Support for Parents of Gifted Children, #4 - Page 3 - Mothering Forums
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#61 of 284 Old 05-13-2005, 05:34 PM
 
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we used the "poo poo fairy", so every time our son used the toilet he got a small token from the "poo poo fairy". he is 5 now and has been using the toilet for 1.5 years and on occasion will ask for a "poo poo fairy" gift.
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#62 of 284 Old 05-13-2005, 09:02 PM
 
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Hey Lyci, welcome to our thread. My daughter is/was also a fine and gross motor skills girl. When she was very little (don't recall how old but well before 6 months) I had to put away the baby swing because she figured out how to catch the sides of it and make it stop and/or do a bigger swing. She started walking at 8 months and at 10 months I had to put away the high chair because not only could she climb in and out of it by herself, but she could undo the safety belt latch. She could also climb the bunkbed ladder and when she was 18 months I found her on top of the fridge. I feel your pain, LOL.

If it's any consolation she turned out to be a gifted artist... not prodigiously so but definitely ahead of other kids her age. And she's awesome at doing puzzles. I've watched her do new 100 piece puzzles in 5-10 minutes. She turned 7 in March.

For the outlet covers, there are "blank" covers w/o any holes you can buy to put over the ones that you don't use. I don't know about the ones you do use--guess you'll just have to teach him to stay away. Any jars with bad things you can put up high in a locked cupboard (NOT LOW--Nan figured out those babyproof cupboard locks early).

Here are some suggestions for more toys he might like:

Duplos
Bristle blocks
Yarn/cording and wooden spools (for threading)
Those magnet sets you can build "sculptures" with (if he doesn't put stuff in his mouth)
Plastic letters and numbers

I'm sure other people will have more ideas. My kids are bigger now and I can't remember all the stuff they used when they were little.
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#63 of 284 Old 05-14-2005, 07:05 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Lyci, I've got kids who open things, too. I've found that the only thing to do with Bean was to put things up higher, but BooBah is quite the little climber so that doesn't work as well with her. :LOL

I found a really cheap toy that BeanBean loves-- those lacing shapes you can buy at Wal-Mart. He thinks they're fabulous, especially the star and the octagon, for some reason (I think he likes the colors yellow and red, but he likes purple too and the circle doesn't seem to rate as highly...). They're a fun fine-motor skills game for that age set. Other than that... well, if you live in a house, I'd recommend putting a lock very high up on your door.

Foobar-- BooBah doesn't sleep much, either. I've read that some gifted children, particularly highly/profoundly gifted children require less sleep than average kids, but some require a lot more. It actually makes a lot of sense to me-- highly/profoundly gifted kids tend to use more parts of their brain to do things, their brains are actually busier than those of average children. Some kids will require more rest because their brains are firing along at an accelerated rate, but some kids won't because their brains are set up to move *everything* along more quickly.

I do have a theory though, that I've always wondered about. I, personally, have always required very little sleep (except when I'm pregnant-- then all bets are off!) compared to other people my age. I also remember my dreams, and dream in color with other sensory involvment (I can smell and taste in my dreams). I've always wondered if the two weren't related somehow, because I've found that when I sleep more I remember less detail about my dreams. Sounds strange, I know, but I'm very curious about it. Ah, who am I kidding, I'm curious about *everything*. :LOL

BeanBean is much happier playing outside than he is being inside doing workbooks. He only wants to read or do workbooks when it's rainy and gross outside. I'm all in favor of that! :LOL We've been taking a lot of nature walks, he absolutely loves it. I've decided that I'm going to try to read a bedtime story every night, or maybe a few poems (have I mentioned that BeanBean loves poetry?). I don't know if I'll be able to manage it-- it's hard to hold a book and read while you're tandem nursing two acrobats, but I think it'd be a nice thing to do.

Oh! Something amazingly cool happened last week. BeanBean went fishing with his father and grandfather. He had a great time helping reel them in and stuff. Then he saw FIL "dress" the fish. He frowned, looked at Mike and said, "It hurts? It hurts the fish?" Mike explained that yes, it did hurt the fish. He nodded and seemed relieved when the fish stopped moving. Mike's dad tried to tell him that it didn't hurt and Mike said that it did, and he liked the fact that his son had some empathy and didn't want FIL discouraging him. FIL said that he needed not to be empathic if he was going to be a fisherman, but I disagree-- I think it's *more* important that he knows that it's painful for fish to go from being in the stream to being dinner. Mike agreed with me. It's very important that he learn not to be cruel to animals, just because we're going to eat them for dinner. I just thought that was great, that he was able to understand what was going on. I was so impressed with my little man!

Rynna, Mama to Bean (8), Boobah (6), Bella (4) and Bear (2)
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#64 of 284 Old 05-15-2005, 02:00 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Lyci
His fine motor skills are exceptional and that's where we are running into problems. He can open things we didn't think he was capable of (gates, jars, outlet covers-you name it). He is obsessed with wires, cords, and anything electrical.
One great suggestion I read somewhere is that as soon as a child with these interests is old enough, give them real things to take apart. Go to the Goodwill and buy old irons, toasters, phones, mechanical tools and other things with small motors, etc. We've already started a small collection for DD1 this summer... we'll see if she's interested.

