, 09:44 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Thanks, Miranda! That's exactly the sort of BTDT advice I was looking for.
On the subject of your Kobos ... would you buy that kind again?

Off to check out your list ...

dust.gifFour-eyed tattooed fairy godmother queer, mama to my lucky star (5) and little bird (2.5). Resident storyteller at www.thestoryforest.com. Enchanting audiostories for curious kids. Come play in the forest!
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#4 of 27 Old 07-26-2014, 09:46 PM - Thread Starter
 
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That is an AWESOME list, Miranda! That's for the link. I know most of them, but had forgotten many. What a lovely little clearinghouse. I've bookmarked it.

Off to place some holds at the library online ...

dust.gifFour-eyed tattooed fairy godmother queer, mama to my lucky star (5) and little bird (2.5). Resident storyteller at www.thestoryforest.com. Enchanting audiostories for curious kids. Come play in the forest!
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#5 of 27 Old 07-30-2014, 03:42 PM
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Do you censor their library selections at all?
No. I don't really believe in censoring what they check out. That doesn't mean I would be ok with everything. . . I am sure there is something that would get a "no" out of me. However, we go to the library as a family and hang in the children's section. I am really open minded. When my kids got older and were wanting to read young adult materials, I brought them to that section. I really find that the kids self-censor. If there is something that they aren't ready for, they usually just don't find the book interesting. They aren't trying to please a group of kids so there isn't any drive to read something because "everyone" is reading it. My oldest has read stuff that would raise an eyebrow or two. She asked me if she could read it, I said yes, and we talked about it later.

Do you encourage them to read books that might be more of a challenge?
Regarding my oldest, no. She has always read all sorts of books. That being said, I did figure out that if there was a book I would like her to read, it helped if she caught me reading it. For a few years, it was all about being mature. If I was reading something, especially if other kids weren't reading it, she wanted to read it too. My other children have been encouraged to broaden their horizons with reading. My second is dyslexic so reading has been a challenge for her. Getting her to venture out of her comfort zone is difficult.

Somewhat related; do you struggle to find age-appropriate, engaging books that are 'safe' for very young readers?
No. I know that people have this problem, but I didn't. Movies were harder for us. The villians in Disney bothered my middle child a bunch.

Do you have a separate book allowance?
No. They get gift cards for bookstores, and sometimes I will buy books for them. We mostly use the library. Our library has a "reading for fine forgiveness" program that covers the first $7 on a minor's card. After that, I pay 50% of their fines.

Do you let them buy books?
Yes.

What do you do when you travel?
We don't do a lot of traveling. We do bring books, but haven't found the need to bring many. When we travel, we stay very busy. The exception is camping. We all bring a couple books camping.

Which brings me to the question of eReaders ... do your kids have one?
My kids don't, but I do. I first got a Kindle fire. However, that wasn't fun to read on and was mostly used for games. I will use it to read, but it isn't a first choice. Then, I got a kindle paperwhite. This is much easier on the eyes. Our library has a great kindle lending library. I love this feature. It downloads right to the kindle and leaves when it is due. It gives us a three day notice before the book leaves. If we check it out again later, it saves our place. Too cool! I only use it for novels.

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#6 of 27 Old 07-30-2014, 11:25 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Thanks for playing along, AAK! And thanks for the tips on the Kindle. Much appreciated.

dust.gifFour-eyed tattooed fairy godmother queer, mama to my lucky star (5) and little bird (2.5). Resident storyteller at www.thestoryforest.com. Enchanting audiostories for curious kids. Come play in the forest!
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#7 of 27 Old 07-31-2014, 09:52 AM
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Do you censor their library selections at all?
No, not at all.

Do you encourage them to read books that might be more of a challenge?
Yes, but the choice is always theirs.

Somewhat related; do you struggle to find age-appropriate, engaging books that are 'safe' for very young readers?
Yes, that's a challenge. My readers are 17 and 12 now, so I don't really have advice on this one.

Do you have a separate book allowance?
We give them an allowance, but not a separate book allowance. The allowance can be spent/saved however they want to do so. It's a great money-management tool. They have to think about what they really want to buy!

Do you let them buy books?
Absolutely. I can't tell you how much money I've spent on books over the years. (And they usually get Barnes and Noble and Amazon gift cards from relatives for their birthdays.) We especially love hitting the library book-sale once a year!

What do you do when you travel?
We usually travel by car, so taking books is not a problem.

