Support for Parents of Gifted Children, #2 - Page 11 - Mothering Forums

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#301 of 426 Old 11-11-2004, 02:29 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Britishmum
I have noticed that some wonderful British children's books get dumbed down for the American market. I order a lot off amazon.co.uk now for that reason - I dont want to buy a book and find it isn't the same.
OK, I've gone back and forth since reading your post last night about just how much I wanted to know. Deep breath. Could you give some examples? I try to get UK editions when possible, but have quite a few US editions, and some series are mixed.

I haven't had time to make a comparison of prices and shipping rates with Amazon.uk, but Powell's has made some sort of arrangement with a British bookseller to list their books on the Powell's site. They are the one's labeled "internet only."
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#302 of 426 Old 11-11-2004, 03:48 PM
 
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Wow...interesting about British books being "dumbed down" for the american market...what about the Canadian market? Same thing do you know? Off to check my books to see if they are British or American or Canadian editions.

ETA...I just checked my daughter copy of Anne of Green Gables...it's a Baronet Books publication out of New York and it's definitely a "simplified" version although it doesn't say that anywhere on the cover but inside its says "specially adapted version" but doesn't say "adapted for what"

Well guess I have to buy her a Canadian copy...wow, who would have thought...I have my own copy (a first edition that I am very proud of) so I haven't read this actual edition until just now!

Thanks Britishmum for pointing this out!
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#303 of 426 Old 11-11-2004, 04:58 PM
 
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Originally Posted by allgirls
ETA...I just checked my daughter copy of Anne of Green Gables...it's a Baronet Books publication out of New York and it's definitely a "simplified" version although it doesn't say that anywhere on the cover but inside its says "specially adapted version" but doesn't say "adapted for what"

Well guess I have to buy her a Canadian copy
I don't think that's the case. Any time you see "adapted" or similar words or another author listed (inside, of course, never on the cover) the work is dumbed down. There are two or three extensive lines of adapted classics out there. Sometimes this is done to make "classics" more accessible to younger children and usually the results are less than satisfactory. In many cases, not only the language but also the content of the book is altered. There was another Salon.com article discussing his, written by a mama who (at least at the time) was a memeber here: Abridged Too Far. If anyone is interested in reading it and can't access it (I think non-members just have to click through some ads), I can email it. With respect to abridgements and retellings, in most cases I'd rather wait until DD is old enough to read the original. Oh, and my parents sent DD an adapted copy of Anne last year (wasn't in the house long), this one from a Canadian publishing house.
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#304 of 426 Old 11-11-2004, 06:40 PM
 
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Originally Posted by NoHiddenFees
I don't think that's the case. Any time you see "adapted" or similar words or another author listed (inside, of course, never on the cover) the work is dumbed down. There are two or three extensive lines of adapted classics out there. Sometimes this is done to make "classics" more accessible to younger children and usually the results are less than satisfactory. In many cases, not only the language but also the content of the book is altered. There was another Salon.com article discussing his, written by a mama who (at least at the time) was a memeber here: Abridged Too Far. If anyone is interested in reading it and can't access it (I think non-members just have to click through some ads), I can email it. With respect to abridgements and retellings, in most cases I'd rather wait until DD is old enough to read the original. Oh, and my parents sent DD an adapted copy of Anne last year (wasn't in the house long), this one from a Canadian publishing house.
I am unsure what you mean "I don't think that's the case" do you mean it's not "simplified" or something else?

I totally agree with what you are saying and I don't mind buying books that are made easier for kids such as a version of Taming of the Shrew I bought for my daughter...nice kids version but it was obvious it was a simplified version. With this book I thought I was buying a copy of an Anne book not a new/different or adapted version...my daughter was way ready for the "real" Anne. She is 14 and I bought this a few years ago...she is an avid reader and read this back then.