DD2 is almost walking (yay!). She's started to take 2 and 3 steps unaided; those chubby legs make her rather reminiscent of the Stay Puff Marshmallow Man. But she is so incredibly cranky. I don't remember DD1 getting like this at physical milestones, though that may be sleep deprivation talking. I haven't noticed anything atypical about DD2, but people are always commenting about her attention span, alertness, her intent gaze, or similar. Maybe there's something there I didn't pick up on. My only real experience with babies has been with DD1, and aside from attention span, I didn't notice anything out of the ordinary about her until after a year.

As far as sleep, DD1 dropped naps completely at 2, but she does sleep well at night and is VERY cranky if she gets less than 10 hours. Usually, she sleeps about 12. She was really pushing bedtime for awhile; singing and telling stories to her friends for a couple hours after lights out. I don't have a problem with this except that she became a bear to live with. About two months ago, we negotiated a later lights out (by 1/2 hour) for her to read to herself on the condition that she not make a peep afterwards. We drew up and signed an official contract and haven't had a problem since.
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#65 of 284 Old 05-15-2005, 04:05 AM
 
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this is my first post on this thread. and i need ur help. does anyone have a reverse hider? my dd is 2.75 years old and i am a single mom with an active daddy. today my dd stunned me by adding and subracting. i have never ever done any of that with her. but she correctly subtracted and added the pieces of cheese my friend gave her at playgroup. then in the evening she got on a friend's tricycle and pedalled as if she has been doing that all her life - when hers is gathering dust which she never wants me to get out. when i told her dad about the incident he said she has been doing this for a long time now.

my dd doesnt like me questioning her - and i have tried what i feel everything. humour, wrong answers, acting i dont know. she has always been a poetry fan and she i guess picked up her alphabets from dr seuss's ABC book. the only way i knew is from her to pointing to shop signs and saying the alphabets at 18 months. yet if i ask her seh will purposely answer wrong or ignore my question. she is in a playbased preschool and i know they do a lot but dont really do numbers and alphabets with her yet. they do the numbers 1-10 but not counting or subtracting.

i usually dont stress on any academics at all. its not important right now. she can easily pick that up when she goes to school. yet she does to pick up things from around her. i do introduce the concepts (do u want to wear ur orange shirt or red shirt - for colour, or at a park restroom 'see that is a blue triangle - daddy can take u in that, mommy can only take u into the circle one, fractions thru pbj sandwich) and she prefers to pick it up that way. she loves books, and only will pay attention about alphabets, words if she asks. if i ask her to say or point she wont.

yet i would really like to learn about what goes on in her head. be the first to know how much she knows. the other day a mom at her preschool came and asked me if i knew she was trying to read. even her teachers dont know that. apparently the mom comes in with her dd and school going son and the dd loves reading the charts (saying aloud each alphabet and trying to sound it out) and my dd joins in and tries to sound out the words along with them. i had no clue she tried that.

honestly these are not the things that make me suspect she is gifted. she has the genes - all her fathers family is gifted. but more the kind of questions she asks. why does the ballon from the store fly away but the ones mommy blows dont. if there are dark clouds where is the rain? her complicated plot of adventure stories of a family of butterflies that we've been talking about since seh was about 18 months old.

does anyone have any suggestions of me finding out what she knows?

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#66 of 284 Old 05-15-2005, 01:41 PM
 
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Not all kids are show offs about their talents. Some quietly assimilate knowledge and only bring it out when they need or want to. I am now going to piss people off with a sweeping generalization. In general, I would say that gifted girls are far more likely to "hide" (or at least not show) what they know than are gifted boys. This seems to be true from what I've read on gifted boards and just from what I've observed in my own two kids. I know my son blabs on and on about the stuff he knows, wanting to share it with people, whereas my daughter sees no use in talking about it if it doesn't have a practical, of-the-moment application.

If you want to encourage your daughter to "show" what she knows, maybe you could get her some workbooks or learning software or other activities such as plastic letters and numbers and see if she enjoys them. If she doesn't, don't push it, but some gifted kids really get into those. It does sound like she's showing what she knows, just not necessarily around you. Maybe she senses your anxiousness to find out. Kids can be contrary that way.

Good luck with your daughter, and welcome to the thread.
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#67 of 284 Old 05-15-2005, 01:46 PM
 
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Welcome meemee.

Quote:
Originally Posted by meemee
my dd doesnt like me questioning her - and i have tried what i feel everything. humour, wrong answers, acting i dont know. she has always been a poetry fan and she i guess picked up her alphabets from dr seuss's ABC book. the only way i knew is from her to pointing to shop signs and saying the alphabets at 18 months. yet if i ask her seh will purposely answer wrong or ignore my question.

[snip]

does anyone have any suggestions of me finding out what she knows?
My advice would be to stop trying completely and just listen and let her lead. It's possible that she feels pressured, especially if there are other family members she's more open with about her abilities. It's amazing the stuff that comes bubbling up incidentally and in imaginative play, like her pointing out the letters in signs.
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#68 of 284 Old 05-15-2005, 08:13 PM
 
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I have also noticed that my DD (16 mo) is resistant to direct questioning about what she knows. I know she knows colors, because she identifies them herself all the time. However, if I happen to ASK her what color something is, the answer is virtually always wrong--and she knows it's wrong, judging by her rather amused expression. Also, we know she can count a little (she will carry two sticks around saying "Two, two" and so on) but after a brief period when she counted objects with me, she is now totally silent when I try counting things and leaving pauses for her. It's often the same with shapes, too--she self-identifies them but does not respond correctly to "What shape is this?" (I do wonder if some of this is not understanding the words "shape" or "color"--think about that! Kind of abstract.)

