Support for Parents of Gifted Children, #4 - Page 5 - Mothering Forums

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#121 of 284 Old 06-13-2005, 03:47 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pioneermama
I think our daughter may be advanced and I'm trying to get a baseline. We've always noted that she seemed to do certain things early, but now we are really begining to wonder...

Dd will be four in Sept.

So, what's typical for this age and what is beyond?
It sounds to me like she's ahead of the curve!

Check out this website. A friend sent this to me and it has proven to be very useful:
http://www.hoagiesgifted.org/

Click on "Parents" to start with

7yo: "Mom,I know which man is on a quarter and which on is on a nickel. They both have ponytails, but one man has a collar and the other man is naked. The naked man was our first president."
 
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#122 of 284 Old 06-13-2005, 04:06 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Lisa-- Don't feel guilty, just remember where not following your instincts leads you. Easy for me to say, I'm wracked with guilt over every little thing; still, I've learned that it's not constructive. I'm working on it. :LOL


Quote:
Originally Posted by loraxc
*sigh* Yeah, I hear this. I do. I guess I'm thinking, though, that at the early primary levels, a lot of school is about social skills and play. No? And I do think those are very important. I mean, she may know the alphabet backwards and forwards, but she's no better at sharing than any other kid her age. Isn't all that other stuff more of an emphasis, really, than the letter of the week? And how much does it really matter, early on?
You do learn social skills in school, they're just not necessarily skills that serve well in real life, or skills that you want your child to have. When ChibiChibi (now 8) was in public school, in kindergarten, she learned some fascinating things. She learned that a white boy will always be the smart kid in class, even if a black girl can run rings around him. She learned that when little boys beat up on a little girl, it's in her best interests to keep her mouth shut because noone will believe the little girl anyway. She learned that if she expresses any dissatisfaction with anything, she will be subject to punishment from her teachers. I could go on and on in this vein, but I think I've made my point.

Think of it this way: after you graduated from high school, you were expected to interact with people to a certain extent. How often were you put into a room full of people who were all within about 12 months of your own age and told to interact with them, exclusively? How often are you put into a room with people and told to pick and choose only the people your own age to interact with, and shunned if you tried to go outside of that range? It never happens, outside of school. Even in college, you often have students who are entering early at 16 in the same classes as adults who've just gotten out of the military at 27, or middle aged housewives whose own children have grown and now they want to get their degrees. After high school, most people breathe a sigh of relief that they'll never have to deal with the patently absurd and artificial socialization that school forced on them.

As to your daughter-- it really depends on her and her personality, but it sounds to me like she'll be bored from kindergarten on. Some kids aren't bored until later, but I most assuredly was and I know it's possible. A child who has been reading for a year (or two or three) before they start kindergarten will naturally have a hard time sitting still to sing the alphabet song and color blue circles and yellow triangles for hours on end. Yes, early elementary curricula tend to focus more on academics than they once did, but that doesn't make it any more interesting for a child who's already learned everything that they'll be shown over the year.

Sometimes I feel like I'm in the opposite situation with BeanBean. By the time I was his age, I was reading well and often. My handwriting sucked, but it was legible enough to pass for a first grader's, and I was in my own league mathematically. By 2.5, I was not interested in playing as much as conducting experiments. BeanBean loves to play, to crash his cars into things, to do normal, healthy, 2.5 year old things. He's not like other 2.5's in many ways, but he is in so many others. I wonder if it would do him a disservice to keep him home because he's so normal in so many ways, maybe he wouldn't be bored in kindergarten at all. Then I remember that I have other reasons for homeschooling, namely that I want my kids to have healthy skills when it comes to interacting with other people. I never want my children to feel like there's something wrong with them if they want to play with a child who is younger or older than they are, you know? It's a useful skill to have in the real world and that is, eventually, where I want my kids to be comfortable.

Rynna, Mama to Bean (8), Boobah (6), Bella (4) and Bear (2)
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#123 of 284 Old 06-13-2005, 08:07 PM
 
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But I do think it's possible to learn some key social skills/lessons in school. Are there times when it all goes totally sideways? Absolutely. But I also worry about the social/emotional ramifications of keeping so much of life within the family (if we homeschooled). This isn't really a debate for here, of course--homeschool vs. regular school...I see positives and negatives of both, but mostly, again, I don't see HSing being something *I* can do, and it's such a huge commitment that I really do not want to do it with mixed feelings or dragging feet. You know?

