Support for Parents of Gifted Children, #3 - Page 5 - Mothering Forums
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#121 of 366 Old 02-19-2005, 12:18 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Well, today it finally came... the inevitable moment of The Outpacing. Hollis asked to do some math today (algebra) and he intuitively grasped the meaning/solution of the problem, while I had to hunt around in another math book just to figure out how to approach it.

My mom teaches at the high school so she is going to ask around and see if one of the juniors or seniors can come tutor him either this spring or (more likely) next fall, as part of a community service thing they have there. Until then I will just try to keep up with him using our CDs and books in case he asks for help. Wish me luck. :
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#122 of 366 Old 02-19-2005, 12:31 AM
 
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Originally Posted by eilonwy
She's got a 3.5 year old who's still nursing, and she said something about being the only parent she knows who wonders if her child will read before she weans. I cracked up laughing, because I don't wonder at all: I'm 90% certain that BeanBean won't wean until heck freezes over, and that he'll certainly read before then. :LOL
I'm ROFLOL here, because the way I got Ben to NIGHT-wean, at age 3 1/2, was to write/print out/staple together an easy reader type story about "a boy called Ben, who was the sweetest little boy you could ever hope to meet", and how he learned not to have milk at night, "just like his friends Suzy, and Ally, and Sam and baby David". After he had read this to himself several times over a period of a few weeks, he finally managed to make it to 7am without diving up my pajamas and received a "big, shiny new boat" as in the book.

I thought it would be cool to try and get it published, but on reflection realized that the target audience - night-nursers at the easy-reader level - would probably be rather limited.

ETA: I just read your shirt story, Rynna, and it's not only priceless but a perfect illustration of that gifted kid unevenness!
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#123 of 366 Old 02-19-2005, 01:42 AM
 
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I thought it would be cool to try and get it published, but on reflection realized that the target audience - night-nursers at the easy-reader level - would probably be rather limited.
You could still make a pdf for people to print at home.

I didn't have a problem night weaning DD1 (she dropped it herself when my milk dried up during pregnancy and she stopped napping), but I swear she's never going to give it up entirely. I asked her the other day if she thought her half-birthday this summer would be a good time for a weaning party. She responded that she doesn't intend to wean until she's five... and she means it! She's already reading at a 2-3rd grade level, let's hope she weans before she starts Tolstoy; everybody has to draw a line somewhere, right?
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#124 of 366 Old 02-19-2005, 04:13 AM
 
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Originally Posted by lckrause
Well, today it finally came... the inevitable moment of The Outpacing. Hollis asked to do some math today (algebra) and he intuitively grasped the meaning/solution of the problem, while I had to hunt around in another math book just to figure out how to approach it.

My mom teaches at the high school so she is going to ask around and see if one of the juniors or seniors can come tutor him either this spring or (more likely) next fall, as part of a community service thing they have there. Until then I will just try to keep up with him using our CDs and books in case he asks for help. Wish me luck. :
Good luck! I have to tell you, I really miss math! Math is one of my "things." My brother and I used to play algebra games when we were 7 and 8. The only algebraic concept I had a hard time with was algebraic long division, and once I got to calc II it suddenly made sense (in other words, I had a reason to give a hoot about it at all). It's the one thing that I wish I'd done more of in school, but I couldn't sit through it for a whole year. If only I'd been able to cram it in, a semester at a time the way they do it in college!

Oh! Did you ever find "Einstein's Dreams" for Hollis?

I'm kind of jealous that you get to start the fun math and I don't, except that I'm really not in any hurry for my kids to grow up any more than they already have. I may just pull a calc book off the shelf when I get home, or maybe some physics...:LOL Okay, I'm weird; but we've got *loads* of text books around.

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I thought it would be cool to try and get it published, but on reflection realized that the target audience - night-nursers at the easy-reader level - would probably be rather limited.
The other day I jokingly asked BeanBean if he plans to wean. He shrugged and said "every kid weans eventually." It was hilarious, because that's my answer when anyone asks me when he's going to wean, shrug and everything. :LOL

I think your book has a broader market than that-- parents would love reading it to their night nursing toddlers. I really think you should get it published, there is definately a need for it and there is nothing like it around. All you really need is good illustrations.

