Support for Parents of Gifted Children, #3 - Mothering Forums

Forum Jump: 
Reply
 
Thread Tools
#1 of 366 Old 01-06-2005, 07:39 PM - Thread Starter
 
oldcrunchymom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: On Mulder's Desk
Posts: 2,569
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Just starting a new thread since several people have asked for one over the past couple weeks. I guess 26 pages is long enough. :LOL

Hope it's okay, eilonwy.
oldcrunchymom is offline  
#2 of 366 Old 01-07-2005, 04:44 PM - Thread Starter
 
oldcrunchymom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: On Mulder's Desk
Posts: 2,569
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)


So, what are your kids up to right now? Hollis (9) is doing algebra, geometry, Latin, Japanese, chemistry, and now is asking me to find him stuff about genetics. He says he wants to be a baseball player and a genetics researcher when he grows up but that he's "not sure how the schedules will work together." Hehehe. Sorry, that cracks me up.

Nan (6) has just recently learned to read. Funny how she went from not being able to sound out "it" to a week later being able to read whole easy readers by herself. Methinks the lass was engaging in some trickery. She stopped drawing Powerpuff Girls incessantly and lately has been trying to copy the dolls out of the American Girls catalog instead. And cats. She keeps drawing cats.

Let's have some brags to get the new thread started.
oldcrunchymom is offline  
#3 of 366 Old 01-08-2005, 01:01 AM
 
Laughingmommy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Posts: 103
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I've recently noticed very different drawing styles between #1 and #2 (at the same age - 2.5). #2 is obsessed with faces, all kinds of faces. She draws 2 circles for eyes, sometimes a nose, a mouth (sometimes with teeth), a big circle for a face. She sometimes goes over her lines once or more. Sometimes she draws dresses or hair or crowns or shoes or whatever. But generally, it's pretty conventional. There's a round face, identifiable features. Standard drawing. #1, at the same age, didn't draw like that at all. She was really abstract. Sometimes she would just draw some weird shapes and call it her. Sometimes she would tell us that what we're seeing are eyelashes (but no eyes), belly button and umbilical cord (but no arms or legs). You know, just really strange representations of herself and others (people and objects).

My concern is that lately we've been watching quite a bit of TV. #1 did not watch so much, and certainly not cartoons. I'm wondering how much of #2's style of drawing is influenced by the images she's received about what a drawing is supposed to look like. I don't have a judgement about it, I just wonder. It would affect how I might proceed with cutting TV out of our lives again. Have you observed similar things? Or just the opposite?

Thanks,
Laughingmommy is offline  
#4 of 366 Old 01-08-2005, 04:57 AM
 
eilonwy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Lost
Posts: 15,410
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by lckrause
Just starting a new thread since several people have asked for one over the past couple weeks. I guess 26 pages is long enough.

Hope it's okay, eilonwy.
It's all good to me! It's just that of my half dozen odd "regular" threads, I've started the most recent threads of 5 of them; I spent a bit of time encouraging others to do it for the new year, and even posted linking instructions for the old threads. :LOL And I haven't started any of the newest threads.

BeanBean is 26 months old now and doing some pretty cool stuff. He's really interested in percentages (I think Mike taught him the % sign), and knows that 100% means something is finished/whole/complete, and that 50% means it's not. He's been playing with words a lot, and tells me all about nouns ("ChibiChibi is a noun, television is a noun, BeanBean is a noun, mamma is a noun, a noun is the name of a person, place, thing, idea!").

He's been drawing a lot with his cousin. She draws people and flowers and houses and trees, and he draws triangles and lines and circles. He doesn't make a scribble and say "this is mamma" but he does scribble a bit and then say "Mamma, I made this for you. See here? It's a triangle! And this is a mess!" :LOL It's adorable, really. He's completely obsessed with triangles. I understand; I was too at his age. He knows circle, square, rectangle, octagon, hexagon and star as well (occasionally squares and rectangles get mixed up) but the triangle holds a special place in his little heart. :LOL

We're still fighting sleep issues (it's 2:40 AM; he went to sleep less than half an hour ago), especially because when he wants to be awake, he tends to make noise and kick his sister. Tonight, we're at the IL's again; he's got lots of very loud toys here. He turned off his Boom Box because "It's too loud for BooBah. She's sleeping. Shhhhhh." So he is trying, and he's learning compassion, sharing, and all sorts of social things. I'm much more impressed by that than any of the "academic" things he does, but all anyone else can talk about is how well he speaks of late. I think it's much more noteworthy that he understands that when someone is scared or upset, they need a hug and that when his sister's asleep she needs quiet. And yesterday, when Mike came home from work, BeanBean wrapped his arms around his neck and said "I missed you, daddy. I love you so much!" He likes to play with names, too; "Mamma loves BooBah. BooBah loves Mamma. BooBah loves Eli. Eli loves Daddy." He'll do this for half an hour, with his cousins' and aunts' and grandparents' names. :LOL

Miss BooBah is 6.5 months old and has been crawling long enough that she fears edges now and will not tumble off the edge of a bed or anything else while she's awake; instead, she'll shriek for attention. Next step: Learning to turn around and slide off legs first. She's actually done it a few times, but I'm not certain that it's deliberate at this point. She's been saying "I love you" a lot, she's blowing fewer raspberries than she was and babbling a lot more, with actual words thrown in for good measure. BooBah calls her brother by name and calls her cousin the same thing every time but it sounds nothing like her name... She also says "mamma," "dadda," "hi," "yeah," and "keeee paaa" (clean pants! :LOL) and is still thrilled beyond reason when people understand her. She's definately gaining weight, and vomiting much less since she started taking Pepcid and eating rice cereal. I'd like to start her on some veggies, but I'm hesitant because veggies can cause gas (even the pureed ones) and I don't want her to associate any more pain with eating. So I'm holding off for a little while longer.

I'm still a little concerned about BooBah "passing" BeanBean, but less than I was now that he's really talking and taking off. He had more actual words than she does, but she communicates more effectively with other people than he did. It's difficult to explain, and I don't know if it's actually her or just that she's a girl and people are more likely to assume that a girl is expressing herself than a boy...? Then again, she wears more boy clothes than girl clothes. I don't know. At any rate, they love each other dearly, and that's a huge step in the right direction as far as I'm concerned.