I take this as evidence that I may be pushing a little more than she wants (it's hard to know where the line is, as she is eager to learn) and have been trying to shut the heck up. But it sounds like you're less pushy than me. Is it possible she has had experiences with peers or adults that might make her want to hide ability?

grateful mother to DD, 1/04, and DS, 2/08

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#69 of 284 Old 05-15-2005, 11:14 PM
 
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Thanks for the ideas for ds and his "machine" obsession. We can't vacuum with him in the house unless we have time for him to spend 1 hour investigating the inner workings of it. My mom found a toy vacuum at a garage sale but ds is more interested in taking the batteries in and out then playing with it. I like the idea about taking things apart, I'll have to find him his own tools though, he would be totally into that.

As far as sleep in concerned, ds has NEVER slept well, not since day 1. (He was really active in utero too). He sleeps for about 4-5 hours at night, the longest stretch, and then is often up 2 to 3 more times, and that's if we are lucky. He is napping better, but I really don't think he needs as much sleep as others. (Or as much as mama!) Yikes.

I noticed something this weekend...ds says different words with dh than with me. He never has said "green" to me but dh told him to put on green boots and he said "green". He has also picked out colors for dh but not for me. He also makes more of an effort to say words more clearly with dh, maybe because dh doesn't understand him as well?

Ok, one last cute thing I told ds it was too windy for sailing today (he loves boats) and ds looked at me and said, "Kite?" So we went kite flying instead.
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#70 of 284 Old 05-16-2005, 03:17 PM
 
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Britishmum is thinking of moving to Mass.
I am just outside of 128, NW of the city.
So am I!!! Do I know you from any of the local lists? - pm me if you like...
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#71 of 284 Old 05-17-2005, 12:05 PM
 
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I just have to share this from Mother's Day.....

Dr. Foo let me sleep in and when I got up Goo had made a card for Moo. I asked her what it said and she told me "It says To Moo, You are my best friend. Love Goo" (insert real names instead of Goo and Moo)

Isn't that great!

Sleep issues continue here. We had a LONG discussion with Goo about how screaming when she wakes at night upsets the whole family. I use my hand to describe how the family works together. I tell her that each person is a finger and when they don't work together nothing can happen.

She has figured it out, so now she comes into our room and tugs at me "mommy I can't sleep!"

Oh well.....


As for direct questioning: Goo will sometimes pull the "I don't know the right answer" trick if you push her. She hates when people do it to her so she plays with them.... She doesn't do it for me, but then again I don't push her on that.
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#72 of 284 Old 05-17-2005, 06:12 PM
 
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Hi, everyone! Its been quite awhile since I popped in on this thread - I'm glad its still going!

DS is almost one year and just constantly amazes me... He's got a decent vocabulary - 8-10 words plus a few more signs. He started walking at 10.5 months, and has now figured out how to pop open the lock on the back screen door. Eek! When he figured that out last week, he crawled out into a rainstorm. I found him happily crawling around on the deck in the rain. I told my mom about it and she sternly said, "You HAVE to start treating him like a gifted child! He can figure things out." She's right... He's been stacking blocks lately and can stack 3-4 before they tip over. He's also suddenly able (willing?) to follow directions, which is so cool - knowing that he totally understands what I'm saying and can act on it. This morning while eating breakfast he kept pointing to pictures on his placemat and waiting for me to tell him the name of each object - its a Sesame St mat with a different object for each letter of the alphabet.

I'm expecting another baby in November, and I'm hoping that DS will adjust well to that. He LOVES other kids and babies, so I hope he'll mostly be excited.

And about sleep - Killy sleeps okay, but not as much as I'd like! About 10 hours a night with a 2-3 hour nap on good days...

Mama to DS (05/04) and DD (11/05), married to a wonderful DH.
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#73 of 284 Old 05-18-2005, 11:31 AM
 
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Hi, everyone! Its been quite awhile since I popped in on this thread - I'm glad its still going!

DS is almost one year and just constantly amazes me... He's got a decent vocabulary - 8-10 words plus a few more signs. He started walking at 10.5 months, and has now figured out how to pop open the lock on the back screen door. Eek! When he figured that out last week, he crawled out into a rainstorm. I found him happily crawling around on the deck in the rain. I told my mom about it and she sternly said, "You HAVE to start treating him like a gifted child! He can figure things out." She's right... He's been stacking blocks lately and can stack 3-4 before they tip over. He's also suddenly able (willing?) to follow directions, which is so cool - knowing that he totally understands what I'm saying and can act on it. This morning while eating breakfast he kept pointing to pictures on his placemat and waiting for me to tell him the name of each object - its a Sesame St mat with a different object for each letter of the alphabet.

I'm expecting another baby in November, and I'm hoping that DS will adjust well to that. He LOVES other kids and babies, so I hope he'll mostly be excited.

And about sleep - Killy sleeps okay, but not as much as I'd like! About 10 hours a night with a 2-3 hour nap on good days...


HI!