Maybe I'll be singing a different tune when she's actually in school. I certainly wouldn't guarantee you that I won't be.

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I wonder if it would do him a disservice to keep him home because he's so normal in so many ways, maybe he wouldn't be bored in kindergarten at all.
My dd is extremely outgoing and social. She loves new people and places, and I do think the stimulation of a school environment would be enjoyable to her--at least initially.

grateful mother to DD, 1/04, and DS, 2/08

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#124 of 284 Old 06-13-2005, 08:44 PM
 
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When we were considering putting DD in school for kindergarten we talked to several people (teachers, adminsitrators, gifted program coordinator, etc...) and they generally agreed that kindergarten is in many ways the *hardest* to deal w/gifted children. Especially those that have early academic skills. By 1st, 2nd, 3rd grade most of the kids can read so the teachers "can" just have different kids working independently on different levels. But at kinder when so many of the kids are non-readers (and in some school districts 1st or even 2nd) they really expect the kids to all work at one level so they don't loose anyone.

For that and many other reasons we have homeschooled DD until now. Next year we will be trying out a full time gifted school with her one grade up to see how that will work out (I'm expecting to put her back with her age mates, but the coordinator is insistent that that is where she belongs ). I have encouraged many people to instead of putting their child ahead in kinder, skip kinder and just start in 1st: IF THAT SEEMS LIKE A GOOD FIT FOR THEIR CHILD.

I have *no* idea what we will do with DS. His birthday is August 31 and the school cut-off is August 31 (though most people we know think he is a year older, just very short and assumed he was going to kinder next year when he will have just turned 4). BUT, this district tends to encourage boys to hold back a year, all the way up til MAY!?!?!? I told DP that we can get DD settled and then if that school works out we can start out stressing over DS. :LOL

 

 

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#125 of 284 Old 06-13-2005, 10:30 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by loraxc
But I do think it's possible to learn some key social skills/lessons in school. Are there times when it all goes totally sideways? Absolutely. But I also worry about the social/emotional ramifications of keeping so much of life within the family (if we homeschooled). This isn't really a debate for here, of course--homeschool vs. regular school...I see positives and negatives of both, but mostly, again, I don't see HSing being something *I* can do, and it's such a huge commitment that I really do not want to do it with mixed feelings or dragging feet. You know?
I'm sorry, my point wasn't to start a debate, only that I think that the "socialization" that goes on in school leaves an awful lot to be desired, even compared to the least socially active homeschooling environments. In my (admittedly brief) experience, social activities for homeschoolers are much easier to come by than I once imagined. My niece (a very extroverted child, to put it mildly) has spent nearly as much time with other children this year as she did while she was in school, and she enjoyed all of it a great deal; all without the drawbacks of school's strict social environment. It's just the way I see things. Of course, my thoughts on this subject are colored by my own horrific experiences in school. :LOL Maybe it's just easier for me to see the bad...?

In fun news: BeanBean read the words "not available" yesterday. I haven't got a clue as to where that came from. :LOL It came up while I was trying to put up the subtitles on a DVD; I hit the wrong button and got a feature that was "not available," and BeanBean read it to me. I was seriously shocked. :LOL I'm also vaguely horrified-- though he knows that letters make sounds, he seems to be a whole-word reader for the most part. I have no idea what to make of this, but Mike thinks it's very cool (since he taught himself to read the same way). We may have to do some formal phonics instruction later on, or maybe he's just absorbed a heck of a lot more than I thought. We'll see!

Rynna, Mama to Bean (8), Boobah (6), Bella (4) and Bear (2)
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#126 of 284 Old 06-14-2005, 02:24 AM
 
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I can't say that I look fondly back on my social experiences in school, or for that matter, any experiences in school... maybe the earliest years when I was learning to play the game. At least I was learning something. : I do have one friend still from high school... but since she's not in my year I realized I didn't want to go to my 15th or my upcoming 20th reunions because there's not a single person I want to see. For me school was all about avoidance: avoiding all but a very few people, avoiding classes. I didn't have to actively avoid work because it was all too easy, even though I took twice the number of college prep classes needed. (We had 5 years of high school, Grade 13 being a college prep year, with six credits required).