Rynna, Mama to Bean (8), Boobah (6), Bella (4) and Bear (2)
eilonwy is offline  
#5 of 366 Old 01-08-2005, 11:50 AM
 
LunaMom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: orbiting the earth
Posts: 2,416
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Yup, 26 pages was too long!!!

My daughter is currently in kindergarten and reading what I would call early chapter books - Amber Brown Is Not A Crayon is the one she's reading now. Her decoding skills are pretty good but I've noticed that these days she is just using context clues to figure out words that might stump her if they were shown to her on a list. She gets them immediately, though, without any discernable break in the flow of her reading. It's really weird, because she'll read a word like "Inappropriately" and then miss a much easier, shorter word. She tends to read very fast and skip over small words such as "that," "then," or "and." This is why i like to ask her to read aloud to me a little bit almost every day. Although, even with the careless errors she makes, she can comprehend things just fine - she'll silently read an article about whales in Ranger Rick magazine and tell me all about what she learned with no problem.

I'm starting to wonder if I should start doing math with her. The "math" they do in school is very, very basic so far and I know she is capable of more and would enjoy it. I figure that math is something that requires more direct instruction than reading, because doing paper-and-pencil math is not part of a six-year-old's daily life the way books are (at least in a literate family - sadly I see way too many kids who do not get read to or taken to the library at all. ). Part of me wonders if going out and getting a math workbook is a bad idea - does it make me a "pushy" parent? I just keep thinking of the cheetah in the cage.

And that brings me to the fact that this coming week I will be meeting with her teacher and her "enrichment" teacher to discuss my concern that 99% of the work she does at school is just busywork for her, and that I'm worried that if she is not challenged she will develop the same lax attitude towards schoolwork that I did as a child. That attitude got me into trouble when i applied to and was accepted at a high school for gifted students and suddenly the work was harder and I had no idea how to study. I know she's only in kindergarten and maybe I should sit tight till first grade, but I do want to just bring up my concerns. I feel pressured to do a lot of stuff with her at home to keep her stimulated intellectually and I would like them to maybe pick up some of that - I mean, the kid's in school six hours a day five days a week, and I want her to just have the rest of her time to play! I don't want to make her spend more time doing "school stuff," KWIM? She's six! It might be as simple as asking the teacher to give her harder worksheets for homework. We'll see what happens.

Anyway, sorry if I was long winded - this new thread caught me at a time that my daughter's education is really weighing on my mind. I'm glad to have found this group here!!! I love reading about everyone else's kids!
LunaMom is offline  
#6 of 366 Old 01-08-2005, 12:24 PM - Thread Starter
 
oldcrunchymom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: On Mulder's Desk
Posts: 2,569
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Hey Lunamom, have you thought about doing some basic math with legos or blocks? When Hollis was little he loved making patterns and doing adding and subtracting with his duplos. He would make me "quiz" him for like 2 hours at a time. Gee, I don't know why I was exhausted back then. Anyway, just a suggestion to see if she's interested before you spend money on workbooks (which he also loved).
oldcrunchymom is offline  
#7 of 366 Old 01-08-2005, 03:18 PM
 
teachma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: My new house!
Posts: 4,645
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
darlindeliasmom, unfortunately, a Special Education label such as "learning disabled" requires not only an observable and testable discrepancy in ability vs. achievement, but also that the student is functioning below grade level. Yes, another way in which the schools sometimes shortchange gifted students. So, if you know that your daughter is performing at the same level as the average 4th grader (which is what "at the 4th grade level" translates to) in most areas but not all, the discrepancy between her strong and relatively weak subjects should be enough to indicate a problem, but even her weaknesses put her on par with the average student in her grade, so she is supposedly not struggling in any way that would impact her functioning as a second grader. I know all of this as I have been a 2nd grade public school teacher for 7 years and additionally, I have two siblings who were labeled "gifted" as children. (I happen to have missed the IQ cut off by a couple of points, so I can relate to where you are with your daughter right now!)

I browse in this forum as both an interested educator and the mom of a probably-gifted four year old ds. I also have a 9 month old who's already talking but even more interestingly to me, she has made up a bunch of her own signs (I didn't try to ever teach her any, since i figured ds talked at 6 months and never needed them so she wouldn't either) to communicate everything she needs! Ds's area of giftedness (if, indeed, he is) would be his verbal communication skills, including an extensive vocabulary, and his reasoning ability. He is also incredibly observant, plus he remembers, verbatim, almost everything he hears, including stories word for word after hearning them just one time! And, he remembers them months and months later. He's also just regular "smart" with other things: has learned to read phonetically, can reason out sums and differences, likes to make patterns out of everything.

I enjoy reading the stories others post because I love clever kids and the things they say and do!!
teachma is offline  
#8 of 366 Old 01-08-2005, 07:26 PM
 
LeftField's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Land of well-adjusted weird people
Posts: 2,528
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Hi. I read the last thread with great interest. I'm not sure if I belong here or not. We've been scratching our heads over ds1 since he was about 12 months. Back then, he was really into matching; he would only carry matching toys. He had been flipping through books on his own since 7 months, but I never thought that was unusual.

At 18 months, a lot of things happened at once. He showed us that he knew letters and numbers by sight. I had inadvertently taught him the letters when he took baths. He didn't speak, the ped was concerned, so I tested him with foam tub letters to see if he could actually make the letter sounds (to see if it was hearing or muscle issues or whatnot). I didn't realize that he memorized them. We could take a Hallmark card, flip over to the back and ask him to point out the, "j" and he would. When he got a box of puzzles for Christmas at 19 months, we learned that he had also learned numbers somehow and most of his shapes. He was a puzzle guy for a really long time. He maxed out at 100 piece puzzles at newly 3, where he lost interest (too many pieces; overwhelming it seemed).

Once he started speaking at 22 months, he caught up with speech very quickly. One day, when he was 2 1/2, he excitedly pulled me into the bedroom, saying, "ah uh zoy! ah uh zoy!". We have an inset bedroom ceiling and there, indeed, trapezoid shapes on each side of the inset rectangle. In the 2s, he knew some sight-words. He was also conspicously different with age-mates, mostly in his extreme caution and introversion. He was never one to run around and make happy noises with the other kids. He was happy, but he would rather watch other children play. That really worried me for a long time.