Which brings me to the question of eReaders ... do your kids have one?
Both of my kids have a Nook, but they both seem to prefer reading print books. (They only got a Nook in the last couple of years; I don't know if I'd buy a younger child an e-reader.) You can get a blue-light filter for the Nook now (the e-reader I'm most familiar with). The filter really makes the screen easier on the eyes.

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#8 of 27 Old 07-31-2014, 10:52 AM
 
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Do you censor their library selections at all?
Very lightly. One series DS wants to read has sex in it, and I've been directing him to other tamer books by the same author. But for the most part, I'm fine just letting them free in the children's section of the library.

I have found that, as far as upsetting content goes, he does self-censor very well. Better than I'd prefer, in fact - it drives me nuts when he won't read books I'm sure he'd love because there's something sad in it. But he seems to be starting to grow out of that.

If a child seemed driven to read about topics they find upsetting, I would suspect that learning more about it was their way of coping.

Do you encourage them to read books that might be more of a challenge?
Yes. While DS is a voracious reader, he tends to not give new books much of a chance. If a new book doesn't grab him within the first minute or so, he'll drop it in favor of one of a handful of books he's read a zillion times already. I don't stop him from reading those books, but we homeschool, and I do require he spend a certain amount of time each day reading something off our "school" shelf, which has books that are a bit more of a stretch.

Somewhat related; do you struggle to find age-appropriate, engaging books that are 'safe' for very young readers?
Not really my problem, as my kids have been late readers (Yes, late readers can turn voracious!). However, older books tend to be be more challenging but still appropriate for young kids (though you do have to watch out more for racism). Newbery award winners are another good resource.

Here's some other lists:
http://home.comcast.net/~askpauline/...kidsbooks.html
http://tinderbox.homeschooljournal.n...igned-reading/
http://www.mensaforkids.org/content/...eaderaward.cfm

Do you have a separate book allowance?
No, though I've thought about it.

Do you let them buy books?
Sure.

We do most of our book shopping at thrift stores and yard sales, where kid's books are often in the $0.10 - $0.50 range.

What do you do when you travel?
Depends on where we're going, how long it is, mode of transportation, and so forth. For a camping trip, I'd probably bring a bunch of thrift store paperbacks (cheap, and no huge loss if they get ruined).

Which brings me to the question of eReaders ... do your kids have one?
If so, do they use it in place of paper books? We limit screen time, so I'm not sure if using an eReader would count as screen time for our easily screen-zonked child. Does it for yours? Any tips on eReaders?


The kids have Kindle Fires. As others have said, they primarily get used for gaming and videos, and they prefer to read paper books. I've tried to get DS reading on his, which would be great because we can download ebooks from our library, but he just doesn't seem interested in that. I think it's a combo of the LCD screen not being ideal for reading and getting distracted by the other capabilities.

I think perhaps we'll end up getting plain old Kindles for them to read on. Maybe I'll lend him my paperwhite (which I love!) and see if he does better with that for reading. The eInk kindles also have the benefit of a MUCH longer battery life - if you turned off the wireless, you could probably take one on a weeklong camping trip without needing to recharge.

I don't count actual reading on an ereader against screentime - I treat it the same as if they were reading a paper book.

DS born 6/03, DD1 born 9/06, DD2 born 10/10, DD3 born 4/14.
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#9 of 27 Old 07-31-2014, 02:18 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Thanks, ocelot and A&A .. it's very helpful to hear how other mamas manage this.

We are camping for 8 nights right now (although we had to come back to the city for a doc appointment, hence the internet check-in) and I brought a huge stack for DD to read, but she's already eaten them up, thanks to our new comfy hammock hung beachside.
I'll have to bring back another huge stack for the last few days there.

Interesting to note, my friend who does a separate book allowance does it so that her kids don't have to make the choice between the newly released DVD they've been coveting and a book. The book allowance is a way to give the humble book a leg-up, so to speak.
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#10 of 27 Old 08-01-2014, 04:46 AM
 
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Hmm...camping...sounds like you absolutely need either a Kobo glow or a Kindle paperwhite with library access.
I am thinking of giving my oldest a kindle PW for his 8th birthday in Oct., but I have to find out how he could use library offers with that. And, while it might be nice to have him be able to read a bit while his little sister who he shares a room with can fall asleep, I am a bit worried I shall need to confiscate it every night to have HIM fall asleep at some point, too!