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She's already reading at a 2-3rd grade level, let's hope she weans before she starts Tolstoy; everybody has to draw a line somewhere, right?
Most of us do. For me, the absolute final line is puberty. I refuse to nurse a pubescent child, that's just too weird for me! Hopefully my kids will either be late bloomers like Mike or they'll wean before they're 9. :LOL

Rynna, Mama to Bean (8), Boobah (6), Bella (4) and Bear (2)
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#125 of 366 Old 02-19-2005, 06:04 PM
 
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Originally Posted by eilonwy
. I feel like I don't belong anywhere, because my kids don't fit into a neat little group.

I don't know, maybe I'm projecting. Maybe my kids are perfectly normal, and I'm overcomplicating things.

Two thoughts come to mind:

1) You belong here, with the other parents dealing with this stuff!

2) Your kids are normal *for them*, and normal for your family. They're unfolding just as they're meant to, thanks to their thoughtful and understanding Mom.

Be kind to yourself, Rynna! They're lucky to have you!

WRT the story, so how do you think one would go about getting somethin like that published? I actually was quite pleased with how it worked out - it seemed to have flow and it did the trick! (Actually, I should credit Elizabeth pANTLEY AND "tHE nO-cRY sLEEP sOlution" - I was one of her test Moms and she suggested the idea.) Any ideas, anyone??
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#126 of 366 Old 02-19-2005, 09:21 PM
 
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Mind if I come lurk here? I am the mama of two wonderful little girls who keep me hopping. I guess it never really occured to me to think of them as "gifted" but everywhere I go people (DD's preschool teacher, parents of gifted kids, etc.) tell me my oldest is gifted, and since my youngest is just like her and then some I'm guess she might fit into the "gifted" category too.

It's so weird for me to start labeling my kids and to be honest I'm not sure why people think the girls are gifted, but I won't rule it out. I guess most 2-year olds don't use words like "apparently" and "actually" correctly in sentences (which my first did frequently) and that most don't just sit down and figure so many things out. It's hard for me to think of them as anything other than "normal". I mean they are my normal, yk?

And if indeed they are gifted, which I suppose wouldn't be out of the question as I was in all the gifted classes in school and apparently have a pretty high IQ, and both DH and I did very well in school, what should I be doing for them now? I haven't really been doing any sort of academics with either one as I'm in the "later is better camp" as far as formal teaching goes, but I don't want to hold them back either. It's very important to me that they can reach their full potential (which probably sounds weird considering I haven't done any formal lessons with my 4-year old), so if I'm missing out on things I should be doing now I'd love to hear about it.

My first knew all the letters shortly after her second birthday since she got a letter puzzle for her birthday, however she's 4.5 now and only doing basic reading and I guess I thought spontaneous early reading was part of being gifted? I've never done any sort of reading teaching with either girl. My second is 22-mos and only knows colors, shapes and numbers, not letters. She does have this odd ability to puzzle things out that she's never been taught. It's sort of eerie, but I figured it was just a second child thing. We read tons together pretty much every day. We spend a lot of time outdoors as my first is very interested in nature and my second loves to run.

I am looking into schooling options for my first since she will be kindergarten age next year. My top choice groups kids based on ability instead of age, which I think should work well for a gifted child or any child who learns faster (or slower) than the norm. The groups are small (5 kids per adult) and from what I understand can change through the year if one kid were to move past where the rest of the group is. I read here a couple times that homeschooling is the only option for gifted kids. Can anyone tell me if that is just opposed to a traditional school setting or would it apply to a less traditional setting as well? I was so bored in school and want to see what I can do to help my girls love school.

Sorry for so many questions. I was so excited to find this thread I just thought I'd get all the questions out at once. Okay, back to reading and lurking.

edited to add: My first also seems to show some sort of musical giftedness. She has perfect pitch and it seems she only has to hear a song once or twice before she knows all the words. Is that separate from this thread or does it sort of go along with the whole gifted thing?