Quote:
Originally Posted by eilonwy
In my (admittedly brief) experience, social activities for homeschoolers are much easier to come by than I once imagined.
I hear you. DD1 is preschool age, but already we're hanging around other homeschoolers and she typically has at least two playdates a week with them, in addition to our other activities. We're planning (loosely, given the time frame) to combine forces for certain subjects, hire native language tutors for the group, evaluate and share curricula, etc. DD1 will be ahead in math and reading, but I still feel she'll gain from some group actiivites. And this is just neighborhood people. there's a huge network of homeschoolers where we live: Park days, field trips, homeschool classes, reading groups, game days, you name it. I'm suspecting that the girls will have more actual social interaction during "school hours" than their peers in school. Besides, school gets out not long after 3 and that leaves plenty of time to socialize with the kids next door.

Quote:
I was seriously shocked. :LOL I'm also vaguely horrified-- though he knows that letters make sounds, he seems to be a whole-word reader for the most part. I have no idea what to make of this, but Mike thinks it's very cool (since he taught himself to read the same way). We may have to do some formal phonics instruction later on, or maybe he's just absorbed a heck of a lot more than I thought. We'll see!
I was a sight reader, as was DH and now DD1 is a strong sight reader. We've been going through Ordinary Parent's Guide to Teaching Reading, just reading the word lists and the text, letting her absorb patterns as she will. I'm not pushing phonics until we're starting spelling in another two years or so. We've got just three lessons to go and no words in her regular vocabulary have stumped her. She did have a problem with church type words like Christ and choir (I was so proud) but we checked out a couple books for read-aloud (The Church Mouse and sequels... can't recommend them too highly) with that terminology and that did the trick. Ah, I digress. My point was intended to be that she's advancing just fine by doing not much more than reading.
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#127 of 284 Old 06-14-2005, 09:37 AM
 
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#128 of 284 Old 06-14-2005, 11:39 AM
 
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I hope you ladies don't mind if I chime in here. I am having some fun supporting my wonderful, brilliant DS who is now in 2nd grade reading and will be moving up to 3rd grade reading at the beginning of next school year. His kindergarten teacher sent me a letter home hoping I would try to test my DS out of first grade and put him in second grade next year. Have any of you have a child skip a grade in school?
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#129 of 284 Old 06-14-2005, 01:19 PM
 
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SKIP HIM. Here's all you need to know:
A Nation Deceived: How Schools Hold Back America's Brightest Students

Quote:
Originally Posted by DreamsInDigital
I hope you ladies don't mind if I chime in here. I am having some fun supporting my wonderful, brilliant DS who is now in 2nd grade reading and will be moving up to 3rd grade reading at the beginning of next school year. His kindergarten teacher sent me a letter home hoping I would try to test my DS out of first grade and put him in second grade next year. Have any of you have a child skip a grade in school?
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#130 of 284 Old 06-14-2005, 01:51 PM
 
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My biggest concern is that my girls learn how to pronounce words properly. It's not uncommon for advanced readers to intuit the correct meaning of a word, make up a pronounciation and move on. This is embarassing, but I was well into my 30's before I realized that "mis-led", a word I spoke frequently and "misled" read were the same word. I'd always read the latter "mizeled" with a long I.

I make sure DD1 can see the book when I'm reading aloud so she can follow along when she feels like it. During The Wind in the Willows her eyes never left the book. I intend to do the same thing with books on tape, and make sure a copy is available for reading along.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Britishmum
Ha! I was a fluent reader when I started school but was taught phonics for a year. It was a total mystery to me. At the end of the year my parents were told I was a 'non-reader' as I had scored 0 on the reading test. Sigh.
IIRC, we were taught phonics commencing in third grade for spelling only. Looking at the whole lessons in Ordinary Parent's Guide, it boggles my mind thinking how people could learn to read with pure phonics. There are so many pronounciations for the diphthongs that it seems like every one would end up being a sight word.