Now that we're in the 3s, he truly seems like the average boy. He's discovering the joys of jumping and climbing, finally. He doesn't really "wow" us anymore. Sometimes, it happens. One night in art class when he was a couple of months past 3, when the teacher said, "turn over the paper and write your child's name", he wrote his name. We had no idea he could form letters! We ended up pulling him from that class, because, among other things, the teacher called him out for writing, saying he had it "easy" for having a nickname with only three letters. He went through a spurt of copying words from books, but he doesn't do that much anymore.

He does love to draw, although he's winding down from that right now (when something catches his interest, he lives and breathes it). His drawings seemed very detailed: trucks inside trucks inside trucks with pictures of trucks on them. He also copied toys for a while, like would draw a toy in front of him, making a decent-looking replica.

He seems to live in a fantasy world a lot, talking to his toys, talking on behalf of his toys in funny voices, describing detailed events that are happening with the toys...I'm assuming that this is a 3yo thing though.

I don't know. We're homeschooling. He'll never be tested, likely. He doesn't seem gifted to me these days. I once sought out this type of thread or board, because of the sadness and difficulty I had with him being so obviously different. This has not been an easy path for us. He's also very sensitive and that's not easy either, especially with a boy. It's nice to have support or talk to other people who have had some of the same issues as us. I guess I feel like I need to justify my interest in this topic. I'm coming from an angle of finding support for the quirks and stuff. But I'm not sure if he really is gifted. Different, yes. Learning to blend a bit, yes.

I also have a 14 month old. We have no idea about him. He spends a lot of time "reading" right now, making very loud animal sounds as he flips the pages and finds animal pictures. He also likes to hum songs, parts of songs I mean. He doesn't have any quirks that show up right now and I'm more relaxed with this child anyway. I have no idea if he is gifted.

At any rate, that's my background. Whether or not my kids are gifted, this subject interests me. I hope it's Ok if I stick around and read.
LeftField is offline  
#9 of 366 Old 01-08-2005, 08:28 PM
 
eilonwy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Lost
Posts: 15,410
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
A conversation with BeanBean:

"Mamma, I want nursies."

"I'd rather not, how about some eggs?"

"I don't want eggs, no thank you. I want nursies."

"How about some cheese?"

"Cheese is yucky, no thank you! I want nursies."

"Would you like some french toast?"

"French toast? That's yucky!! May I please have some nursies?"

"Ask me for anything you like, except for nursies."

"May I please have the other side?" :LOL (Other side meaning, of course, the other breast.)

Rynna, Mama to Bean (8), Boobah (6), Bella (4) and Bear (2)
eilonwy is offline  
#10 of 366 Old 01-08-2005, 09:25 PM
 
Queen of Cups's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: super-crunchy-town, VA
Posts: 2,468
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Hi, ladies! I'm subscribing so I can keep up with everyone!

By way of introduction, I have a 7.5 month old who I'm guessing is quite gifted. He's very expressive, has been signing for "mommy-milk" occasionally since he was 3 months and said his first word this week ("mama"). He figures out toys quickly, follows our directions easily, is already playing with shape sorters and learning how to turn pages in books when we read, and is EXTREMELY social/expressive. He also has an long attention span, I guess since I'm not around other babies I didn't realize that was unusual. He'll happily sit and play with a toy for 20-30 minutes on his own, figuring it out, moving it around, exploring it with hands/mouth. DH and I met at a school for the gifted, so everyone is expecting great things of our kids, which sometimes bothers me, but only because I don't want my kids to feel pressured.

My cute story of the week is that my sister (who lives with us) taught Killy to say, "Blub, blub, blub!" which has no meaning but is apparently really fun to say! We were at the library where she works and she was telling some co-workers how she'd taught him to say it and he heard her telling them and popped up right on que with it - everyone just cracked up! He only says Mama when he's upset and I'm not comforting him fast enough, though - not on que. Honestly, I think he's been saying it for awhile, but I was just chalking it up to my imagination - but my sis and DH heard it this time and convinced me it was real!

Edited to add: Okay, apparently he is saying Mama on que! Just now, DH was playing with him on the floor and said, "If you say "mama" she'll come pick you up right now." And DS immediately said it!

Mama to DS (05/04) and DD (11/05), married to a wonderful DH.
Queen of Cups is offline  
#11 of 366 Old 01-08-2005, 11:00 PM
 
lexbeach's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Northampton, MA
Posts: 5,057
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Hello!

I know this is a support thread, so I hope you guys don't mind my popping in here to ask a question for a friend of mine (who doesn't have a computer, or she'd be asking it herself!). The other day I told my friend that I think her son is gifted, and she agreed that she's been thinking the same thing, but didn't want to say anything since she didn't want to sound like she was bragging. She's actually pretty embarrassed about it. She's also worried because they were just planning to send him to regular public school, and now she thinks that it won't be a good place for him.

Her son, J. turned two at the end of August. He started talking right around 12 months, but unlike most kids who start with a word or two, he was like just suddenly TALKING. In sentences and everything. He repeated everything, but would also come up with his own things to say. We thought this was pretty remarkable, but not entirely out of the ordinary. What first really struck ME about him, was when he was about 18 months old, and after not seeing him for a few months (winter illnesses) we ran into him and his dad in a store. J. immediately remembered my sons' names and who was who (I have twins, and most adults don't remember who's who). I thought, "wow! He really has quite a memory!" And, again, was blown away by hearing such a tiny person speak in such an adult way. Every word is so clearly pronounced, his mom says he's never said a word incorrectly.