Thanks for the link..I will check that out
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#305 of 426 Old 11-11-2004, 06:52 PM
 
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Originally Posted by allgirls
I am unsure what you mean "I don't think that's the case" do you mean it's not "simplified" or something else?
Sorry for being so vague. The edition you have is absolutely simplified. I just meant that you I don't think there's any difference between unadapted unabridged American and Canadian editions of the Anne books save spelling. I'd be saddened to find out if there were.
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#306 of 426 Old 11-11-2004, 11:47 PM
 
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Oh, I gotcha! LOL..I am sure there are no differences between the unadapted American and Canadian editions..

Guess I was also probably thinking that us Canadians wouldn't mess with Anne...we treasure her too much...I may be naive so I may check that out... however I am Canadian which is why I said I should pick up a Canadian edition...Got the "shop Canadian" slogan on the brain I guess!
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#307 of 426 Old 11-12-2004, 01:46 AM
 
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Originally Posted by allgirls
Guess I was also probably thinking that us Canadians wouldn't mess with Anne...we treasure her too much...I may be naive so I may check that out... however I am Canadian which is why I said I should pick up a Canadian edition...Got the "shop Canadian" slogan on the brain I guess!
I'm Canadian too (been in the US for the last seven years), hence my horror at the thought that the US and Canadian editions might be substantively different.
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#308 of 426 Old 11-12-2004, 03:53 AM
 
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This really isn't a "gifted" issue, as far as I know, but since we're all still mommies here, I need some advice on some behavior Sam's been having lately that has been on my mind. He's beginning to have some issues concerning perfectionism. I know that frustration with things is a perfectly normal toddler thing, but this just seems to be something a little more. For example, Sam really loves to draw. At about 26 months he went through a period where he was very intense about drawing and wanted to draw every day, several times a day, for long periods of time. I have stacks of papers covered with pictures of pairs of glasses, rolls of tape, rocking chairs (Blues Clues) along with pictures of people, complete with all their parts (he even went through a phase where he drew EVERYBODY with glasses). Anyway, he lost interest after about a month or so, but has recently come back to it. Today he was drawing "purple striped lolipops", which look exactly how they sound. He had filled up a couple of pages of them, drawing the same thing, over and over, focused very intensely, almost like he was trying to perfect the art of drawing purple striped lolipops. I'd suggest other things he could draw, but he'd just say "no thank you" without even looking up from what he was doing. A couple of times however, he would make what he considered to be a "mistake". He would pound his fists, angrily scribble over what he was working on and throw his paper. I'd tell him that his picture was great and he'd yell "NO, it's not really great at ALL!" or he'd say "I just don't want it to look THAT way!". I have noticed this type of behavior with other things, he can't get his blocks to do a certain thing or he wants a certain toy to stand a certain way and it just won't. I don't want you guys to think I try and pressure him to be perfect, I don't, I really don't know where all this is coming from. I try to tell him it's okay, everybody makes mistakes, you can try again, everything doesn't have to be perfect. None of that seems to make a difference. My main concern is that he'll begin to not try things if he thinks they can't be perfect ( I worry about this, because I can be this way and it can stop you from doing things you really want to and as his mom I don't want anything to hold him back). Anyway, did anyone go through this with their kids, and if so, did you find any ways that helped encourage them to get past this and try things even if they knew ahead of time, they couldn't make it perfect. Thanks in advance for your advice!
J
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#309 of 426 Old 11-12-2004, 04:37 AM
 
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Originally Posted by luvmypoonchkie
This really isn't a "gifted" issue, as far as I know, but since we're all still mommies here, I need some advice on some behavior Sam's been having lately that has been on my mind. He's beginning to have some issues concerning perfectionism.
It's absolutely a gifted issue, one of the textbook issues as a matter of fact. I was a terrible perfectionist until starting my slow decline in my early 20's and have tried from the outset to help make this as much of a non-issue as possible with our children. It's paralysing.