Mama to three sweet girls (a dramatic, chatty 10yo, a bouncy, dynamo of a 7yo, and a delightful, whimsical 3.5yo)
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#127 of 366 Old 02-19-2005, 09:26 PM
 
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Originally Posted by lckrause
Rynna, Nan started walking at 8 months. Get ready! At 10 months I had to put away her high chair because she could climb in and out of it herself and undo the buckle (!). At 11 months she could climb the playground equipment and go down the slide by herself (did THAT ever freak people out) and once when she was a toddler (under 18 months but I don't remember the exact age) I found her on top of the refrigerator. To this day I don't know how she got up there!

On the plus side she is now the best in her dance classes...
oh my goodness, maybe there is hope for my second dd afterall. i haven't found her on top of the refrigerator yet, but man i do find her in some strange places and wonder how she got there. she also climbs everything and anything. i find all my neighbors with terrified looks on their faces as she runs and jumps and climbs everything in sight.

and fwiw, she doesn't sleep much either. yawn.

Mama to three sweet girls (a dramatic, chatty 10yo, a bouncy, dynamo of a 7yo, and a delightful, whimsical 3.5yo)
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#128 of 366 Old 02-19-2005, 09:32 PM
 
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Have any of you seen the highly sensitive tribe or read, "The Highly Sensitive Child"? I'm half-way through the book and it's really resonating with me. It seems like a lot of it is muddied by introverted characteristics. It also seems like there's spill-over into gifted issues. These are children who can be moved to tears by a performance. They are highly creative children who live in their private worlds. Mine does not cry at performances, but he is extremely creative. Any object in our house, ATM slips included, are basically raw materials to him. He brings me random pieces of cardboard and says that it's a digger's shovel. And there's just the fine-tuned perception of details that results in being overwhelmed. I'm finding the book interesting. I was wondering if any of you are familiar with it.

Here's the website with a questionnaire:
http://www.hsperson.com/pages/test_child.htm
wow, that questionnaire is like a description of my oldest. i think i could answer yes to every single one. maybe i'll put that book on my reading list. thanks for the link and suggestion.

Mama to three sweet girls (a dramatic, chatty 10yo, a bouncy, dynamo of a 7yo, and a delightful, whimsical 3.5yo)
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#129 of 366 Old 02-19-2005, 09:43 PM
 
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My mother says that very early walking is very common in second & third gifted babies, because they want to follow the older ones. It makes sense, and it seems like I'm hearing about a lot of second babies who walked really early. Miss BooBah, just today, took three steps and started laughing hysterically before she fell on her tush.

Welcome, momtokay! I totally know what you mean about the reading-- I really thought that my son might not be as bright as I thought because he hadn't already taught himself how to read within a month of his second birthday. He's teaching himself now, though, and doing all sorts of other things. He's just.. a BeanBean. Anyway, not every gifted kid reads at two, and not every two year old reader is a gifted kid. The two are only superficially related. It's true that many children who (teach themselves) to read very early are gifted children, perhaps even the majority, but there are loads of gifted kids who don't learn to read until later. My husband certainly qualifies as gifted, but he didn't learn to read until he was around four years old. I've got two sisters who both learned to read in school; one has an IQ around 150 and the other is in the 185+ range, easily.

In short, the fact that at 4.5 she's reading very little doesn't really mean much in terms of her giftedness or lack thereof.

My two year old says "actually" in sentences. He's also a big fan of "incredible!" and "unbelievable!" :LOL The absolute funniest thing is the way he answers questions. If I ask him, for example, if he pooped in the potty he will respond either, "I did" or "I did not." I have no idea where this came from, because neither Mike nor I talks that way. It's strange, and adorable. He's so cute when he says things like "No, mamma, I do not need to go potty. I need a nursie!" :LOL

The lack of sleep is definately a gifted child thing (although, again, not every child who requires less sleep is gifted, and there are plenty of gifted children who need a lot of sleep), one which I am really working on these days. It's very difficult to have an 8 month old who needs only an hour or two more sleep than you do.

Rynna, Mama to Bean (8), Boobah (6), Bella (4) and Bear (2)
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#130 of 366 Old 02-20-2005, 12:33 PM - Thread Starter
 
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About the schooling... some gifted kids do fine in school. I think it depends on a few things:

1. How gifted the child is. It does seem that the more out there a kid is in terms of intelligence, the less likely it is that a normal school environment will suit them.