I recently read an account of a study that purportedly showed that children who were read aloud to at home were actually at a reading disadvantage! (I'm not one to use exclamation marks willy nilly.) I wish I'd saved the link. It was one of the studies cited by the Bushies to push the expenive "research proven" phonics programs on school districts receiving federal money over less expensive options like SSR (you can read more about it on Jim Trelease's website). The gist of it was that kids were given lists of words to read with no context and only asked to say the words. This is reading?
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#131 of 284 Old 06-14-2005, 01:51 PM
 
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Oh Charles Baudelaire, thank you so much for that website!
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#132 of 284 Old 06-14-2005, 02:00 PM
 
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Originally Posted by NoHiddenFees
IIRC, we were taught phonics commencing in third grade for spelling only.
I'm really thinking about this. It's possible we did some earlier, but they didn't make a big deal of it. The only thing I recall for sure is that phonics came well after we started reading lessons.
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#133 of 284 Old 06-14-2005, 02:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DreamsInDigital
I hope you ladies don't mind if I chime in here. I am having some fun supporting my wonderful, brilliant DS who is now in 2nd grade reading and will be moving up to 3rd grade reading at the beginning of next school year. His kindergarten teacher sent me a letter home hoping I would try to test my DS out of first grade and put him in second grade next year. Have any of you have a child skip a grade in school?

My dd skipped a grade. What specifically would you like to know about it?

"Our task is not to see the future, but to enable it."
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#134 of 284 Old 06-14-2005, 04:25 PM
 
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#135 of 284 Old 06-14-2005, 09:47 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DreamsInDigital
I hope you ladies don't mind if I chime in here. I am having some fun supporting my wonderful, brilliant DS who is now in 2nd grade reading and will be moving up to 3rd grade reading at the beginning of next school year. His kindergarten teacher sent me a letter home hoping I would try to test my DS out of first grade and put him in second grade next year. Have any of you have a child skip a grade in school?
What is DS's birthday? We've homeschooled until now, but DD will enter 2nd grade next year (public "Gifted" school). She is a Jan 1999 "baby."

 

 

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#136 of 284 Old 06-14-2005, 11:12 PM
 
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I hate to see people spending a lot of time on phonics with children who are already readers. It's really a waste of time, as they have already intuited the rules that govern the language, and can even be confusing, as phonics rules don't apply to many, many words.
Funny you should mention this. In talking about our own experiences as kids who were labeled gifted, my DH and I both brought up the weird, frustrating, annoying experience of having phonics pushed on us like crazy when we were both already reading fluently. It's one of the times I do indeed remember feeling like a total square peg as a kid. (I assume I was a whole-word reader. I have an unusual sight memory for words. IMO, it's actually why I am a very accurate speller; I don't at all rely on phonetic spelling.)

grateful mother to DD, 1/04, and DS, 2/08

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#137 of 284 Old 06-15-2005, 01:30 PM
 
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On another topic--I have a post in Toddlers about DD's current obsession with educational computer games. If anyone here has any input on this, I'd appreciate it. She is very, very focused on these games, in the same way she was very, very focused on learning the alphabet, and continues to be on field guides. I am unsure how/if to limit her appropriately.

grateful mother to DD, 1/04, and DS, 2/08

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#138 of 284 Old 06-15-2005, 01:52 PM
 
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#139 of 284 Old 06-15-2005, 03:20 PM
 
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Hi!

Long time, no write! It's been fun catching up on the posts!

Remember how I was so worried about potty and Goo? She is now potty trained! IN a true stubborn kid mode, we chose a "potty day". On potty day, she started using the potty. Poop and pee. All of the time! She had the ability, she just didn't want to do it!

Intersting discussion on phonics. I suck at phonics. I am a sight reader, but I spell terribly. I wonder why? Goo is starting to spell words (her name and Zoo) with the magnetic letters. When we catch her, she gets angry, so I am trying not to call attention to it right now....
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#140 of 284 Old 06-15-2005, 04:25 PM
 
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Lorax, I posted my reply in the toddler forum. I agree with isisjade.
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#141 of 284 Old 06-15-2005, 09:07 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Foobar
Remember how I was so worried about potty and Goo? She is now potty trained! IN a true stubborn kid mode, we chose a "potty day". On potty day, she started using the potty. Poop and pee. All of the time! She had the ability, she just didn't want to do it!
That is so funny. DD potty trained for one weekend when she was 23 months. Then wanted back in the diapers. Finally she told me she would be potty trained for my birthday--- June 3. (this was in early spring). On June 2nd she put on panties and that was that :

 

 

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#142 of 284 Old 06-15-2005, 10:41 PM
 
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TiredX2-

my Dh is like this. He just says "I'm going to do X" and he does it! I don't know how?
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#143 of 284 Old 06-15-2005, 11:29 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by isisjade
For what it's worth, I read your post, and I (respectfully, of course) disagree with what has been posted so far in response. Gifted children learn well from a variety of media, so I think using the computer is a good thing. I think gifted children also get very intense when learning something, and they need to be allowed sufficient time to explore their interests.