I am SO jealous of that nap time!
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#74 of 284 Old 05-18-2005, 08:37 PM
 
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hi everyone,

thank u for ur views. i have thought long and hard about what u all pointed out could be the issue. i finally figured out that those things are not important for my dd so she sees no reason to share them with me. but more importantly she does share v enthusiastically (tada see what i can do, mama did u see that, did u see i could do that) what is important for her. like her physical accomplishments, her discoveries (look mama the rock sinks but the petals float), and blow by blow account of how she took things apart. i realised by questioning her i was turning into the NCLB test - something i totally steer away from.

lisa, my dd hates anything remotely academic. if u show her a book (which she loves reading) and ask her what that word is which she knows she wont answer. she does not read out of books. but the other day we were at famous footwear and she just stood and read their whole slogan (spelt it out) from the wall. she read it and i listened and then she went on her exploring in a v. matter of factly way and i went on to search for shoes without doing a hooplah or even letting her know i heard her.

i guess it is good she shows her talent to someone else. in future if she reveals them to her teacher but comes home and tells me what was important for her in school rather than we learnt abc's today i will be v. v. content.

nohiddenfees - yes u r right. she feels pushed v. easily. u r right about what comes up bubbling in imag. play. my fav. is when i discovered she understood the conept of 'nothing' of zero.

loraxc - her expression - thats just it. that's what clues me into what is serious and when she is being silly. all academic things i've discovered by hearing her conversations with others (real or imaginary) - including colour and shapes.

and thank u everyone for the warm welcome.

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#75 of 284 Old 05-18-2005, 08:44 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lyci
Thanks for the ideas for ds and his "machine" obsession. We can't vacuum with him in the house unless we have time for him to spend 1 hour investigating the inner workings of it. My mom found a toy vacuum at a garage sale but ds is more interested in taking the batteries in and out then playing with it. I like the idea about taking things apart, I'll have to find him his own tools though, he would be totally into that.
lyci i just wanted to add a voice of caution here. my dd enjoys that too. she wants to do everything from scratch, which means opening the screws. so i always look at the screws and make sure she will use the thicker philips screwdriver instead of the real pointy ones as her motor skills are not that good yet. her favs have been so far the telephone, manual typewriter, fan and coffee maker. she knows how to use every electrical gaget in our house. she also loves helping with changing tyres. our play house is home depot. she is right now into plumbing and we got explore all the inards safely at home depot.

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#76 of 284 Old 05-18-2005, 09:25 PM
 
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Originally Posted by loraxc
I have also noticed that my DD (16 mo) is resistant to direct questioning about what she knows. I know she knows colors, because she identifies them herself all the time. However, if I happen to ASK her what color something is, the answer is virtually always wrong--and she knows it's wrong, judging by her rather amused expression. Also, we know she can count a little (she will carry two sticks around saying "Two, two" and so on) but after a brief period when she counted objects with me, she is now totally silent when I try counting things and leaving pauses for her. It's often the same with shapes, too--she self-identifies them but does not respond correctly to "What shape is this?" (I do wonder if some of this is not understanding the words "shape" or "color"--think about that! Kind of abstract.)
I also noticed this with DD 16 mo (on the 19th) and backed off with a lot of things, (including this thread lol) and just trying to let have her have fun and learn about the world! She knows shapes and some colors/letters and will point them out but if I ask her she looks very bored and won't answer. She likes the Starfall website though and particular letters for some reason (mostly those with alligator and bear noises!) and will ask for those letters. I really have not pushed the issue as I felt she was not ready emotionally.

I figure she is so young she will learn these things soon enough and is absorbing an incredible amount of knowledge, and going through such huge changes as it is, so am just letting it evolve naturally. I do think abstract ideas can be hard though I know DD understands concepts like hot and cold, up and down, which surprised me.

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#77 of 284 Old 05-19-2005, 10:34 AM
 
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Destinye--yeah, totally.

I love reading about what other kids are into. Going to Home Depot to check out plumbing! That is cool, and cool that you recognize her interests. It's fascinating to see what they gravitate towards.

I'm curious if your kids followed the "standard" language acquisition patterns (slowly acquiring words till they hit about 50, then a huge language explosion, followed closely by word combining, followed by short sentences). DD hasn't at all. She has hundreds of words which she has acquired very steadily since about 11 months, but until recently just recently used them individually. Now she seems to have sort of skipped the "word combining" stage and gone straight to sentences, though I can't understand them all the time.

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#78 of 284 Old 05-19-2005, 11:03 AM
 
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Wow, I think Moo is showing some signs here too.

She has been having some night waking issues, so a friend suggested that I tell her "no bottles, they are sleeping" at night.

I did this last night at midnight (she wasn't hungry, but wanted one for comfort). I don't want her to rely on food for comfort so I told her "the bottles are sleeping. I am sorry, but we can't wake them until morning" Boy, did she get mad! : She took the paci out of her mouth and flung it across the room. I gave her another and she threw that one too. Then I hugged her and let her know that it was ok, but the bottles were sleeping. She finally accepted that and calmed down. Total awake time, 15 minutes!