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#11 of 27 Old 08-01-2014, 08:51 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tigerle View Post
Hmm...camping...sounds like you absolutely need either a Kobo glow or a Kindle paperwhite with library access.
I am thinking of giving my oldest a kindle PW for his 8th birthday in Oct., but I have to find out how he could use library offers with that. And, while it might be nice to have him be able to read a bit while his little sister who he shares a room with can fall asleep, I am a bit worried I shall need to confiscate it every night to have HIM fall asleep at some point, too!
It depends on what system your library uses for ebooks. If it's Overdrive (which is most common), it works seamlessly. You check the book out, and then send it to the Kindle (or any other device that will run the Kindle reader) via Amazon, just as if you'd bought it. There are ways to transfer to other ereaders, like the Nook, as well.

Other systems may not work with the eInk Kindles. Our library has the 3M system as well, and you have to be able to download and install a certain application to use it, so it doesn't work with my paperwhite. I think it also requires active internet access for reading, not just for downloading.

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#12 of 27 Old 08-01-2014, 01:02 PM
 
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Originally Posted by ocelotmom View Post
It depends on what system your library uses for ebooks. If it's Overdrive (which is most common), it works seamlessly.
s&d is in my province, and I'm pretty sure all libraries here use Overdrive. I tried to use Overdrive about 8 years ago and it was a hassle: separate app, two-stage syncing, and so on. I'm glad to hear it's improved in the era of ubiquitous e-readers. Especially since as of September 2nd I will be eligible for a free public library card at a place I actually go every week.

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#13 of 27 Old 08-04-2014, 05:42 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Exciting, Miranda! Let me know how Overdrive works now.

dust.gifFour-eyed tattooed fairy godmother queer, mama to my lucky star (5) and little bird (2.5). Resident storyteller at www.thestoryforest.com. Enchanting audiostories for curious kids. Come play in the forest!
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#14 of 27 Old 08-11-2014, 10:24 PM
 
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How about stuffing a few books that stretch her reading level into her stack? I like to make trips to the library without the kids from time to time so I can pickup some things they would pass by (mostly because they have old covers). Librarians can be great resources, and also online librarians. Do some google searches. I've found myself reading the lists of "favorites" of librarians in completely different states.

I read some "adult" books starting when I was 7; I don't think it scarred me. I'd run out of the kid books I had brought, then start pulling things off the shelf of whoever's house we were at.
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#15 of 27 Old 08-12-2014, 10:10 PM
 
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So I've researched this and our local libraries use e pub with DRM, so it'll have to be kobo glo or aura, pocketbook lux or tolino vision or shine. That's a bit annoying because I have some kids books on the kindle already, but I guess this will have to be our dedicated library access tool. Very jealous to read about how overdrive works....
Maybe it's not so bad that's you can't easily buy stuff. I LOVE having internet access with my paper white because we don to have wifi in the house and I am on the road so much, but it is a temptation to buy much more than one should.
Anyone have any experiences with one of these for kids? Sounds like the tolino is a European system, but maybe with the pocketbook or the kobos? The kobo aura appears to be a bit smaller and lighter than the glo so maybe better for little hands?

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#16 of 27 Old 08-17-2014, 04:00 PM - Thread Starter
 
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We just got back from another week-long camping trip and this time I very carefully calculated the books-per-day possibilities, and packed several books of various kinds; about ten picture books with as many words as possible (think one page text, one page illustrated), about ten 'Easy Reader' chapter books (about two paragraphs per page), and about ten chapter books (of the Roald Dahl-ish sort/level). I thought I had it in the bag.

Um, nope.

She read the first twenty in the first day, even though it was a camp full of music programming!

Thankfully, the chapter books lasted until we got home. Phew!

Still considering the eReader idea, but the feedback I hear from various people about using them with their kids is that it seems like the kids prefer the real thing most often, and the parents are reluctant to offer a screen in place of the real thing.

I'd love to hear more from folks using the library for eBooks ...

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#17 of 27 Old 08-17-2014, 04:48 PM
 
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So she only reads books once? I suppose that's the unexpected advantage of not having access to a library: we probably only ever had about 20 picture books, and so none of my kids ever got the idea that you only read a book once. To this day, my kids are all dedicated re-readers. And I think it helps them learn to dig deeper, to notice new things every time they re-read. I wonder if this is something you could gently encourage?

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#18 of 27 Old 08-17-2014, 05:44 PM
 
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My 8 and 10 year olds have Kindle Paperwhites and love them. We are lucky to have acces to our local library and it's network as well as our neighboring city library and it's different network. The 8 year old is an obsessive reader and reads everything (still enjoys a good picture book, loves Mo Willems, Melanie Watt, and twisted fairy tales as well as middle grade and some YA books). The one big advantage of the ereader is being able to make the font size bigger. Many books look intimidating/unfriendly in book form, especially the older classic but on an ereader, they appear much more manageable.