2. The child's temperament. Kids who are exceptionally gifted socially in addition to intellectually may do fine in school, being able to handle the things that would stress out other gifted kids.

3. The school. Some schools may cater better to gifted kids. However, from what I've seen, it's a rare school (even a rare "gifted program") that can provide what a highly or profoundly gifted child needs. Schools by nature are normed towards the lower end of the middle... making sure all kids pass without taxing the system too much. Big problems there if your kid is on either end of the bell curve. And even in a gifted school/program, the lower IQ requirement is usually 130, so highly/profoundly gifted kids (with IQs 160 or more) will still be an order of magnitude separated from the school's focus.

So, if you're considering putting your child in school, I'd look more at 1 and 2 than 3. Don't count on the school to cater to your child.
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#131 of 366 Old 02-20-2005, 01:23 PM
 
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So, if you're considering putting your child in school, I'd look more at 1 and 2 than 3. Don't count on the school to cater to your child.
I heartily agree. If you have a choice, I think that homeschooling is probably the best option especially if your child is highly/profoundly gifted or if they are very asyncrhonous in terms of social and emotional development.

I still tell people that if my mother had waited for me to be socially and emotionally ready for kindergarten, I'd have gone when I was 19. In terms of academics, I was ready for kindergarten at around 12 months, meaning I could tell people my full name, address, alphabet, numbers, shapes, colors, etc. Back in the day, kids didn't need anything else for K. For a present-day kindergarten, I was probably closer to 14 months before I was ready. In terms of physical skills, I was probably ready for kindergarten when I was about 7 (I was kind of small for my age, and uncoordinated). In short, I was an ideal candidate for homeschooling, but my mother didn't know a thing about it. It never occurred to her until much later.

I started at 4.5, in an older class (all the kids who'd missed the cutoff the year before) of kids who turned 6 before my 5th birthday. It was too much and not enough all at the same time.

BeanBean, thus far, seems more socially adept than I was. *Much* more! I think he would probably thrive in a social setting with other children, which is why I'm so glad that I'm homeschooling my niece and started a secular homeschool support group here. BeanBean is not the only young child, and he gets to play with kids of all ages. I think that he gets at least as much benefit from it as the older kids do, if not more. BooBah also loves being with the other kids, and ChibiChibi is getting the one and only thing she misses from school (kids to play with). Right now we're only meeting once a month, but I think that in the future bi-weekly meetings may be in order, or at least a few "standing playdates" for the kids. We're having a meeting this afternoon, in fact. I'm bringing some playdough, puzzles, and lacing shapes for the kids, and one of the other moms is bringing juice and graham crackers. In fact, i need to go take a shower. :LOL

Rynna, Mama to Bean (8), Boobah (6), Bella (4) and Bear (2)
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#132 of 366 Old 02-20-2005, 01:50 PM
 
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Originally Posted by lckrause
So, if you're considering putting your child in school, I'd look more at 1 and 2 than 3. Don't count on the school to cater to your child.
Oh thank you for the advice. We've looked at a TON of schools around here. I live near a big city so there are many options which is nice. My oldest is extremely social. She has been spot on at reading other people's emotions and knowing "just" the thing they need to feel better since she was just an infant. I guess that along with her musical "skills" make it so I wouldn't be surprised if she's not more than moderately gifted academically. She didn't start talking until 18 mos, though when she started she started in complete sentences people outside the family could understand, and like I mentioned earlier only reads basic readers at four, so I'm guessing academics might not be her strongest suit. I do hate to speculate though because I want to be sure she is challenged and stimulated academically and would hate to hold her back because of some preconceived notion I have about her.

The reason I think this particular school might be a good place for her is that it's a school of homeschoolers. It only meets three days a week, part of the year. They can give the basics and allow the kids a lot of time to pursue passions and learn/play outside of the classroom. And there are only about 50 kids in the entire school so there is more room for individual attention.

I remember well the "teach to the middle" phenomenon. I remember things like being done with all the first grade readers early in the school year and since they didn't know what to do with me just kept throwing alternative readers my way. They were basically filled with all the same stories in different orders. To this day I don't like the Three Billy Goats Gruff. And I rembember the boredom. The true lack of opportunities for kids who already knew what they were teaching. Once or twice a year there would be some super Saturday program, but in general it didn't matter if you were ahead of the curve. And though I was never told my IQ I'm sure it's not in the profoundly gifted range so I can only imagine how a traditional school would be in that case.