Things really started to seem different this past summer. J. and his family moved into a new house that is adjacent to an elementary school. In the school playground, there is a huge map of the US painted on the cement, with all of the states and capitals labeled. J. got a huge kick out of running from state to state and asking where he was standing, and then announcing "I'm in Texas!" or whatever. A couple of weeks after they had started playing at the playground, J. started randomly telling people the names of the states and their capitals. It turned out that he knew them all. Just after he turned two, his parents showed him a blank map of the US just for fun, and realized that he could point to each state by name and say its capital. These are things his parents do not have memorized, so they were totally blown away. Then, one day, J. pointed to a puddle on the ground and said, "that puddle looks like Florida." It did! J's parents realized that he could recognize the outlines of all of the states too. At this point, J. became obsessed with the atlas, and now knows all of the countries by name, location, and shape. I cannot imagine knowing all that stuff myself!

Obviously, this is a gifted child, right? The question J's mom has is if there is anything she should be doing other than just caring for him as she would any two-year-old boy. Also, she wonders if she should have him tested for autism. She only knew of autistic people having this sort of memory. J. doesn't strike me as autistic at all, but I am not an expert. The only thing that I would say seems a little "off" socially is that sometimes he does speak in a kind of a monotone, so very clearly pronouncing each word.

Thanks so much for any replies!

Lex

Mindfully mothering SIX kids (ages 4, 5, 7, 8, 11 & 11) in a small house with a lot of love.
lexbeach is offline  
#12 of 366 Old 01-08-2005, 11:43 PM
 
allgirls's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Canada
Posts: 9,486
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
My little Sophia is 18 mos...and cute as a button...

She is talking quite well...really seems to be having a language burst...nice little sentences..she knows her colors, shapes, most of the alphabet and some numbers. She points to words as we are reading..she is fascinated by words...all pretty cool but not the thing that amazes me the most.

She is absolutely amazing to watch...she will take puppets and stuffed toys and create a whole little imagination world...they will all talk, pretty much different voices...they dance with each other, kiss each other, hug each other...she does the voices...some of the language is real..some is gibberish...usually I can tell if a puppet is upset...she will have a puppet cry then have another puppet console it...it's absolutely unbelievable to watch...she has been doing this since around a year but it's just getting more and more complex as she gets older...

She will also play with her baby doll, fake food and dishes...

I notice she will also make her own decisions...take things on her own to the garbage...then realise she forgot to close the door...go "oh, door" and turn around and go back and close it...geez...can she teach my 14 year old to do this now

Anyway...instinct tells me she's gifted and instinct doesn't usually fail me much...

I love reading about your children...thanks for sharing!
allgirls is offline  
#13 of 366 Old 01-09-2005, 12:33 AM
 
Evergreen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Where all the women are strong
Posts: 5,400
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
lex- I don't really know much about autism, but he sounds gifted to me. Kids are interested in different things. My daughter could care less about numbers, for example, she likes counting but adding and subtracting are not her bag. I hated it too as a kid.

She loves letters and animals, though! She will be two on the 20th and is starting to form words including "MOM" "DYLAN" "CAT" "DOG" "ANDIE" and "FISH".

Which reminds me. We have only showed her capital letters, should we stick with that for a while or introduce lower case as well?

As far as animals goes she knows them all! She will tell you classifications also. Like

"All the primates in the world!"

"What Dylan?"

"I want to know all the primates in the world."

"Okay..."

"People, Gorillas, Monkeys, Orangatans, Chimpanzees, what else, tell me all the primates in the world." :LOL it is very sweet! I jsut wish I knew all the primates in the world so I could teach them to her!

OK subscribing now!

Evergreen- Loving my girls Dylan dust.gifage8, Ava energy.gifage 4 and baby Georgia baby.gif (6/3/11).

Evergreen is offline  
#14 of 366 Old 01-09-2005, 12:34 AM
 
darlindeliasmom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: near Philadelphia
Posts: 1,185
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
thanks, teachma, for your input. The IEP meeting was a lot like knocking my head against the wall, just because you know, as parents, you don't have the language for this. And like a lot of moms here, what I have are anecdotes that sure as hell seem significant indicators that she is creative analytical, comprehends beyond her age...she's also sensitive, resistant to change, and perfectionistic. Not to mention explosive. School has been a little hard for her socially, 'cause she has a hard time budging from her ideas.

Anyway, to get with the program...what dd, 8 is doing now, besides reading reading reading, is completely beating the pants off me in Monopoly and Lord of the Rings Trivial Pursuit. I, it turns out, am truly a miserable Monopoly player. She's off her chess craze, which we were heavy into last year, and is in a knitting phase. And songwriting. I really should get her a taperecorder...because these are just precious. Songs like, "You're not my friend anymore" or "When I grow up, I'm going to be a fairy...unless I'm president" They go on and on. She actually has a great sense of melody, and is trying to teach herself the piano. We are praying for snow, because she has an experiment she wants to do assessing the optimum weight to put on her sled to maximize speed on her fav sledding hill...she's been talking about it since last winter. I hope that we can pull it off and find some meaningful lesson...she wants to present her findings at her school science fair.
This is part of her nature, that she designs experiments on her own and learns stuff about matter, time, energy. It is so unlike my dh and I..I wonder if it comes from her religious watching of the PBS show zoom when she was younger, or if it is just being pulled out of hercsomehow. KWIM? That's what I think gitedness is...these kids just are drawn to learn, and suck up everything in their environment.

Oh, and she will be 8 on Tuesday and her birthday party is tomorrow...send a good thought my way...every b-day has been, um, challenging, but I never learn, and keep having these darn parties. Meltdown #8 on the way!!
darlindeliasmom is offline  
#15 of 366 Old 01-09-2005, 02:11 AM
 
tuffykenwell's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Northern Ontario
Posts: 1,936
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Evergreen
Which reminds me. We have only showed her capital letters, should we stick with that for a while or introduce lower case as well?
I wondered about this as well but DS seems to be figuring it out on his own. He is 32 months now and he can read many words that are in all capitals (his own name, Niamh's name and Canada for some reason LOL!) and he is starting to read other words as well whether they are in capitals or not (ice cream, police, milk etc etc).

For some reason if he can't figure out the word if he spells it out loud then he can figure it out. Like with Canada for example...DH has a shirt that says Canada and he asked what it said and we told him it was Canada and asked him what the letters were so he recited them. Then the next time he saw the word written out he couldn't remember what it was so I asked him to recite the letters and then he knew the word. Is that fairly common when learning to read?