Scary how much she understands. Apparently at daycare yesterday, she was playing ball with one of the providers. The woman had to tend to another child, and Moo got mad and threw a ball into the woman's head! Yikes!
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#79 of 284 Old 05-20-2005, 11:17 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I've been having a very long, bad mommy week. I think I'll go nuts if BeanBean asks me one more question or to "ask me a question, mamma!" :

Answering questions-- BeanBean will answer questions correctly under three and only three circumstances: 1) I am perfectly relaxed and ask as if I don't care about the answer, 2) he's "doing school" (which may or may not involve school books) or 3) someone (a stranger) he's initiated a conversation with is willing to keep talking to him. :LOL He's all about asking and answering, right now, though. "Mamma, is this a 't'? I think it's a 't' for Toyota. Is that a 't'? Mamma, ask me a question, talk to me!" When he says "ask me a question," he usually means that he wants me to repeat the question he asked back to him (which is, when I'm in decent mommy mode, the way I try to deal with his questions).

A few weeks ago, BeanBean went up to a woman in a shoestore who had put her car keys down beside her purse. "Hi, do you drive a Ford? Is that a Ford key?" She jumped and looked down and said, "It is, how did you know?" She was just shocked at him. Apparently, despite his recent growth spurt, he's still "small to be talking like that." He was telling her all of the shoe brands and talking about cars with her, and she was all excited, telling the clerk that he could read. Um, not really, just a few words and a heck of a lot of logos (though he does recognize the words when they're not in the logo, i.e. "Ford" and "Toyota"). She was very excited, though, and he was happy so I just watched them chat away. I don't think it hurt him.

BooBahDoo has a few words which are very clear and a few phrases, and a whole bunch of cloudy, quick speech. She walks funny, and she's been doing it long enough now that I'm worried about it. I thought at first that she walked funny because she was new at it, but now that she's proficient I think it's her legs-- she's quite bowlegged. The weird part is that one of her legs seems to be more curved than the other, and she still walks on the outside of that foot occasionally. It's really weird, but she kind of walks with a limp. I wonder if the more-bent leg isn't shorter than the other, and that's giving her the funny gait. I don't really know. Maybe I'm paranoid. I know that if I was to call Early Intervention and tell them that I'm concerned about the way my not-quite-11-month-old walks, they would give me funny looks through the phone. I guess I'll have to wait and see if she's still limping in a few months.

Oh! She talks and crawls in her sleep, and occasionally will stand up and walk in her sleep. Eyes totally shut, and she just jabbers and wiggles away. It's totally nuts! Sometimes she just sits up and just screams at the top of her lungs and there's absolutely nothing I can do with her because she's not awake and not really asleep. She won't even nurse then until I can get her to wake up, and sometimes I can't. I'm horrified to think that she might have night terrors. Mike's sister had horrible problems with night terrors growing up, she'd scream at her brother and shake their bunk beds in the middle of the night, or run outside just shrieking at the top of her lungs and be totally out, not remember any of it in the morning. It got so bad that they actually had her on phenobarbitol for several years. I totally understand what might drive a parent to that point, and BooBah's not even a year old yet. :

Quote:
Originally Posted by loraxc
I'm curious if your kids followed the "standard" language acquisition patterns (slowly acquiring words till they hit about 50, then a huge language explosion, followed closely by word combining, followed by short sentences). DD hasn't at all. She has hundreds of words which she has acquired very steadily since about 11 months, but until recently just recently used them individually. Now she seems to have sort of skipped the "word combining" stage and gone straight to sentences, though I can't understand them all the time.
BeanBean started combining words once he had three of them. After that, new words were almost immediately incorporated into phrases that he already had; i.e. "nurszh now," "I love bananas," instead of just "now" or "bananas." I would say that he collected words slowly in the beginning, but I'm not sure if that's accurate or not. By the time he was 18 months old he talked like a preschooler, and by his second birthday he was just blabbing away. He seems to pick up new words, phrases, and concepts at a phenomenal clip these days, but maybe I've just got a skewed perspective on it all. I don't know, I'm feeling totally out of sync with him this week. :

I'm not sure how many words BooBah has right now, but I don't think it's 50. Maybe I'll make a list and count them later tonight. At any rate, she seems to pick them up much more slowly, but once she has them she uses them constantly. She doesn't say anything she doesn't mean, it's like every word that comes out of her mouth has got to be important or she doesn't want to bother with it. :LOL I'm ashamed to say that she doesn't have a set of blocks, so I have no idea whether or not she can stack them. : I do know that she's figured out how to remove individual bits of a pinecone, and that she prefers eating dandelion greens to the regular grass growing in the yard and can differentiate well enough to pick them on her own. She's super cute and lovey, though.

I've learned something else about BooBah: if I make sure she has a *big* meal about 1/2 hour before bed, she sleeps a heck of a lot better. That, and if I don't try to keep her under a blanket. It's amazing, BeanBean and BooBah sleep in exactly the same positions or in mirror images of one another every night, but BeanBean refuses to sleep without a blanket no matter how hot he is, and BooBah refuses to sleep under a blanket unless she's *freezing* (and she rarely is-- she's daddy's girl). The one time I can remember her climbing back under the blanket, she was so cold that she shocked me awake. :LOL She still talks or sits up and screams in her sleep, but she doesn't actually wake up to nurse if she's not under something.