Well, I guess it can't hurt to try something out and if it doesn't end up working out homeschooling is always an option. Thanks again you two!!

Mama to three sweet girls (a dramatic, chatty 10yo, a bouncy, dynamo of a 7yo, and a delightful, whimsical 3.5yo)
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#133 of 366 Old 02-23-2005, 03:45 PM
 
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I love "actually" which seems to be a pretty common two year old thing. We also got a kick of when DD started saying, "Are you being sarcastic?" around the same time. DS, at 3.5, though, is MUCH better at identifying sarcasm, but doesn't identify it as such ("are you joking?")

Just wanted to check in and say hi.

We are really stressing out about school right now. We are currently (un)homeschooling. Considering putting DD in next year. Unfortunatley, we had her tested as a kinder (their first round of testing is the ITBS) and she knew everything except one question BUT, we can't have her retested as a 1st grader instead. So, she would have to go in the gifted 1st grade when my "advisor" is recommending 3rd grade We went to the local pull-out school and they were willing to make NO accomidations--- she could not skip a grade, she could not work up (well, she could work up in 1st because it is a 1/2 split but she would have to stay in the same 1/2 split the next year) so that is out. Still considering the one day a week gifted pull out (instead of the full time) OR homeschooling. Her science teacher (she is in the K-2class, she "should" be in K) said that next year she would like her in the 3-5 class instead which would be nice. Oh, and that they (the homeschooling group) may be able to make an exception for her and let her in the robotics class with the older kids as well (I'm also going to look and see if the 3-5 math class would be hard enough--- the description seems easy, but if it is for 3-5th graders it seems like it might be right on).

WE ARE JUST SO UP IN THE AIR!!!!

Months still to decide, though. And I'm considering putting Ds in a 3s class for pre-school instead of the 4s his age would dictate, :LOL We are very anti-academic preschools (for one, unless they were specifically for gifted it would be long past review) and like the idea of 2 days which is only offered for 3 year olds.



lckrause---- What does your local school district say about Hollis and perhaps paying for his math classes through a community college. An aquaintace has her 11 year old in Calc this year in a high school class since that *is* his level (his 14 year old brother is also doing calc this year, but at the community college since that is what he wants to do). Both are paid for by the district, of course.

 

 

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#134 of 366 Old 02-23-2005, 08:01 PM - Thread Starter
 
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lckrause---- What does your local school district say about Hollis and perhaps paying for his math classes through a community college.
I don't know, we live in a very small rural district so I doubt they'd pay for the classes... although obviously we're going to have to go that way eventually. They did test him when he was 7 and he topped out at 10th grade level math and 8th grade reading, so they're aware of his situation. At least we should be able to do the tutor thing this next school year.

Rynna, thanks for reminding me about the book! I need to check it out.
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#135 of 366 Old 02-23-2005, 08:03 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Still considering the one day a week gifted pull out (instead of the full time) OR homeschooling. Her science teacher (she is in the K-2class, she "should" be in K) said that next year she would like her in the 3-5 class instead which would be nice.
Am I reading this right that you could put her in the one day a week pull out but homeschool her the rest of the time? That would be great.

Lisa
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#136 of 366 Old 02-23-2005, 09:17 PM
 
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I'm confident and compotent through calc II; if my kids want to go farther than that and want help with it, I'll have to send them to school. It's not a problem; in my old district, there was a reciprocal arrangement with the three local colleges (community, state, and private) and the district where kids who were enrolled full time in public school could take classes at the colleges. I found out about it because I was so far ahead in math that if I'd stayed on schedule, I'd have ended up at the private college my junior year. In retrospect, I totally wish I'd done it. Free college courses, how sweet can it get?! :LOL

Right now, I'm wondering about BeanBean. He used to count regularly and clearly up to twenty, but these days he gets stuck at nine or skips to nine. Like, "one, two, three, four, nine, ten, eleven, nine, ten, eleven, five, six, seven, nine, eight, nine..." I think he just likes saying nine, because if you give him objects to count, he does it right. It's weird, though. Maybe he's just working too hard on the reading/letters to worry about numbers right now.