It's hard at this point to figure out when he is actually reading and when he is reciting from memory because he has memorized more than half of his rather large book collection as well as many of the library books we bring home. When he is reciting he gets VERY frustrated when he gets to a page and cannot remember the words that are on it...and approximating the story is not good enough so he freaks out. He has been letting us help a bit but if we "help" too much he will pick up the book and throw it (DH says he has my temper but I think that temper and two year olds go hand in hand right

I am getting a bit frustrated with people expecting him to act older because of his vocabulary. There seems to be this expectation that because he speaks like a child quite a bit older than he actually is that he ought to behave like one as well (ie share well and not "act like a two year old" generally). I keep reminding people (mainly family members) that two year olds do not generally share well and also don't have very good impulse control...so Rhys is completely NORMAL in having those traits!

I often find myself wishing that Rhys fit the mold of a two year old better...honestly being gifted was a pretty mixed bag for me and I really wouldn't have wished it on any of my children if I had the choice. The fact that he is really verbal is helpful because we can discuss things but I don't always handle his need to do everything by himself with as much patience as I should.

I think my biggest worry is that he will be teased and made to feel bad the way that I was in school. I am still on the fence about whether to send him to school at all when the time comes but I have another 2 years before I have to make that decision.

Steph

Steph~~momma to Rhys 2002, Niamh 2004, Isla 2007 and Deirdre 2009
tuffykenwell is offline  
#16 of 366 Old 01-09-2005, 02:33 AM
 
eilonwy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Lost
Posts: 15,410
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
lex, that sounds like a really neat kid! he doesn't sound autistic to me, i've met lots of kids that age with really amazing memories (mostly within my family, but even so-- none of them are autistic at all ).

evergreen-- we showed BeanBean capital and lowercase letters, and when we did the "e, for egg" deal, we used proper nouns for the capitals. "e" is for "egg," "E" is for "Eli." it was really funny, we were out with SIL once when he was about 11 months old, and she pointed to a sign and said "look, it's e for Eli!" and he looked at her funny and said "no, e for egg." I had to explain our little system to her. :LOL

Rynna, Mama to Bean (8), Boobah (6), Bella (4) and Bear (2)
eilonwy is offline  
#17 of 366 Old 01-09-2005, 01:35 PM
 
teachma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: My new house!
Posts: 4,645
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I'm interested that the topic of giftedness so easily leads to that of autism. I am another mom who has wondered about my very intelligent child's possibly being autistic (I was more concerned about Asperger's, which is somewhere on the spectrum). I guess my concerns were not so much about his incredible memory but his fleeting obsessions and also the fact that he is a little bit OC (not really the D, because I don't consider it a disorder, just an idiosyncrasy) and not too social with others his age. My ds also has "trouble" socially, but it's not because the other kids don't accept him. Rather, he doesn't accept THEM- sees himself as different. For example, when he started a threes preschool program a year and a half ago, he observed that the teacher used the word "friends" to address the students as a group. "Friends, we need to clean up now," etc. During the second month of school, ds asked me, with complete honesty and perplexity, "How come she calls us all friends? They aren't all my friends, just two of them are." He had just turned 3 when he made this remark. Well, hmmm...Wereas other 3 year olds might be more accepting of al the classmates as their friends, ds has always been very discriminating. And I can't argue with him- he gives specific reasons as to why each individual isn't his friend! Interestingly, however, ds is completely socially appropriate with older children- our 8 year old girl neighbor, for example- and even more so with grown ups. I think the child on the spectrum wouldn't know how to be socially appropriate with anyone. My ds just chooses not to be with those his own age. Quite a challenge and sometimes hard for me to accept.
teachma is offline  
#18 of 366 Old 01-09-2005, 07:17 PM - Thread Starter
 
oldcrunchymom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: On Mulder's Desk
Posts: 2,569
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Teachma, Hollis has no friends his age either. He has plenty of adult friends and (if necessary) can relate to kids on their level (although this wasn't the case until recently), but he just has no interest in socializing with other kids. Except for his sister, who he gets along with great, and one little boy who lives across from my mom who is as weird as Hollis is. He does have a lot of Asperger's traits, but I've heard that Asperger's kids desperately want friends but can't communicate with other kids effectively... definitely not the same as what Hollis is like. He just loves hanging with adults and older kids who can understand what he's talking about.

Lex -- That kid is gifted but doesn't sound autistic to me since he's communicating so effectively. Hollis did the exact same thing with a giant map of the US at that age. It's so cool reading this thread and seeing where all the kids are and remembering back to when my kids were little.
oldcrunchymom is offline  
#19 of 366 Old 01-09-2005, 11:47 PM
 
Evergreen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Where all the women are strong
Posts: 5,400
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Well, my inlaws are in town...

Today I bought Dylan a sheet of stickers and she was taking them off and sticking them back on. I was explaining 'negative space' to her so that she could match which stickers went into which areas. MIL scoffed, "hmmph, what is negative space?" Dylan ever-so-sweetly tried to explain, "Gramma, it is the same space as the sticker, but the shape of the sticker is on the outside not the inside." as she traced the outline.

Then at dinner, my salt shaker is shaped kind of like an egg, with a flat bottom. Dylan turned it upside down and began singing, "Dreidel, dreidel, dreidel I made you out of clay." We are not Jewish, so I may have spelled that incorrectly, sorry. I am an atheist, in fact so I have no idea where she learned about dreidels, but they must have made an impression on her! Anyway, I thought it was so sweet and dh was also quite impressed.

"Do you see that, she is singing the dreidel song!" I said and noticed MIL's face was blank.

"Drop it, they don't know what that is." my husband said to me.

It hit me then, she knows soemthing two grown adults don't. If she is already having to explain things at not even two what do the next eighteen years hold for her?

Evergreen- Loving my girls Dylan dust.gifage8, Ava energy.gifage 4 and baby Georgia baby.gif (6/3/11).