Rynna, Mama to Bean (8), Boobah (6), Bella (4) and Bear (2)
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Oh! She talks and crawls in her sleep, and occasionally will stand up and walk in her sleep. Eyes totally shut, and she just jabbers and wiggles away. It's totally nuts! Sometimes she just sits up and just screams at the top of her lungs and there's absolutely nothing I can do with her because she's not awake and not really asleep. She won't even nurse then until I can get her to wake up, and sometimes I can't.
Quote:
Originally Posted by eilonwy
and BooBah refuses to sleep under a blanket unless she's *freezing* (and she rarely is-- she's daddy's girl). The one time I can remember her climbing back under the blanket, she was so cold that she shocked me awake. :LOL She still talks or sits up and screams in her sleep, but she doesn't actually wake up to nurse if she's not under something.
Wow, you could be describing DS. DH says he got my nightmares, because occasionally he'll wake up HYSTERICAL and its almost impossible to wake him up. He also refuses to sleep under a blanket - even when DH and I are freezing and under the covers, he has to sleep on top of them between us. My sister and I occasionally had the "heebie-jeebies" when we were little - especially when we were sick. We'd wake up completely disoriented and hysterical and stay that way for awhile - it was basically hallucinations, or maybe more accurately being technically awake, but still stuck in a bad dream. (It still happens to me, though very occasionally.)

And about language aquisition, DS is so strange... He'll pick up a word and use it constantly for about a week, but then sometimes not use it for a couple weeks and then reincorporate it in to everyday speech. "Mama" was his first word (at about 7 months), and he used it constantly until he learned "Dada" a few weeks later and has only recently started using Mama regularly again - it was a last-resort-I'm-really-really-really-upset word for a long time. Thinking about it, DS's vocab right now is: mama, dada, duck, hi, banana, nana (nursing), auntie, thank you, done (as in "all done"), Bert (from his Sesame Street placemat), and he tries to say grandpa but that seems to be a tough word for him. No word combining yet, unless you count "Hi, dada!" Well, DH and I also think he says, "I love you" but he says it so quickly that we're not positive.

Mama to DS (05/04) and DD (11/05), married to a wonderful DH.
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#81 of 284 Old 05-21-2005, 01:36 PM
 
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If anyone has a child in a "Gifted/Highly Capable/Whatever you want to call it" school I'd really appreciate some input on this thread:
http://www.mothering.com/discussions...d.php?t=290045

I am having such a hard time deciding. The test results came back and DD has a place in the Full-Time Highly Capable Program in the 2nd grade. We're not sure if we want to take it, put her in just one day a week in the supplimental program (we homeschool), see if we can put her in the 1st grade instead (she turned 6 in January)--- which they are resistant to based on her test scores: she qualified for 2nd grade and "they" think she should at least start there.

Have I mentioned that I HAVE NO IDEA WHAT TO DO?!?!?

Thanks

 

 

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#82 of 284 Old 05-21-2005, 08:28 PM
 
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Just my opinion, but I would do the one day a week thing if possible. I guess it depends on your reasons for homeschooling. Even if I had access to the best gifted school in the whole world, I wouldn't send my kids there full time, because of our other reasons for homeschooling. But if your reasons for homeschooling are mainly academic, the gifted school might be a good choice, assuming it fits your child well.

I don't see the big deal about her being in second grade at 6... lots of kids started it at 6 (and turned 7 during the fall/winter) when I went to school. I'm sure she could handle it academically. Does she have any social issues that make you think grade 2 would be a bad fit?
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#83 of 284 Old 05-21-2005, 08:35 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lckrause
I don't see the big deal about her being in second grade at 6... lots of kids started it at 6 (and turned 7 during the fall/winter) when I went to school. I'm sure she could handle it academically. Does she have any social issues that make you think grade 2 would be a bad fit?
The first year it wouldn't be a big deal at all. She would be in the 1st/2nd grade split so right in the middle of the age range. The next year could be a bigger issue (with her being 7 in a group of 8-10 year olds).

 

 

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#84 of 284 Old 05-22-2005, 10:19 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Britishmum
Dd - Hmmmmm. But did God even invent George Bush?

Me (stifling giggles) - Well, yes, because God created everything.

dd - But why did he invent George Bush?

:LOL :LOL :LOL
: That's hilarious!! : I ask myself the same question....

Tired-- I was a young student, and quite frankly it wasn't a big deal. The only time I can remember being upset about it was in Kindergarten; the teacher made a big deal about birthdays and I noticed right away that the kids were all turning six before I turned five. The next youngest child in my class turned six three weeks before my fifth birthday, and in my little head three weeks was *forever*. I came home and demanded that my mother change my birthday. :LOL I said, "the last kid in my class who was five turned six on Saturday, and I'm still not five. You have to fix that!" She just kept saying over and over again that I'd turn five soon, but I just had to wait it couldn't be helped. I was irritated, but the people we were staying with made a great party for me on my birthday and I felt a heck of a lot better about it all. :LOL

I had a friend in school who's birthday wasn't until March because she skipped kindergarten. She's in veterinary school right now, I think, because she changed her mind about what she wanted to do (she's got a masters in neural chemistry). It's all good. The fact is, as you get older the age difference means less and less, until you get to college and there are kids who are younger than you are and adults who've got grown children and are going back to school and you realize that you only thought the age thing was important in elementary school because the teachers and your parents made a big fuss about it.