The first thing we've tried to do is to make examples of ourselves failing gracefully and in a matter of fact manner, but with considerable verbosity. "Ooops, that's not quite right, hmmmm, what if I try this?" "Well, that didn't work, let's clean that up and start over. I think I know what went wrong." "That's not it, but I did learn something new, look." It's tough. We don't comment, however, on DD1's level of frustration or try to assure her that xxxx is no big deal. This is entirely by example. For those times her frustration level becomes too great, redirection isn't working anymore, but we've been practicing (when not frustrated) leaving projects unfinished and then returning the next day.

The second thing we do (and this is even more difficult) is never, ever use praise. We talk extensively about what she's doing and what she's done. We show great interest and take her thoughts very seriously, but I think it's especially important that kids with perfectionist tendencies don't become praise junkies. They have to know that we value them for who and what they are, not what tricks they can do.

Here's a few articles on perfectionism at Hoagie's.
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#310 of 426 Old 11-12-2004, 11:59 AM
 
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Originally Posted by NoHiddenFees
I'm Canadian too (been in the US for the last seven years), hence my horror at the thought that the US and Canadian editions might be substantively different.

Oh my, I wonder...that would be horrible...just read an exerpt from the original Anne...oh the beautiful language...it is so well written...I need to bring my copy up from Nfld..it's at my mom's. I love the language of Anne
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#311 of 426 Old 11-12-2004, 01:15 PM
 
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Originally Posted by NoHiddenFees
The second thing we do (and this is even more difficult) is never, ever use praise. We talk extensively about what she's doing and what she's done. We show great interest and take her thoughts very seriously, but I think it's especially important that kids with perfectionist tendencies don't become praise junkies. They have to know that we value them for who and what they are, not what tricks they can do.
This is along the same lines as what I was going to suggest, but a bit different. I've worked teaching preschool classes in several different informal environments (children's museums/zoos/churches), and the current thought in the child-development world is that we praise specific things, not just make blanket "that's perfect, sweetie!" type of comments. For example, with the lollipop drawings when he got frustrated, you might have said, "I'm sorry that's not how you wanted it to look - but look how straight you drew the lolipop stick!" or "I like the way you put one big lollipop in the middle of the page, with smaller ones around it." That shows the child that you're really looking at what they're drawing, and you're commenting on specifics.

I would never completely withhold praise. I just think how I would feel if my husband made that policy in dealing with me, or my boss did that... It would hurt me, and I don't want to do that to my child. (And I went through all the perfectionist tendancies myself as a child, so I do understand it from both points of view. I remember in first grade choosing to finish my classwork completely and perfectly rather than participate in recess.)

Mama to DS (05/04) and DD (11/05), married to a wonderful DH.
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#312 of 426 Old 11-12-2004, 03:52 PM
 
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Hollis is a huge perfectionist and he sees praise almost as an insult. If I give blanket praise, he knows it's because I'm trying to make him feel better (which actually makes him feel worse) and if I praise certain parts of what he's done, he just thinks of all the other parts he hasn't done perfectly. So I have to be really careful the way I phrase praise.

Generally I wait until he compliments himself. This week he made a poster with molecules cut out of construction paper and taped together piece by piece. A project like that is a pretty big deal for him since he doesn't really enjoy cutting things out. Anyway, he was justifiably proud of it so I felt safe in agreeing with him that the poster was cool.
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#313 of 426 Old 11-12-2004, 08:14 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Queen of Cups
I would never completely withhold praise.
Withholding praise does not equate to withholding enthusiasm or not talking about what the child is doing. For me the only thing constituting the non-use of praise is the absence of value judgements: good/bad; like/dislike; etc. I guess the difference would be that, if she were receptive, I would talk about the arrangement of lollipops in the painting but not use the word "like." And I'm only talking about external accomplishments: I genuinely like that she's a good person, has a great sense of humour, and other things to do with her character, and am not shy about telling her. [I do use "like" rather than "love" when talking about character traits because I'm careful to tell her that I always "love" her and that's never dependent on anything.]
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#314 of 426 Old 11-13-2004, 05:49 PM
 