Evergreen is offline  
#20 of 366 Old 01-10-2005, 05:30 AM
 
eilonwy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Lost
Posts: 15,410
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
My younger niece has Asperger's. She's very bright, has an amazing memory, and is, in general, very high functioning. She has to work harder than other kids to learn some things (it took months of therapy to get her to hold a spoon, and even longer to get her to bring it to her mouth), is very outgoing with other children but doesn't really play with them-- she tends to play "at" them, or near them. She also rarely makes eye contact except by accident, unless you stand really far away from her. Personal space is a mystery to her-- she either wants to be in your face or 10 feet away. After 6 months of intense therapy, followed by 4 months in Early Intervention preschool, my niece was able to understand that people cry when they are sad and smile/laugh when they are happy; it took that much time for her to grasp facial expressions and their link to emotions.

She still doesn't understand body language, and has serious sensory issues. Oh, and there's *no* sense of danger, even now. BeanBean, at 12 months could understand that if something was hot he didn't want to touch it. But because my niece doesn't feel pain, she doesn't understand that if something is hot she shouldn't touch it; she got a third degree burn on her arm touching a hot comb and didn't even notice it enough to whimper.

When she gets upset or overstimulated (which is often) she throws herself into walls or the floor repeatedly, or she spins around in circles and flaps her arms. She rocks back and forth from one foot to the other when she's talking to you. She's been "different" her entire life; she was first referred for therapy when she hadn't started rolling over on her own yet at 6 months. She didn't crawl at all until she'd been in therapy for three months, and then she just took off. She was cruising by her first birthday, and the physical therapist was very pleased, and said "some kids just need to be shown how to do it the first few times." So, she was very far behind, but she caught up in a hurry with therapy.

Recently, I've heard many people ask if their child might be autistic, and they always say something like "He seems mostly normal but he does x and I read somewhere that kids with Asperger's Syndrom are like that." When I remark that their child doesn't seem remotely autistic they say, "but isn't there a spectrum?" Well, yes, there is, and the fact is my niece is at the high end of it. Many people, adults and children alike, have what might be called "autistic tendencies;" I'd go so far as to say that everyone I've ever met has something which could be siezed upon as justification for a diagnosis of Asperger's (or anything else, really). I used to play a game-- write down everything you do for a week, and give me the list along with two hours and a DSM, and I'll find something to diagnose you with. It rarely takes me that long, but it makes a point: everyone can have a label, if they really want it. That won't make it true or accurate, though.

Wow, that sounds a little bit ranty. I don't mean to come across that way, but this is something that's been really getting on my nerves of late. It seems like everywhere I go, someone's thinking their kid is autistic because they heard that kids with Asperger's seem mostly normal. They do-- but they also seem very different. Most of the people I've heard this from need to put down the abnormal psychology books and read "Raising Your Spirited Child" or something along those lines.

Rynna, Mama to Bean (8), Boobah (6), Bella (4) and Bear (2)
eilonwy is offline  
#21 of 366 Old 01-10-2005, 07:21 PM
 
teachma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: My new house!
Posts: 4,645
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Funny little interaction betw. me and ds (4).

DS: Mom, she [baby sis] is going to knock over that bucket of crayons.
Me: Don't worry about it.
DS: Mom, quick, grab it! (as the bucket falls and spills crayons everywhere)
DS: Ughhh (in exasperation). That's just what I was hoping to avoid.

Sometimes, I love how he uses his words and expressions!
teachma is offline  
#22 of 366 Old 01-11-2005, 01:22 AM
 
catgirl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Inner space
Posts: 641
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by eilonwy
Recently, I've heard many people ask if their child might be autistic, and they always say something like "He seems mostly normal but he does x and I read somewhere that kids with Asperger's Syndrom are like that." .........

I'd go so far as to say that everyone I've ever met has something which could be siezed upon as justification for a diagnosis of Asperger's (or anything else, really). I used to play a game-- write down everything you do for a week, and give me the list along with two hours and a DSM, and I'll find something to diagnose you with.

Wow, that sounds a little bit ranty. I don't mean to come across that way, but this is something that's been really getting on my nerves of late. It seems like everywhere I go, someone's thinking their kid is autistic because they heard that kids with Asperger's seem mostly normal. They do-- but they also seem very different. Most of the people I've heard this from need to put down the abnormal psychology books and read "Raising Your Spirited Child" or something along those lines.
Oh gosh, I hear you...I've had it suggested more than once that ds might be "on the spectrum" because he read before he talked (which was late) and wasn't really interested in interacting a whole lot with other kids his age.

I KNOW he's not autistic, but when everyone keeps suggesting it it gets to you after a while. Strange, since we started HSing and he gets to hang out with kids with similar intellectual profiles, he seems a lot more interested in interacting! I wonder why?
catgirl is offline  
#23 of 366 Old 01-11-2005, 09:59 AM
 
eilonwy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Lost
Posts: 15,410
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
i'm seriously debating the merits of teaching beanbean how to read in a few months. on one hand, i know he could handle it; on the other, i don't want to push him too hard. there's more, but the point is, i'm really of two minds at this point.

i don't know why i'm so worried about this now.. maybe because i was his age when i read my first book? hmm. i just need to relax, i guess.

but it leads me to another question-- where do you draw the line between encouragement and pushing? for the past 15 years, i've wished that my mother had encouraged me to do just about anything; she never did, though, for fear of "pushing us too hard." so I never had anything to work for. school work was so easy that it may as well have been handed to me already finished and on a silver platter, and i didn't do much outside of school until junior high. even then, there were no challenges in my academic life.

BeanBean is two now, and I'm starting to feel that he should be encouraged to do something. I suppose the fact that I don't know what means that he's not ready, but I'm not sure. Sometimes he does seem ready. I don't want to fight with him, though. I want it to be fun, I want him to enjoy working things out and using his brain.

I suppose I should wonder what he wants out of life. At two, he doesn't want much; to watch the garbage trucks in the morning, to play with his cousins and grandparents, and to color and trace lines on his maps. He plays letter games and shape games and color games. I think he could probably do a lot more... maybe he's too young to be worrying like this. Is it possible for a two year old to stagnate?