As far as socialization goes, I personally had huge issues with it but that had much more to do with my personality than my age. In fact, in retrospect I think that if I'd been in a class of even older children, I'd have had an easier time of it. Looking at the research, I was a prime candidate for grade skipping. I think I'd have been much more comfortable in a class of fourth graders at 4.5 than I was with the older kindergarten class. But I digress.

I'm with lckrause: it really depends on your reasons for homeschooling. If I could afford it and my kids got a place at a "gifted" school, I'd probably consider it, especially for BeanBean. He's an almost overbearingly social child. While I don't see school as the ideal social environment, for him any opportunity to meet more people is and will be a great thing. I'd probably put him in for three days a week initially and take it from there. My reasons for homeschooling are varied, but having challenging work is one of the big ones. If there's a school that can provide that and be a social outlet for BeanBean, I'm all in favor of it.

Rynna, Mama to Bean (8), Boobah (6), Bella (4) and Bear (2)
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#85 of 284 Old 05-22-2005, 12:15 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Britishmum
dd - But why did he invent George Bush?
:LOL Why indeed?

Last summer DD1 made an animal parade of all her HABA figures. Along one side she set up a row of trees and shrubs. A guest asked her what kinds of trees they were and she answered, using her sweetest voice, "A peach tree, and apple tree, [a couple more things], and that jackass bush. I was very pregnant at the time and actually hurt myself laughing.
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#86 of 284 Old 05-22-2005, 02:19 PM
 
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Socially I think there are ages when it's not a big deal, but when you hit puberty, I think it is much more of an issue. JMO, but it's not something I would do, especially if you have a good thing going at home anyway.
I am assuming that my kids won't be in traditional school during/after puberty. This would be simply a 2nd-5th or 6th grade thing for us.

Quote:
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Tired-- I was a young student, and quite frankly it wasn't a big deal. The only time I can remember being upset about it was in Kindergarten; the teacher made a big deal about birthdays and I noticed right away that the kids were all turning six before I turned five. The next youngest child in my class turned six three weeks before my fifth birthday, and in my little head three weeks was *forever*. I came home and demanded that my mother change my birthday.
Do you mean that you were put in kinder as an early 4? So all the other kids turned six before you turned 5? Thats funny because I have gotten a lot of comments about "Is DS going to kinder next year?" because he is right about that level (though not that size!!!). But his b-day is Aug 31st, so he will actually turn 4 the week school starts. I would definately not put him in traditional school, but DD goes to a supplimental homeschool program (where she takes many of her classes) and he could go if I tested him in. But, I think we're going to go ahead and wait until he is a very young 5 instead. I my time with just DS while DD is in her class!

 

 

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#87 of 284 Old 05-22-2005, 02:45 PM
 
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Oh, I just wanted to add:

Quote:
Originally Posted by eilonwy
If I could afford it and my kids got a place at a "gifted" school, I'd probably consider it, especially for BeanBean.
It is actually a program through the public schools. It is a fairly large school district (24-25 schools averaging 4-600 students per school) and they simply have small magnet schools. If I had the $ I would be drawn more toward a Democratic/Child-Led school.

 

 

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#88 of 284 Old 05-22-2005, 07:42 PM
 
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I started kindergarten when I was 4 and didn't turn 5 until the middle of November. It never bothered me at all until my junior year of high school - all my friends had their driver's licence before I was old enough to get my learner's permit. That was a huge bummer! But I never had any socialization problems or anything.

I had wonderful experiences in the public school gifted programs. I was in pull-out programs (met once a week or once a month, being pulled from regular class into a gifted class) from third grade through 7th grade, nothing much in 8th-9th grade, summer after 10th grade I went to a specialized camp for gifted kids, and 11th-12th grade did a half-day specialized school that pulled gifted students from all the surrounding schools. DH also had wonderful experiences in public school in the gifted program - we actually met at the specialized high school.

Mama to DS (05/04) and DD (11/05), married to a wonderful DH.
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#89 of 284 Old 05-23-2005, 11:20 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Quote:
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:LOL Why indeed?

Last summer DD1 made an animal parade of all her HABA figures. Along one side she set up a row of trees and shrubs. A guest asked her what kinds of trees they were and she answered, using her sweetest voice, "A peach tree, and apple tree, [a couple more things], and that jackass bush. I was very pregnant at the time and actually hurt myself laughing.
: We had to work so hard to watch our mouths around BeanBean, because the ILs are hyperconservatives. As it is, he saw Bush on TV once down there and said, "it's that moron, mamma!" Luckily MIL was in the kitchen and FIL was taking a nap. :LOL

Tired-- I was a late four when I started kindergarten. There was a morning class for the "younger" kids and an afternoon class for the "older" kids (the idea being that younger kids might still need a nap in the afternoon). The district I was in had a cut off date of September 30th, which meant that my brother made the cut but I didn't. We'd have been in the same class, and my mother didn't want that so she had me tested. There were about a dozen other kids tested that year; four of them "passed" and were put into the younger kindergarten with the other five year olds. I was put into the older kindergarten, with all the kids who hadn't made the cut off date the previous year and whose parents had held them back for whatever reason. Most of them turned six in September, one or two were six at the beginning of the year. I turned five in October. My mother tells me that they wanted to put me in first grade, but she wouldn't allow it.