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My main concern is that he'll begin to not try things if he thinks they can't be perfect ( I worry about this, because I can be this way and it can stop you from doing things you really want to and as his mom I don't want anything to hold him back). Anyway, did anyone go through this with their kids, and if so, did you find any ways that helped encourage them to get past this and try things even if they knew ahead of time, they couldn't make it perfect.
I think an important first step for me was to deal with my own perfectionism, and learn to accept it. To know that being a perfectionist is no more an "issue" as being Asian or a woman. It presents certain special circumstances to deal with, but there's nothing wrong with it. Nothing to cure. To accept that being a perfectionist is totally normal and healthy (that comes when you accept the traits of giftedness).

Then I sought alternative perspectives. I asked people about their perspectives and listened carefully. It was very helpful to see how other people operated and to notice that all people choose different things to focus on. This helped me see that I wasn't "bad" for not focusing on any particular thing. And as with many other traits in myself that I found undesirable, I play-acted being different. I started this self-therapy method first when I started teaching, and I needed to become more commanding. Then I play-acted being a bitch, to try to overcome my intense push-over-ness. One of the things I playacted was being homey Mommy who noticed nothing but her children's laughter. I did this in public for years, on and off. And a few people actually told me that I was inspiring to them, that they could never be like that themselves (ha!). One thing I've been trying to play act now is the absent-minded creative. I'm trying to clean without noticing the mess. To be wildly inspired and dramatic, without the constant focus on how awful things are to me (which they always are, by the way, in some way).

The amazing thing about play-acting is that it allows you the opportunity to try out different personnas and personalities without losing control of your own. Without even criticism of your own. It allows you the opportunity to try personalities out and see if it could fit with you, and to what degree. And inevitably, you become more compassionate and more accepting of others not like yourself, and more compassionate and accepting of yourself. So this is what I do with my kids. I try to play act, I get them to play act. My #1 is 4, and we play act ALL THE FREAKING TIME!!! This was really helpful to help her deal with her sister and her friends, by having her work issues out safely with me. I would pretend to be #2, or she would, or whatever. With the perfectionist thing, I would sometimes make a HUGE deal out of something I did wrong. Like if I spilled something on the counter, instead of wiping it up, I would start yelling like I was so so so so very mad at myself. #1 would comfort me, and I would be helpless, asking her what to do. She would tell me words we tell her: "it's alright, the good thing about a mess is that you can always clean it up" "it's okay, Mommy, I can help you make more" "that's not a big deal, Mommy, it's just a little deal." This kind of interaction has allowed her to experience a different perspective. Not really, 'cause we're just playacting, and it's very important that you all understand the play acting aspect of it, or else it could be really scary for kids. But, in play acting, #1 has been able to really rethink different struggles in her life from alternative perspectives.

It might not be for everyone, but you might give it a go. It's lots of fun too, and it's therapeutic for youself. I've almost cried many times in the midst of a perfectionist "pretend" breakdown. The feelings are real. My frustrations from my past are intense. Besides, everyone deserves a good break-down now and then, play-acting it is so much kinder on our self-esteems.

Pei
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#315 of 426 Old 11-18-2004, 11:25 AM
 
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Thanks for sharing all of that...wow...wish I had you guys around when my oldest daughter was younger...but she's pretty good now...

Sophia is now fascinated with cats...my ten year old has 2 big hard cover books on cats...we read them and look at the pictures...she also LOVES the Garfield Movie which the kids gave my DH for his birthday...she cries for it and it's hard...her movies are only 20 minutes long, this is a full length feature film and too much tv for a 16 mos old...what do I do...she sat through the entire movie. and my stuffed Garfield is now her Lovey...she is sleeping with him now. We have 2 cats and boy does she love them...but she doesn't like dogs...showed her the cutest puppy yesterday, shied away. She was scared by a puppy at 4mos old and hasn't gotten over it. We have a dog..she's afraid of her too.