Rynna, Mama to Bean (8), Boobah (6), Bella (4) and Bear (2)
eilonwy is offline  
#24 of 366 Old 01-11-2005, 11:05 AM
 
Heavenly's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 4,923
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
My son also doesn't fit in with other children because he is so bright. They often don't have a clue what he is talking about. Like yesterday at playgroup he was asking a child about their painting and he said, "Did you intend to blend the colours that way? The contrast nicely?" To which the 3 year old responded, "Painting is fun." Elijah kind of got a look on his face like, "Oh brother," and walked away. I was also given a weird look at the craft table when he informed me that he was making a craft for his friend Andrew and asked if Andrew would be impressed with his work. Didn't seem like a particularly advanced comment to me but they were surprised at his use of the word impressed and also his grasp of the concept of other people being impressed with his efforts. I worry about him because of this. I was the same way and I just did not enjoy being around other children. It was almost like I felt they were too simple to waste my time on.

My daughter is sick right now with a really bad cold so she's not doing much other than being miserable. Oh but of course she still has to assert her independence even in the middle of night and even when she is sick. She kept waking up wanting to nurse or wanting water. The one time I had to go to the bathroom quickly and I knew she would want to nurse so I asked DH to get her some water and I'd be right there. I was in the bathroom and heard a big ruckus and I went in and Olivia was standing in the middle of the floor stomping her feet and yelling, "You do not have to hold me, I can drink my water myself, just leave me alone!" Then I came in and she ran over to me crying and said, "Daddy won't leave me alone!" DH was a bit offended but it was actually pretty funny. He was just trying to cuddle her because he felt bad she is so sick and she did NOT want to be coddled. Of course once I was there she dove in bed as sweet as a newborn lamb and said calmly, "I want to nursie."

Have to run she wants to nursie again.

Shawna, married to Michael, mommy to Elijah 1/18/01, Olivia 11/9/02, and Eliana 1/22/06
Heavenly is offline  
#25 of 366 Old 01-11-2005, 12:58 PM
 
Queen of Cups's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: super-crunchy-town, VA
Posts: 2,468
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by eilonwy
but it leads me to another question-- where do you draw the line between encouragement and pushing? for the past 15 years, i've wished that my mother had encouraged me to do just about anything; she never did, though, for fear of "pushing us too hard." so I never had anything to work for. school work was so easy that it may as well have been handed to me already finished and on a silver platter, and i didn't do much outside of school until junior high. even then, there were no challenges in my academic life.
With my parents, and my ILs, there was never really any direct "Pushing" just the open assumption that all grades would be good and they were very actively involved in our school life. It was just expected of me that I would make all A's and I did. It was just expected that I would play an instrument in Band (I'd heard my talk about how fun band was and my mom talked about how beautiful music was), so I did. And it was absolutely expected that I would go to a four-year-residential college, so I did. My teachers were also great - they recruited me to be on academic teams, to get involved in clubs and stuff, and then to apply for scholarships for colleges. My parents were at every single PTA meeting, school play, science fair, band performance (in fact, they were band chaperones for most away events),academic competition, awards ceremony. They never paid us for grades, becuase it was just expected that we would get good one and we didn't need to be bribed, but we would all go out to eat in celebration when we got our report cards every six weeks, and they made a point of telling us they were really pround of us. The one class I ever made a "C" in during high school, I was so devastated and they were just completely supportive and made me feel so much better, because they knew I'd worked really hard (I have a total block on foreign languages and never got above a B in French). You know, thinking about it now, it probably helped a lot that my parents had both been high school teachers in the past.

I don't how much - if any - these things apply to the homeschooling environment. I never did any preschool, my mom stayed home with us when we were little and we didn't do any formal learning before attending school. Just lots and lots of trips to the library, children's museum, nature centers, parks, and other cool places. I actually started Kindergarten at age four and did well academically.

edited to add - I didn't really make it clear in the post, but I loved all of my experiences! I had a great time in school, loved band, colorguard, science team, debate team, church youth group, governor's school, and I'm glad I went to college, even though it was at times very difficult due to some issues I had with perfectionism and an eating disorder. I just wanted to clarify that my parents didn't encourage me to do things I didn't enjoy!

Mama to DS (05/04) and DD (11/05), married to a wonderful DH.
Queen of Cups is offline  
#26 of 366 Old 01-11-2005, 02:46 PM
 
luvmypoonchkie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 106
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Well, the speech evaluator came today for Sam's stuttering and all went really well. He's only considered a mild stutterer and she was reassuring that it is most likely due to his verbal precocity. He enjoyed the testing at first (she was using stickers as a reward) but he got tired of it after about a half an hour (plus he was anxious to play with a tiger flashlight she had used to see inside his mouth earlier). Anyway, he topped off at about midway throught the 5 year old level, but that was due mostly to the fact that he was tired of answering questions. Some of the stuff I knew he knew but he would just point to something without looking or give a silly answer and giggle. The tester was great and she could tell this and that he was done. I was surprised by some of his answers because I initially thought they were wrong, then he explained them and it turned out he was right. In one question there were 3 pictures, one of a bycycle that had fallen over, one of a chair with some books open on it and one of a coloring book with some crayons. The evaluator asked "Sally scraped her knees and elbows, how did she do this?". Sam looked at all the pictures and pointed to the chair and books. I thought he didn't understand, then he said "I guess that chair is much to high for jumping off of.". It makes sense since he doesn't ride a bike and we don't know any big kids who do, so he wouldn't know you could hurt yourself on a bike. Anyway, since he's only considered mild he won't qualify for services but she encouraged me to continue on with the rest of the evaluation (they also have a phychologist and a teacher come see him) because she said it will come in handy when he's school age in regards to gifted programs. Honestly, however, having this evaluation and having some confirmation that he's well advanced is only causing me to lean more towards homeschooling. That's all, just wanted to share with you guys!

J
luvmypoonchkie is offline  
#27 of 366 Old 01-11-2005, 03:30 PM - Thread Starter
 
oldcrunchymom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: On Mulder's Desk
Posts: 2,569
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Rynna, I'm sure what you're doing with BeanBean is fine. If he seems happy and eager to learn then I don't think you need to encourage him on top of what you're already doing.