Tonight in AC Moore, a woman said to BeanBean "You talk really well for such a little guy!" He smiled and said, "I do, and I am a little guy!" :LOL It was adorable. BooBah told someone "I like that" with a sweet BooBah Smile and their jaw hit the floor because they understood her. She was just a total doll! We were at my mother's house yesterday and I watched her climb up some stairs. I asked my mom if she'd ever seen her do that before, and she said that she's been climbing those stairs for at least a month, but she only learned to come back down last week. : It never occurred to her to tell me because she forgot that we don't have any stairs, and she thought that I'd taught her.

I think we're having Tuna Helper for dinner. Isn't that the laziest thing you can imagine? :LOL :

Rynna, Mama to Bean (8), Boobah (6), Bella (4) and Bear (2)
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#137 of 366 Old 02-24-2005, 01:52 PM
 
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Good morning...
I have been spending time trying to educate myself on what it means to be gifted and how it relates directly to my DS # 1. I am finding myself watching him and analyzing everything. :
His latest craze is presidents. His dad got him some flash cards and he is a boy obsessed. He is almost done memorizing their faces and bits of their biographies. His favorites are George Washington and the two Bushes. He seems intrigued that a father AND a son were/are both presidents. He's been sick for the past week so I have kept him out of pre-school.
You may remember my last post...I was venting about the LACK of choices we have in our area, that address the needs of gifted children. Are any of you in my position...chosen not to homeschool, yet do not have adequate resources in any public or private schools in your area? If so, what is working for you? I think what we will do is enroll him into private school and hire a tutor to supplement. Does this sound feasible? What would be the drawbacks? I bought a book the other day and there is a section that has sample letters that can be sent to the powers that be, to ask for increased funding for special needs, particularily for gifted kids. I have not had a chance to read it yet, however the whole lobbying aspect appeals to me. I could really get into that. Anyhow, any suggestions appreciated. I really feel less than confident at this time and I am fearful of screwing up and making the wrong decision.
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#138 of 366 Old 02-25-2005, 11:29 AM
 
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I haven't posted in a while but I do lurke...I love reading about all your children...

just a quick braggy note as no one irl takes this kind of thing well...

Isn't it amazing how those children shock you even though you know...I was printing Sophia's name at the top of one of her art projects and I printed Sop and she said "H" and I nearly passed out and then I said "what's next" she goes "I" and I said and what's next and she said "A" guess she is watching me print her name and has learned the sequence...pretty clever for 19 mos really...hubby went

anyway cheers all
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#139 of 366 Old 02-25-2005, 04:09 PM
 
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Hi Guys,

Sorry I haven't been posting. Life and sickness has taken me over.

The girls are doing well. Goo has started to learn about coins. She loves coins, so we taught her the names of the coins. Someday, we will teach her the value!

She's having incredible sleep issues. It's driving my DH and I nuts. She just doesn't sleep much and she is up at least once every night. We have finally insisted that she doesn't cry when we leave her room (she goes into this scream of "Don't leave I need you" That she only does for DH and I. It's mostly for me even when we spend extra time together) She is doing well with this, now we need to help her go back to sleep or at least stay in her bed when she wakes overnight.
Sigh....

My Moo is scaring me. She is now 8 months old and was looking at a book this morning. She was turnng the pages in the correct direction and instead of chewing on said book she was happily looking at the pictures.
She also doesn't sleep much now down to 1 40 minute nap a day.

These kids are going to kill me!

I have been reading these thread via email updates....Sorry to have fallen off the face of the earth!
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#140 of 366 Old 02-26-2005, 12:36 AM
 
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,
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#141 of 366 Old 02-26-2005, 03:54 AM
 
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Originally Posted by isisjade
Rynna,

I'm delurking here after following these three threads. I wonder if even the highly gifted child needs to be slightly older in terms of being able to understand math concepts. My son is the same age as yours, and although he has been reading for a bit of time now, he doesn't seem to "soak up" math concepts (other than number indentification, which he can do to 100, and not always very accurate counting) the way he does language.
That's just it-- he *does* count well when he has objects in front of him. I know that he knows how to count even when he doesn't; just last night I was talking to Mike about the lack of sex in our lives and BeanBean said, "Lack of six? I got it! Six seven eight nine ten eleven twelve!" :LOL The more I think about it, the more it seems like he just likes the way "nine" sounds.