Inlaws are gone and it's just me and her all day again. She's amazing! I love having her all to myself again.

As to the praise thing...Sophia hangs her head in embarrassment over excessive praise...but a simple high five and "you did it" she is thrilled over.

Hope you ladies and your families are all well.

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#316 of 426 Old 11-18-2004, 02:50 PM
 
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i've never posted here before and hope it's ok if i ask a question.

when your children were babies, did they start reacting when you took something away from them that they shouldn't have, like a toddler would, at around maybe 4 months? maybe this is normal, just curious.
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#317 of 426 Old 11-18-2004, 05:14 PM - Thread Starter
 
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my kids both did, but i think that's pretty normal, especially if they're interested n what they're holding. i could be wrong, though... but yeah, both of mine did/do this. my 4.5 month old really enjoys putting clothing of any description in her mouth, and she flips if i take it away before she's finished.

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#318 of 426 Old 11-18-2004, 05:28 PM
 
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yep Sophia did...she would cry and reach and be really upset...I don't remember if the older girls did though. I know her eyes would follow it out of sight and she would reach...and I think it was probably earlier than that...Ithink it's pretty normal...I think.
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#319 of 426 Old 11-18-2004, 10:15 PM
 
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There's a new board for parents of highly/profoundly gifted children here:

http://disc.server.com/Indices/226130.html

The new board is (lightly) moderated so it shouldn't have the same problems of P&P, for those of you who were on there in the past.
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#320 of 426 Old 11-19-2004, 02:52 PM
 
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I have a question, need opinions....

Ok...I am not a fan of television for children, particularly little ones....we have a television with cable which has parental controls on it. My older girls (14 and 10) watch certain favourite shows and I watch Coronation St. and some Canadian shows but not much~ok I do watch one Soap but not everyday~I can take it or leave it basically. I did watch Hockey but there is a strike on and I always tape my shows and watch them when children are not up. And if there are special news reports on then I watch. We only have one television so if it's on for the kids Sophia is often around.

I do play movies for the family if we have a family night but not cartoons..I hate cartoons.

Sophia is 16.5 mos old. She is not the least bit interested in Children's television. I used a baby Einsein video so I could pee when she was little occasionally.

anyway my older girls gave my husband the Garfield movie...we sat and watched it together as a family...we loved it...and Sophia watched the entire thing.

Sophia became very attached to it. She cries for it. She wants it on all the time...of course I don't let her and she has to watch the whole thing when I do put it on, she flips if I turn it off before she's finished. A couple times I have played it for her and she gets so excited. She will sit by herself and watch the entire movie.

I have also noticed she likes news shows...she will go and watch CNN like when I had the American election on or if there is a breaking story I will turn on the news. She is seemingly fascinated by what people are saying however if her sister is watching Lizzie McQuire she's not the least bit interested. Her older sister tried to get her to watch Blues Clues and Dora with her and no way, didn't hold her attention.

So lately I have been watching the 6 oclock news..she will go and sit and watch it. Not sure I approve as news can be disturbing but anyway

Isn't this a little bit odd? Is she actually absorbing what they are saying or is she just fascinated with language and talking. If it was just the television wouldn't she be absorbed by children's television.

I am not concerned really, I am watching to make sure she doesn't get too much and to make sure there is nothing scary. I just wonder...what the heck does a 16 mos old see in Wolfe Blitzer!

Anyway, any comments, suggestions..should I let her watch Garfield occasionally?

Thanks ladies
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#321 of 426 Old 11-19-2004, 08:11 PM
 
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I don't see anything wrong with letting her watch the movie once in a while, but then I'm not anti-TV. Hollis loved to watch Wheel of Fortune and other game shows when he was a baby/toddler and it actually seemed to stimulate his creativity.
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#322 of 426 Old 11-19-2004, 09:52 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I also liked the news when I was 16 months old. I used to watch it while I sat on my potty in front of the TV. :LOL Goodness, what a memory!