Also, my kids are also big rereaders and have read a ton of books multiple times. My 10 year old was just rereading Bridge to Terabithia today even though she read it earlier this year.

Good luck!
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#19 of 27 Old 08-21-2014, 10:26 PM - Thread Starter
 
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On the subject of not re-reading ... it's my fault.
I don't re-read.
And with a great library system, thankfully I don't have to, and neither do my kids.
But I can see how it would be helpful, and the few times that I've re-read things have been in between access to libraries, so perhaps travel is a good time to do some re-reading.

But i don't like to re-read. And I have access to millions of books here in Vancouver libraries, and so I don't re-read.
Except drafts of my novels-in-progress (I'm a writer), which get a good 7-10 re-reads, not including the copy-edit draft or galley proof.
Not that I've ever made a point of not re-reading books, but it's just not something that I do.
There are simply too many books in the world, in my opinion.

And I never re-read pictures books ad nauseum, although I do go along with re-reading the favourites once and a while.
The reason why we started taking 50 - 100 books out a week is so that I didn't have to re-read picture books within a week. And then it just became normal, and so here we are.

The very rare times that I re-read are years and years and years later. For example, I just re-read all of Alice Munro's work, and Maya Angelou, and Raymond Carver and Jane Austen and Michael Ondaatje, but that's DECADES later.

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#20 of 27 Old 08-22-2014, 10:23 AM
 
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Maybe she's ready to write her own stories? Bring lots of paper if she can write, a tablet if she can type, or a voice recorder if that works better.

Or, my son actually prefers for me to tell him stories - new stories I have to make up on the spot. I'm not very good at this, so sometimes we go back and forth. I make up a part and then he adds some and so on.

And poetry lends itself well to re-reading. Poems are like songs and aren't meant to be heard just once

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#21 of 27 Old 08-24-2014, 02:22 AM
 
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Yes this. DH started this tradition, because his dad used to do it for him and his siblings, and now we both do it for goodnight stories whenever were up to it.don't need books or ereaders, not even light, you can have them snuggled up in the dark doing it and the little ones usually fall asleep. We have fun crossovers going on with their favourite characters from books who visit one another, visit us or other real life people. The one drawback is you really have to get your imagination going and pay attention to your own storyline at a time when you want to fall asleep yourself, just reading aloud can be done rather mindlessly. ( shame on me, but I have even perfected the art of reading on my kindle while singing the little ones to sleep).

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#22 of 27 Old 08-24-2014, 03:23 PM
 
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I'm no help on the reading thing, but I'll chime in and say my kids LOVE our storytelling traditions on camping nights. Usually after everyone's snuggled into sleeping bags dad tells a made-up story (he has a long-running thing going with a character called "Ziggy the Raven"), then each kid gets a chance to tell their own short story.
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#23 of 27 Old 08-24-2014, 07:01 PM - Thread Starter
 
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We LOVE storytelling! (Shameless plug for my audio story website featuring AP families in my signature below.)
I use a lot of the characters and plot lines that my kids come up with, actually.
DD has started to write her own books, which I could capitalize on, and encourage her to do when she "has nothing to read."
Good ideas, folks! Keep 'em coming!
Thank you ...

dust.gifFour-eyed tattooed fairy godmother queer, mama to my lucky star (5) and little bird (2.5). Resident storyteller at www.thestoryforest.com. Enchanting audiostories for curious kids. Come play in the forest!
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#24 of 27 Old 09-02-2014, 03:04 PM
 
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Hmm, Tigerle, come to think of it maybe I wrote too cavalierly. I still remember some haunting scenes I read.

I experience re-reading as a really different experience than the first time. I re-read a lot as a kid. It can be like getting to know a trusted friend a little better.
Sometimes the flow of the words becomes almost a song or chant, and there is a security and quiet joy in the familiarity.

Also, if your daughter is spending all her time reading, is she neglecting doing other things? Bikes, swimming, chess, catching lizards - there is so much out there in the world to do. I read a lot as a kid, but probably more than was good for my social development.
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#25 of 27 Old 09-04-2014, 08:12 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Letitia View Post
Also, if your daughter is spending all her time reading, is she neglecting doing other things? Bikes, swimming, chess, catching lizards - there is so much out there in the world to do. I read a lot as a kid, but probably more than was good for my social development.
I wonder about that myself, considering the amount that I read as a kid, and because it was a means for me to escape from a very messy home life.
I don't worry about it for my child, though. Not at all.
She has a lot of time available for reading because we homeschool, and while she is a voracious reader, she is also a natural scientist, an eager camper and outdoor-explorer, a world traveller, a pretty darn good cook, a delightful friend and confidante to her brother, an artist, a star-gazer, and a big part of our local community. She can't ride a bike without training wheels, and she doesn't want to put her head under water, but she loves riding her scooter, and loves swimming across lakes with her floaty-wings on.