I understand what you mean, though. We unschool and sometimes I feel like I'm not doing enough with the kids. So if they seem grouchy I'll ask them if they want to do some [structured] learning. Sometimes it's what they need and other times it's not.
oldcrunchymom is offline  
#28 of 366 Old 01-11-2005, 06:03 PM
 
NoHiddenFees's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 2,064
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by eilonwy
i'm seriously debating the merits of teaching beanbean how to read in a few months. on one hand, i know he could handle it; on the other, i don't want to push him too hard. there's more, but the point is, i'm really of two minds at this point.
We chose not to teach DD1 after talking with our (very good) local librarian. She said that in her experience, children start to process language differently after they learn to read and are often less likely/able/willing to soak up the spoken word. She isn't one of those folks who have a blanket objection to all early reading, just the direct teaching of very young children in the earliest stages. DD1 taught herself to read at least two months before she turned three; we don't know how many because she didn't come out of the closet until we reassured her that we would always read to her, no matter what.

We had a couple sets of Bob Books, but DD1 was already reading past that level by the time we got around to using them. Besides, she's a sight reader, even of the Bob books. Now that she's reading, we're working our way through the Ordinary Parent's Guide to Teaching Reading. Strange as it may seem given this choice, I'm not teaching her phonics. We just look at the words and read the passages. One lesson takes about five minutes.

I believe that reading aloud is more important at this age -- even after they can read on their own -- because read-aloud vocabulary is richer and the child will be exposed to more complex sentence structures and stories. Hopefully, they also get the right pronunciation; I've read that gifted readers are more likely than others to mispronouce words because they often read words before they hear them. I've lost count of how many novels we've finished in the past few months. The scary thing is, she has a far better recall of detail than I. I can only push the "mommy-brain" excuse so far, even with the new baby. We used to read each chapter twice (mommy or daddy would have to "catch up"), but that's proven unnecessary.

Quote:
but it leads me to another question-- where do you draw the line between encouragement and pushing?
This is tough. For now, we've chosen exposure and options without any expectation that she do this or that. Instead of encouraging her to try things, we encourage her to keep at it if it gets frustrating. Or take a break an come back later. We also try to model healthy failure whenever possible.

Quote:
school work was so easy that it may as well have been handed to me already finished and on a silver platter, and i didn't do much outside of school until junior high. even then, there were no challenges in my academic life.
I had a similar experience, except that I had a brief shining moment (in the one undergraduate program I did finish -- all others were apparently in anticipation of homeschooling) for which I applied myself and kicked some serious butt. However, I'm thinking that homeschooling will help the girls avoid this. There will be no status quo to live down to, KWIM? No grades. No external validation that becomes the raison d'etre of schooling. I want the girls to grow up feeling good about themselves and their abilities. Sorry, getting off track here.

Quote:
Is it possible for a two year old to stagnate?
Sure it is, but only if there is no opportunity to do anything else. I don't even think giftedness would be much of a factor. IMHO, any child in an enriched environment, with interested parents and plenty of interesting things to stumble across (even just a cool back yard) will not stagnate. If you haven't seen it, I'd highly recommend "Bringing Out the Best" by Saunders and Espeland. It's OOP, but if not in your library doesn't it can still be found remaindered and cheap used copies are available. It's chock full of ideas on how to enrich the environment of young gifted kids without pushing
NoHiddenFees is offline  
#29 of 366 Old 01-11-2005, 07:39 PM
 
teachma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: My new house!
Posts: 4,645
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
My mom and I are both trained teachers of reading, and we are teaching ds to read now...but he is FOUR, not two. While he generally needs a little bit of a push to do anything at all, he has been "ready" to read, in terms of knowing the letters and sounds, for a very long time, and recently, he began saying things like, "I wish I could read it myself" because I am often busy with the baby. So we have started teaching him with a systematic phonics approach which may seem artificial or boring to some, but which he loves. (I say "we" because my mom is my full-time child care provider and she has been doing some of this work with him during the weekdays.) We are teachng him short vowel words in isolation right now (hand, bust, cat, send...) and as well, he has learned the "sh" blend and the "oo" as in Boo! (from a shirt I wore this Halloween, actually). So he can't read books yet, but he can read lots and lots of words, and he loves it! He sees himself as a reader now, which is really exciting to him. My goal is to keep it fun and not to push if he resists.
teachma is offline  
#30 of 366 Old 01-12-2005, 01:41 AM
 
catgirl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Inner space
Posts: 641
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by eilonwy
i'm seriously debating the merits of teaching beanbean how to read in a few months. on one hand, i know he could handle it; on the other, i don't want to push him too hard. there's more, but the point is, i'm really of two minds at this point.

i don't know why i'm so worried about this now.. maybe because i was his age when i read my first book? hmm. i just need to relax, i guess.

but it leads me to another question-- where do you draw the line between encouragement and pushing? for the past 15 years, i've wished that my mother had encouraged me to do just about anything; she never did, though, for fear of "pushing us too hard." so I never had anything to work for. school work was so easy that it may as well have been handed to me already finished and on a silver platter, and i didn't do much outside of school until junior high. even then, there were no challenges in my academic life.

BeanBean is two now, and I'm starting to feel that he should be encouraged to do something. I suppose the fact that I don't know what means that he's not ready, but I'm not sure. Sometimes he does seem ready. I don't want to fight with him, though. I want it to be fun, I want him to enjoy working things out and using his brain.

I suppose I should wonder what he wants out of life. At two, he doesn't want much; to watch the garbage trucks in the morning, to play with his cousins and grandparents, and to color and trace lines on his maps. He plays letter games and shape games and color games. I think he could probably do a lot more... maybe he's too young to be worrying like this. Is it possible for a two year old to stagnate?
Why don't you just try, in a casual kind of way? If he's interested, he'll go for it; if he's not, you can leave it. My ds at 2.5 knew probably 200 sight words but when I casually introduced the idea of each letter having a sound he didn't want to "play", so I just dropped it. 4 months later dh got him "Pooh's Ready to Read" software and apparently he was ready, because he played with it obsessively for 4 days straight (while I was flat on my back with the worst flu I've ever had), by the end of which he had them all down. 6 weeks later he was decoding and reading his books on his own. I guess his brain was just suddenly primed for it at that point. You'll know if BB is ready or not by his reaction.
catgirl is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Drag and Drop File Upload
Drag files here to attach!
Upload Progress: 0
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Mothering Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off