The shows that are aimed at kids are really overstimulating for a lot of children. Some are better than others; take a look at Oswald and Sesame street, and you can see a huge difference. The news is generally much less visually stimulating.

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#323 of 426 Old 11-20-2004, 12:27 AM
 
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Oh, and I forgot her favourite...Dr. Phil...she runs to watch him(I don't watch much but I did watch the interviews with the Bush's and the Kerry's and she was very into it...

I know I read about "flicker" on television and how it mesmersized children but I guess regular adult television might not have that.

You may be right about kids tv being too stimulating..she's very sensitive to light and sound and noise so that could be it...she maybe prefers more bland tv...like Dr. Phil!

Maybe I should just put on the Discovery channel and see if that interests her. I mean there are things to be learned and she can't read yet but she can hear and understand quite a bit.

You can remember 16 mos...wow...my earliest memory is of my Grandmother's house. I don't remember how old I was but it was torn down before I was 3 and she hadn't lived in it for a year before so I was younger than 2.

My aunt and uncle sat me in front of the tv to watch the moon landing but I don't remember that. I was 3...guess I just wasn't impressed!


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#324 of 426 Old 11-23-2004, 09:36 AM - Thread Starter
 
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I definately remember snippets of 12-15 months, large chunks of 15-18 months, and then after that my memories are pretty much solid up to the present day (with exceptions for psychotic episodes, drug binges and drunken blackouts. ). I even remember becoming self aware, I think I wrote about it on the first "gifted children" thread.

Definately try the Discovery channel. BeanBean likes National Geographic channel and The Weather Channel; maps that light up and have moving stuff over them, it doesn't get any better! :LOL My niece is always trying to get him to watch kid shows but he prefers weather maps. :LOL I may get the cable turned back on at home just so we can watch them again. *sigh*

Yesterday, at his 2 year WCC, BeanBean told the doctor that "A noun is a person, place, thing, or idea!" :LOL He laughed and said "yes, but does he know what that means?" I said "maybe not, but he did tell me the other week that caterpillar is a noun." Then BeanBean chimed in and said "And butterfly! It's a noun!" The doctor about fell over. This all followed him asking "Is he speaking in two or three word sentences?" :LOL : Go BeanBean! :LOL

Rynna, Mama to Bean (8), Boobah (6), Bella (4) and Bear (2)
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#325 of 426 Old 11-23-2004, 08:28 PM
 
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Your story of your son's 2 year visit reminded me of Sam's 2 year. Up until that point he was TERRIFIED of the doctor because up until then he'd gotten shots at his visits. When the doctor would ask how he was doing developmentally I would just say "fine". The only time I had taken him to the doctor for a developmental issue was when he developed a little bit of a stutter. Anyway, we were in an examining room that has a space themed wallpaper border with planets and stars, ect... The doctor had just finished the exam and Sam says to him "Dr. ***** where's the sun?". The doctor says "Oh, well, the Sun is outside, and you're inside, so you can't see it". Sam says "No, where's the sun up THERE (pointing to the wallpaper), I don't see it, it's missing, I see Saturn and Jupiter and Pluto and Neptune and Earth (you get the picture) but I don't see the Sun. Do you know where the Sun is?" Like your doc, ours jaw hit the ground. He then pointed to individual planets and asked Sam which ones they were. They weren't in order, yet he knew them all based on their characteristics, like "Oh, that's Saturn, see it's icy rings, and that's Pluto, Pluto is VERY small". At our next visit, Sam was a chatterbox and while I was talking with the doctor he was pretending to be Uncle Scar acting out an entire scene from Lion King complete with correct dialougue and adjusting his accent to suit whose line he was reciting. The doctor kept looking at his chart and saying "How old is he? He's only 2, he's at the verbal level of a 4 or 5 year old". I don't plan on bringing it up at the 3 year visit, but I wonder what he'd say about the reading.
I also wanted to share an early memory of my own. I can remember some things from the first house my family lived in (we moved from there when I was 18 months). It's funny, because I can remember not only things or events, but what I was thinking at the time. I remember a time when I was in my crib. I had this doll I called "Honey Baby" (I think that was her actual name on the box). Anyway, I remember being in my crib and shaking the doll and there was something rattling around in her head. I remember thinking that if I chewed a hole in her face, whatever was in there would come out, and I really wanted to know what was in there, so I chewed a hole in here face. I'd always had that memory, but I also still had my Honey Baby until I was a young girl and she had no hole in her face. I told my mom one day that I had this strange memory of being in my crib and chewing a hole in Honey Baby's face, but it was probably just a dream I had because the doll was intact. She said that what I remembered had actually happened and when she saw I chewed a hole in the doll's face she bought a new one and told me she fixed the hole. I have several other memories from the same time, but that one just sticks out. After 2 or so everything is clear though. It's too funny how memory works.
J
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#326 of 426 Old 11-24-2004, 12:35 AM
 