I don't think he knows the symbols, though; I don't think he can say 5 is five, kwim? I could be wrong, though. And while he knows the alphabet, he only gets about half of the letters right by sight most of the time. He knows "E" very very well, and even "e" but sometimes the G is an H. I think that if I sat with him and did it he could have them all really clear in his mind in less than a week, but I have no desire to do that. He does know what sound all of the letters make, though. It's crazy, about half the time he can't show you which is the H, but he can tell you what sound it makes. He's definately getting there.

Miss BooBah is very sweet and nursable. Today she said several new words, and she's really working on those sounds that you need teeth for (she still hasn't got a tooth). It's really funny, because a lot of times raspberries will replace those sounds. :LOL

Rynna, Mama to Bean (8), Boobah (6), Bella (4) and Bear (2)
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#142 of 366 Old 02-26-2005, 04:44 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Hollis could count accurately at 2 but IIRC did not really start doing math until he was almost three. I do know he read before he was doing math, because I was surprised when he started pulling way ahead in math at age 3 or 4. Since he was so obsessed with the reading for so long, I thought that would be his "thing."
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#143 of 366 Old 02-26-2005, 10:20 PM
 
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Delurking to ask a question since you're talking about math now. What is considered advanced for math? Ds1 will be 4 in three more months. He's been doing some very simple addition/subtraction in his head since early 3s. It's only single digits, like: if 7 trains are at the station and 2 leave, how many are left? He loves numbers. He's just learned to count to 100 (and past). He kept asking me to help him count to 100. When he'd forget the "tens", like what comes after 59 for example, I'd say, "59 is <five fingers>. What comes next? <6 fingers>". He'd think and say, "60!" and then proceed. I heard him asking himself those questions the other night. He was saying, "...77, 78, 79, what comes next? I have 7 and 8 is next so 80!". He doesn't like counting much past 100 because then it involves too many syllables; it feels like a tongue-twister.

Can I ask this? I'm just curious as to how advanced this is considered. It' s funny, because he really seemed to plateau for a while. He always surprised us in the 1s and early 2s. Then, it seemed like he stopped suprising us. I wondered what was going on. Recently, we've seen some jumps again and I'm wondering if this is the beginning of more growth, esp with the numbers.
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#144 of 366 Old 02-26-2005, 10:46 PM
 
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Am I reading this right that you could put her in the one day a week pull out but homeschool her the rest of the time? That would be great.
Yes, there are actually two gifted programs in the district. One is full time. The other is one day a week (the other four days most kids would go to their local school). We are especially interested in the one day pull out because it is a bit more child led than the usual school offerings. Right now, though, DD is really pro-school so we'll have to see what happens by fall.

Quote:
Isn't it amazing how those children shock you even though you know...I was printing Sophia's name at the top of one of her art projects and I printed Sop and she said "H" and I nearly passed out and then I said "what's next" she goes "I" and I said and what's next and she said "A" guess she is watching me print her name and has learned the sequence...pretty clever for 19 mos really...hubby went
I remember we were at Toys R Us before DS was born (so DD was under 2.5) and they asked for our phone number and SHE just said it. :LOL Never occured to me before then, but she had heard me give it enough. It's so odd, though, because I remember her knowing directions to our appartment (we moved out when she was 2.5) and our phone number and addy as soon as we moved to our house and I keep *waiting* for DS to figure it out but they are just so different.



Hmmm, this math conversation is really interesting. DD & DS were both early counters, but while DS definately has the motor skills many associate w/math skill (plus the games ability) DD definately had/has more number sense. We unschool so I really have very little idea *what* she can do and understand but she definately understood counting & counting "by ___" before DS was born (she was 31 months).