In second grade, I started attending a teensy weensy little private school where I pretty much had my own curriculum. I was given a sixth grade spelling book, no reading book at all (because I knew how to read), a fourth grade math book and, after one month of playing catch-up, my own fifth grade Hebrew class. Over the following summer, my mom tutored a high school kid in algebra and my brother and I learned it along with him. I had a few really good years in terms of education, but I remember a lot of wasted time waiting for kids to catch up. Despite the fact that there were never more than three kids in my grade and eleven in my class, I did an awful lot of waiting. : The wasted time is something else that really ticks me off about school. I don't think that most parents realize how little time in school is actually spent doing school work, especially for a child who can finish "an hour" of work in two or three minutes. I can remember just wandering around the classroom for hours on end, looking out the window because I'd finished my book and hadn't had room in my backpack for another. It was around the end of third grade that I decided that longer books were the way to go, and that Star Trek novels simply weren't long enough; I started reading anthologies. :LOL Boy, did I get some funny looks for that.

I definately hope to avoid wasting so much time with my own kids. I've heard people say that if I was really so smart, I'd have found something to do in school. They don't really get it; I did everything that there was to be done, and didn't want to play games-- I wanted, needed to learn something new and there just wasn't anything for me to do. I was in the oldest class in my school, so I couldn't wander down the hall to find some older kids. I'd already gone above and beyond what they had to offer me. I never want my kids to feel like they ought to be learning something but they don't have the opportunity to do so. If they finish everything I can throw at them, I will *find* something else for them to do. I'm not sure what I'll do if they don't prove to have the same voracious appetites for the written word that I do, but I'll think of something. Where there's a will, there's a way, and boy have I ever got the will!

It's very cool that your public school system has a special place for gifted kids. When I got back into public school for seventh grade, I was put into the top class, and given all kinds of extras but they weren't really enough. For example: the class I was in took pre-algebra in seventh grade. Three other girls were in an algebra I class with me. It was all well and good, but I got a B in that class despite the fact that I only turned in homework once every other week or so. I loved the teacher, she was great, but the work just moved too slowly, and the class consisted entirely of material that I'd covered when I was 7, in the summer before third grade. I was bored and remained bored throughout the year. I joined the chess club, and participated in OM and PJAS and Speech & Debate, and I was still bored. I spent a lot of time reading novels in class, and I was late for school more often than not. I just didn't want to be bothered. The whole thing felt like a waste of time. I'd have been happier in the library for those eight hours every day, and I'd probably have learned more.

I gave up doing homework entirely in eighth grade, doing only assignments which I found interesting. In general, these involved research which was (still is) one of my favorite things to do. I wrote my quasicrystal paper in eighth grade, and several essays for civics class. I missed a lot of school being sick and participating in "extra" activities-- that year I won several awards for "school projects" despite spending more time out of classes than in. I had a lot of fun that year, but that just reinforced the lesson that school is a waste of time-- all of the good stuff happened outside of class. My teachers didn't know what to do with me, and I must have heard the "you have so much potential..." speech a hundred times that year. My English teacher told me that she was hurt by my refusal to do her assignments (I managed not to laugh until I was out of earshot, but it was difficult), my math teacher was oblivious and gave me a B because "she's always so quiet during class and she does well on her tests," and my science teacher (who was also my homeroom teacher) just didn't get me at all. I'd ask questions in class that would make his hair stand on end, and help other students to get A's and then turn around and not hand in assignments. "They're so easy for you, why can't you turn them in?" But I really couldn't-- how could I possibly focus on the differences between different kinds of rocks when there were much more interesting things going on just a few blocks away in books at the library? I mean, the rocks were interesting for a little while, but I finished reading the textbook about two weeks into the school year and after that I just didn't want to be bothered filling in the blanks on stupid homework assignments.

Recently, I've learned that this phenomenon has actually been documented; far from being alone in this, I was just like hundreds if not thousands of other kids of similar ability all over the country. I was so relieved when I read about it, because it proved to me that I was right all along. I didn't fail schools, they failed me. I can do better for my own kids, by making sure that they've got something interesting to do. They don't have to wait until they're 15 to get to an interesting class with new subject material-- *everything* can be new before then. They'll be busy when they need to be busy, and be left alone when they don't. I'm dead set on making things better for them, so they won't go to school; instead, they'll stay home and get educations.

Rynna, Mama to Bean (8), Boobah (6), Bella (4) and Bear (2)
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#90 of 284 Old 05-23-2005, 08:30 PM
 
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I was young for my grade, though not by too, too much; I have a November birthday and started K at 4. I actually do feel that it was a handicap at certain points: puberty (I also hit it late, at about 13/14) and at the time everyone else got their drivers' licenses. The puberty part was much worse; I was still interested in my elaborate unicorn fantasies and everyone else was obsessed with boys. But I suppose that could happen no matter what.

I see how grade-skipping can be quite helpful to the profoundly gifted. I'm not sure how I feel about it when it comes to mildly to moderately gifted kids (which is what I was). I can't say yet where DD falls; I'd guess she's somewhere in that range, right now. I think she is lopsidedly gifted, like me. Her aptitude for puzzles and things of that type seems very average. But she is light years ahead verbally, and her memory, attention span, and...mental acquisitiveness, I'd guess I'd call it, continue to amaze me.

grateful mother to DD, 1/04, and DS, 2/08

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