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I need help understanding why this thread is in the section where us other parents are heartborken or struggling with our children having developmental disabilities. It seems cruel to me.

Can someone help me understand this?
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#327 of 426 Old 11-24-2004, 01:14 AM
 
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First of all I'd like to say that I'm so sorry that the posts on this thread have been hurtful and that I'm sure nobody ever posted here with that intention. I can't understand completely because I can't begin to even fathom how difficult the things some of you are going through are, but I can see where you are coming from. Like you, my child is the joy of my life, and no matter what he is, I love him more than I could ever express in words. It's just nice to be able to come anonomously to a forum and discuss things with other parents in the same situation. I started posting here well after the thread was established, but if the others who post here are for it I agree that there probably is a more appropriate forum for this thread.

You're in my thoughts and prayers,
Sorry again,
J
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#328 of 426 Old 11-24-2004, 03:10 AM
 
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I can understand you question, and I have love and compassion in my heart for your struggles.

This is in Special Needs Parenting, gifted children have special needs. I can totally understand your query. I hope this is of assistance.

Hunger is political.  Wherever there is widespread hunger, it is because people with guns are preventing other people from bringing in food.  
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#329 of 426 Old 11-24-2004, 03:57 AM
 
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Slight vent...

Why do some people ask why it is important for a two and a half year old to know certain things? I have mentioned that my DD learned about many things watching TV such as photosynthesis. I know TV isn't great, and I am not advocating it, what I am saying is that she learned from it; and the problem about it was that she learned. I asked is it ok then to learn from a book, but not from TV, and the response was - why it is important for a child of that age to learn things like that? I am feeling like I can't say, "well, because she is a fast learner and likes this stuff" because it will insult someone.

What am I supposed to say, "Darling, stop watching that nature documentary, put down your book, and just eat your playdough like you're supposed to."? I am made to feel like I am pushing her. I am getting tired of this.

Hunger is political.  Wherever there is widespread hunger, it is because people with guns are preventing other people from bringing in food.  
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#330 of 426 Old 11-26-2004, 05:10 PM
 
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Calm...I hear you...I get that I must be pushing her when she does something somewhat advanced...yet I often am afraid I am not doing enough because I work so hard to just let her be.

And who is to say what's important and what's not...

also as for learning from books vs television, I think I have really put my ten year old at a disadvantage because I limit tv since she is dyslexic...she would have learned so much more if I had allowed her to watch television since she just wasn't learning it from books. And now she's behind.

to the mom with the question as to why we are here. I don't know that this is the best place for us but it sure is a nice safe place. I hope we haven't hurt you too much and I am sorry if anything I have posted has caused you pain in some way..hugs.
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