We just got back from the Not-Back-To-School camp-out with a dozen or so families, and I think I can finally say that I've hit the sweet spot with regards to what level of material will keep her entertained and challenged. We only went through two graphic novels and Pippi Longstocking. Phew! That's better than hauling along three dozen books. I'm getting the hang of it!

dust.gifFour-eyed tattooed fairy godmother queer, mama to my lucky star (5) and little bird (2.5). Resident storyteller at www.thestoryforest.com. Enchanting audiostories for curious kids. Come play in the forest!
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#26 of 27 Old 09-12-2014, 11:21 PM
 
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Do you censor their library selections at all?
Yes. There are topics that are simply age inappropriate, and there are plenty of other books in the world to read instead. In addition, I steer DD away from books that I know will be "too scary" for her. She doesn't even like kid-oriented scary books (Goosebumps) and neither she nor I want to give her nightmares.

Do you encourage them to read books that might be more of a challenge?
Somestimes. This is usually unnecessary, because she'll pretty much read everything she gets her hands on. If I feel like she might need more challenge, I can just leave a challenging book laying around the house.

Somewhat related; do you struggle to find age-appropriate, engaging books that are 'safe' for very young readers?
Yes. It's tough. Talk to your local librarian, though, they usually have good ideas. There are also some threads on the Davidson forum with book suggestions.

Do you have a separate book allowance?
Yes and now. As far as a kid "allowance", no, because I am happy to encourage them without making them choose between a book and everything else in the world. We do have an "entertainment" budget for the whole family as a group.

Do you let them buy books?
Yes. For low budgets, I highly recommend checking out your local thrift stores. Some have better book selections that others, but kids books are almost always under a buck a piece, so you don't have to break the bank. You can often pick up some good magazines cheap at thrift stores, too, like National Geographic or Popular Science.

What do you do when you travel?
Well, when we traveled this summer we brought 1 carry-on size suitcase for me, 1 for the 2 kids, and 1 for the books. NOT KIDDING.

Which brings me to the question of eReaders ... do your kids have one?
Yes. We have 2 Nooks. I love them. We have 1 basic e-ink Nook. It was cheap, it's very sturdy, and a great reading experience for chapter books, which we can get at the library. And it's really really easy to increase the font size, which is important because my DD has terrible eyesight. Possibly from all the reading. I also like the dictionary function, so she can look up the definition of words if she can't figure them out from context.

We also have 1 tablet-type Nook which is a better choice for books with pictures. I love it. It has a built-in profile system so I can assign particular books and apps to users individually. I only WISH I could get a kid-oriented user management system as nice on our actual computer.


On the subject of re-reading, I don't much re-read my books, but my kids both love to re-read books they enjoyed. DD in particular will re-read books that are challenging several times. This is a great strategy for improving her vocabulary and reading comprehension skills. DS, who is 4, enjoys re-reading for the story, but he's also more inclined to try reading words himself in books when we re-read them.

Erin, mom to DD (1/06) and DS (10/09)
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#27 of 27 Old 09-18-2014, 06:37 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Thanks for responding with your answers, Aufilia.

SO glad that I'm not the only one packing a whole suitcase for books.

I like the idea of a dictionary function. When DD reads in bed and wants to know what a particular words means, she shouts downstairs. We've talked about walkie-talkies, just to stop the shouting. I want to encourage her queries, but not via shouting! Especially during the summer when our windows were open and she was hollering loud enough for the neighbours to hear. "MAMA!!! WHAT DOES PERAMBULATOR MEAN?"

And so on.

Taking notes on all the feedback about the e-readers.

In prep for our trip to Mexico this winter, I got in touch with the International School in the town we go to, and the Principal said he'd happily let us use the library, in exchange for me doing a writing workshop with the older kids and a storytelling workshop with the younger ones. So now we have a source! Whoot!

We just got back from Ottawa, and while we were there we took out about 50 books from the library there (thank you, sister-in-law). That was fun! Didn't have to pack that many.

dust.gifFour-eyed tattooed fairy godmother queer, mama to my lucky star (5) and little bird (2.5). Resident storyteller at www.thestoryforest.com. Enchanting audiostories for curious kids. Come play in the forest!
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