I have found that not limiting my son to activities that interest him (including computer games and educational television) works well for us. I choose the content (i.e., I haven't introduced him to anything I wouldn't want him to pursue), but he chooses how much time to spend. He might spend an hour a day on the computer for a week or so, then he doesn't come back to it for another few weeks. It's the same thing whether it's puzzles, computer games, a show such as Between the Lions or whatever. It's just another mode of learning to me. It sounds to me like things would be easier for both of you if you gave into it for a while and let her figure out what she is trying to figure out. (If you end up on the computer 8-hours a day for 3 weeks or something, well then, you might want to reevaluate.)

Hope this helps. It just seems to work well for us.

:

Abi on the computer, age 2

She will focus on it for a few days and then move on. She self-regulates very well, probably because I've let her learn how to do that.

7yo: "Mom,I know which man is on a quarter and which on is on a nickel. They both have ponytails, but one man has a collar and the other man is naked. The naked man was our first president."
 
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#144 of 284 Old 06-16-2005, 12:40 AM
 
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That picture of Abi is so cute! :LOL I have one just like that of Hollis around the same age. I'll have to dig through the pics later to see if I can find it.
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#145 of 284 Old 06-16-2005, 10:15 AM
 
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We go through days when ds wants to do Elmo Keyboardoroma all the time or Baby Type. Some days he has no interest, go figure? He has picked up new words on the sites though and Baby Type has him saying letters because it's kids saying it and not me.
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#146 of 284 Old 06-16-2005, 12:37 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Ah, phonics. I will behave myself and say only this: I know that I'm a freak, but I taught myself to read and I did it phonetically. I'd never have been able to learn to read whole words, I was much too detail oriented. It would have ticked me off that words could have the same pronunciation and different configurations (i.e. "they're" and "there") or vice versa. I agree that there's no point in forcing phonics on a child who is a fluent reader, but many children can't learn to read by sight at all; that's why remedial reading programs are, for the most part, based on phonics.

I can't really relate to BeanBean's whole word style. It doesn't make any sense to me.

We're having potty regression issues, which make me tense and hysterical (I know, it doesn't help). I need to chill out before I decide on a plan of action. Meanwhile, BeanBean will ask for a diaper when he has to poop, and if I don't put it on him, he goes on the floor. It wouldn't bother me if it was accidental, but this is seriously deliberate-- he'll wait until I'm imobilized doing something else and then run away to poop on the floor. : I have no idea what this is about, I guess it's just a control thing and I need to chill but it's seriously getting to me-- I hate cleaning poop off the floor! Hm. I think *this* post belongs in Toddlers. :LOL

Rynna, Mama to Bean (8), Boobah (6), Bella (4) and Bear (2)
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#147 of 284 Old 06-16-2005, 12:58 PM
 
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I guess I'm the luddite. We don't own any children's software and didn't allow DD1 any computer use before 3. We were originally going to wait until at least 5, but since she was already an avid reader we saw no reason to wait longer just on principle. Now she plays a little Bejeweled, does maybe 1/2 hour of Rosetta Stone (she has no limits or lesson plans, it's freeform) and types in emails one or two emails a week (she dictates, I write them down then she types them out, again freeform... she'll play with changing colours, doing spellchecks, etc.). At the library, she plays the Magic Schoolbus Games.

We've also started letting her watch TV and she has her own Netflix queue of nature videos. We don't get even a single TV channel, so she's playing by the same rules we are. With the exception of bugs bunny, we don't do DVD's for entertainment. She is however, very excited at the prospect of going to the cinema next year to see The Fantastic Mr. Fox. I just pray they don't Americanize it and I hope they do the songs, 'cause she's got them all memorized.
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#148 of 284 Old 06-16-2005, 01:07 PM
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Originally Posted by eilonwy
but many children can't learn to read by sight at all; that's why remedial reading programs are, for the most part, based on phonics.

This is correlational but not causational. The existence of phonics-based programs doesn't PROVE that "many children can't learn to read by sight at all." It only proves that the powers that be have chosen phonics-based programs, which is misguided, IMHO. And many, many kids go through these phonics-based remedial programs and still think they can't read, or hate to read.

The English language borrows from so many other languages, and we have so many exceptions to the rules, that phonics is often a complete headache for kids and no wonder they think they can't read or don't like to read.