Quote:
He doesn't like counting much past 100 because then it involves too many syllables; it feels like a tongue-twister.
DD was the same way. She really LOVED counting by "___" though, because that solved the problem. 2, 3, 5, 10s worked well and she could easily get into the hundreds then. She also liked taking turns counting (I would say the 2, 6, 10, 14 interspaced with her saying the 4, 8, 12, etc...) which we would do in the car and often get in the 4-5hundreds. DS, meanwhile, at over a year older (he is almost 3.5) can count well and understands very very very basic addition/subtraction (esp if he can look at something or use his fingers) but doesn't get skip counting AT ALL. He is happy to take turns counting by ones up til 80 or so but then he is just bored.

Quote:
Can I ask this? I'm just curious as to how advanced this is considered.
I have no idea. I know that DD figured out counting before 2 (could count as long as you would let her). DS, at almost 3.5, gets bored around 80 so I don't really know where he is at. BUT, I do know that to "pass" kinder in our district you have to be able to count to 30 but most kids are beyond that.

 

 

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#145 of 366 Old 02-26-2005, 11:12 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Here's a link for milestones at age 3. Hmm.

http://www.medem.com/MedLB/article_d...DC&sub_cat=105
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#146 of 366 Old 02-26-2005, 11:46 PM
 
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Originally Posted by lckrause
Here's a link for milestones at age 3. Hmm.

http://www.medem.com/MedLB/article_d...DC&sub_cat=105
Is it just me, or do those milestones seem really, really low?
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#147 of 366 Old 02-27-2005, 02:35 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Is it just me, or do those milestones seem really, really low?
Yup, they do seem low. Glad I'm not the only one who thought so.
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#148 of 366 Old 02-27-2005, 04:24 AM
 
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Hello all, just chiming in. I know I haven't posted in awhile, but I have been following the thread (Rynna, by the way, BeanBean's haircut is adorable, he looks sooooo grown up!). Anyway, on the subject of math. I've alway felt Sam has been more "right brained" if you will, creative, strong in language and art as he has never really shown a real interest in numbers. Sure we've always counted things as we went about our day, but I never taught him to count past 20 or so because 1) he never showed any interest in it, and 2) I felt it was silly because it's just rote memorization and I thought it would be better to wait until he understood 1 to 1 correspondence. I never find it that impressive when parents I know talk about how their child can count to 50 or 100 because most of the time it's just rote and they have no real concept of number lines (35 is more than 20, 75 is less than 80). Anyway, within the last couple of months (he'll be 3 at the end of March), he's suddenly taken interest in numbers and has made huge strides in that area. It seemed once he consistently picked up 1 to 1 correspondence, he suddenly grasped other math concepts. Out of the blue he can do simple addition and subtraction in his head and is asking math related questions in our everyday activities. I know it's not really advanced or anything (I know many gifted children are doing much more than this at his age) but it's kind of cool to see him suddenly take and interest in it anyway.

On another note, I have some really great news I'd like to share. I wrote, illustrated and submitted a children's picture book and have been contacted back by some publishers and I am currently in the process of deciding on a publisher to go with so I can go forward with getting the book ready for publication! Anyway, I'm soooooo excited and I just wanted to share!

Jenn :

PS-I also wanted to share the birthday card my sweet little guy made for me today, I posted amongst his artwork (still haven't updated that since last August, BAD mommy) but it made my day. He also brought me "breakfast in bed" this morning, which consisted of awakening me by clonking me on the head with a box of frosted mini wheats, I love him!

http://share.shutterfly.com/osi.jsp?...ZtW7qw&notag=1
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#149 of 366 Old 02-27-2005, 11:45 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Jenn, that's awesome about the book! What is it about, if I may ask.

Cute card, too!
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#150 of 366 Old 02-27-2005, 12:10 PM
 
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I wonder if those of you with older gifted children could answer this..

Our 13-month-old DD continues to show signs of being gifted. Of course, I may be wrong, but let's assume I'm right. If you recognized your child's giftedness at this age, what, if anything, did you do differently? We read constantly, but I have done nothing with numbers and letters at this point. I feel like she would be quite interested in something like letter flashcards, but I don't know if that is going overboard. Can anyone suggest activities that would develop her abilities and challenge her without being the stereotypical pushy parent of a bright child? Or should I let it all be and wait for her to take the lead?

grateful mother to DD, 1/04, and DS, 2/08

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