The VAST majority of words you and I read are memorized--- can you imagine having to sound out every word? We'd hate reading, too. Why, or why, do we decide that memorization of words is "ok" when you're an adult (i.e. you and I don't have to sound everything out), but it's "not ok" when you are a kid? Why not let them onto the tricks of the trade earlier? Why make them figure it out on their own, if they ever do, that's it's perfectly acceptable to memorize words?

Kids often don't know that when you see the same letters in the same combination, you always have the same word. Teaching sight-based reading allows them to figure this out.

I advocate teaching whole-language (sight-based reading) first, and then following up with a little phonics instruction, for when you hit those harder words.

"Our task is not to see the future, but to enable it."
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#149 of 284 Old 06-16-2005, 02:09 PM
 
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Hollis and I both taught ourselves to read using phonics methods. Nan is more of a whole language learner, but there are some simple words she can't read because she STILL hasn't gotten the basic vowel sounds down. It's pretty weird to watch her read "butterfly" fluently and then get flummoxed with "lad."

I think eventually everyone becomes a whole language reader because you end up memorizing all the words you know. But lots of us start out as phonics readers and find it easier to learn that way.
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#150 of 284 Old 06-16-2005, 02:38 PM
 
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Originally Posted by A&A

The English language borrows from so many other languages, and we have so many exceptions to the rules, that phonics is often a complete headache for kids and no wonder they think they can't read or don't like to read.
This is true, but I'd like to add that the 5,000 words we use MOST COMMONLY -- that is, the bottom of our language pyramid, as it were -- are indeed phonics-based. Some estimate that 89% of our words follow reliable phonics rules. It's primarily when you get into Latinate and Greek-based root words that you encounter a problem, but if basic phonics are mastered, then the "exceptions" are less of a problem.

However, when a child is strictly taught by a whole-language method, that does something worse to English: it changes it into Chinese, as if words were entire-unit pictograms to be memorized one by one.

English is vastly different from other languages in the extent of its vocabulary -- more than five times the number of words (an estimate, of course, as new words are being added all the time) than French or German. To memorize something like a half a million words is an impossible task indeed.

Wouldn't it be far easier to memorize English's phonemes -- of which there are about 40-45?

I tell you, that'd be easier than memorizing 500,000 separate words.


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The VAST majority of words you and I read are memorized--- can you imagine having to sound out every word? We'd hate reading, too. Why, or why, do we decide that memorization of words is "ok" when you're an adult (i.e. you and I don't have to sound everything out), but it's "not ok" when you are a kid? Why not let them onto the tricks of the trade earlier? Why make them figure it out on their own, if they ever do, that's it's perfectly acceptable to memorize words?
For one, you're confusing how a fluent reader reads with how a beginning reader reads. Here is an example of how this would feel like for you now as an adult.

Imagine you are reading a novel in Spanish or French. You've had a few years of Spanish and French, but aren't entirely proficient yet. There are many words you don't know. You DO NOT read those words as a totality / total unit the first time you see them.

What do you do?
Why, you sound them out.

Think of other, less familiar words you may have seen at some point in your life. My daughter went through a dinosaur phase a few years ago, so all of a sudden, I was trying to master words like pachycephalosaurus, parasaurolophus, et cetera.

Now, naturally, I see them as an entire unit. The first time, I broke them down into individual phonemes -- a habit that came so naturally to me that I didn't even have to think of what I was doing. Over time, the mind simplifies the procedure...BUT it doesn't start off that way. That's true of any mastered subject -- you don't have to break it down into pieces once you've mastered it, but you need to start off that way. Think of driving a car.


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Kids often don't know that when you see the same letters in the same combination, you always have the same word. Teaching sight-based reading allows them to figure this out.
Actually, what sight-reading does in practice is allows them to completely confuse words that have many of the same letters in the same combinations.

I can't tell you how many times my kids will read angel for angle, women for woman, and I'd hate to tell you what they come up with for a sentence like, "The red pen is your friend."

Quote:
I advocate teaching whole-language (sight-based reading) first, and then following up with a little phonics instruction, for when you hit those harder words.

And that's precisely where phonics would be least useful, actually, because "those harder words" are generally Greek and Latin, and they DON'T follow many of the same phonics rules as the Anglo-Saxon-based English words that form the core of our vocabulary.
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