Addressing the Special Needs of Gifted Children, #6 - Page 26 - Mothering Forums

Forum Jump: 
Reply
 
Thread Tools
#751 of 776 Old 12-03-2005, 04:23 AM
 
Velveteen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Pacific Northwest
Posts: 1,493
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Hello~ looking for teachma, as your pm box is full!!
Velveteen is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
#752 of 776 Old 12-03-2005, 01:07 PM
 
ChristaN's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Colorado
Posts: 3,159
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Dd's first word was cat followed by mama and wah-boo (bless you) when someone sneezed. Then she started chanting "twuck, twuck, twuck" whenever she heard the garbage truck out front. It was too cute .
ChristaN is offline  
#753 of 776 Old 12-03-2005, 08:44 PM
 
catgirl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Inner space
Posts: 635
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Saw a couple at B&N today which might fit the bill: Grossology and You, and....DARN!...WHAT WAS IT....it was by Wayne someone, all about poop, or something - if you search at Amazon it should probably show up, and you could check inside each of them. Sorry, I was chasing ds around and didn't have a pencil...
catgirl is offline  
#754 of 776 Old 12-03-2005, 08:51 PM
 
eilonwy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Lost
Posts: 15,067
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Ah, Grossology! They had an exhibit at a local children's museum this fall (no, we didn't get to it... ) so the book has been flying off library shelves ever since. I know BeanBean will love it, if I ever get a hold of it!

Rynna, Mama to Bean (8), Boobah (6), Bella (4) and Bear (2)
eilonwy is offline  
#755 of 776 Old 12-03-2005, 09:31 PM
 
loraxc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: In the Truffula Trees
Posts: 4,388
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
About first words--I have this fascinating book called How Babies Talk, and they discuss how you can tell a bit about a baby's personality based on the first words they acquire. "Socializers" learn words like "Hi" and "Bye" and "Dankoo" (thank you) and "categorizers" learn lots of nouns. Froglet was a total categorizer...I think her first five were cat, fish, dada, car, and ball, or something like that. (Mama, I must add, was something like word #23! As I recall, "ant" and "bee" came above me in the hierarchy... )

I wrote down Froglet's words as they came, to some extent, but mainly because we are keeping an extensive baby "journal" (it's a daybook) that we have around all the time. It's a bit of a family tradition in DH's family, and a lovely one, I must say...so fun to flip back through, both the one for DD and the one my husband, as he has one too! Anyway, it was easy to jot them down when she was first picking up words. I also just find language acquisition fascinating! (Hence my owning the above book, which I really must recommend--SO interesting!)

grateful mother to DD, 1/04, and DS, 2/08

loraxc is offline  
#756 of 776 Old 12-03-2005, 09:34 PM
 
eilonwy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Lost
Posts: 15,067
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I was just wondering if the Christian/not Jewish mammas here "do" Santa with their kids. I've been reading over some of the Santa threads, but I don't think that it would be right of me to post because a) we're Jewish and b) I've got a kid who looked at the Snoopy walking around the Mall of America and said "Um, mom, Snoopy is not a dog, that's a guy in a suit!" and looked at me like I was crazy.

So I thought, is this because I'm raising BeanBean to be a cynic by telling him that some things are not real, or because he's a bit more insightful into that sort of thing than average kids, or is it because I'm sucking the joy out of his childhood? That's really not my goal, but if leaving the joy in involves telling the kids that Harry Potter is a real kid who can do real magic and the Secret Garden is a real place... well, I'm not sure that I'm up for that, either.

The Thomas the Train analogy has come up several times, too, but I'm not sure how much water that will hold with BeanBean, who has grandparents living literally about 20 minutes from the Strasburg Railroad (in heavy traffic!) where Thomas is to be found.. well, just about everywhere. He knows that Thomas is a real train, and knows that the real train doesn't talk unless you push buttons... but at the same time, he knows that there's a fair amount of pretending involved. When Thomas gets turned off, we don't tell him that he's going to sleep, you know? BeanBean understands that Thomas the Train is a machine with a name, and it doesn't bother him that Thomas isn't really more human than that.

Should it bother me that my son is so... cynical? I mean, he doesn't *seem* overly cynical to me, but should I be concerned?

Rynna, Mama to Bean (8), Boobah (6), Bella (4) and Bear (2)
eilonwy is offline  
#757 of 776 Old 12-03-2005, 10:06 PM
 
mamaley's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Posts: 6,212
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Sorry to just pop in here, but I was wondering if any of you have a child who is visual-spatially gifted? I don't know that my son is gifted, but I really want to learn more about what it means to have a child who is a visual-spatial learner. I recently read an article about it and it was word-for-word my ds. I started a thread in Parenting Issues if anyone wants to check it out.
mamaley is offline  
#758 of 776 Old 12-03-2005, 10:22 PM
 
teachma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: My new house!
Posts: 4,572
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by eilonwy

Should it bother me that my son is so... cynical? I mean, he doesn't *seem* overly cynical to me, but should I be concerned?
Only if he's going to be IQ tested by the same tester we used. And then, you'd better watch out for both cynicism and sarcasm!!

We had a very similar experience to your Snoopy one, with ds (at age 2 yrs 4 mos) and Santa. We attended a Christmas party at his daycare (which was when we lived in CA, before we lived near enough to my mom to have her as our babysitter). The care provider's husband dressed as Santa, and all the children took turns sitting on his lap and receiving gifts. After ds's turn, he came back and told me, "That Santa man smelled just like Craig." (Leave it to my highly sensitive kid to notice that!) I kind of let it go, but the next time we saw a Santa out and around, ds asked, "Whose daddy is that?" I was kind of confused, but he quickly clarified, "Well, if the other Santa was Mason's daddy, whose daddy is this one?" I was actually a little happy because I am so not a believer in misleading children by upholding our cultural "myths," for lack of a better word. Somehow, ds already knows the tooth fairy is imaginary, too, but I have no idea how...he hasn't even lost his first tooth yet.

I don't think a cynical child turns out to be any more cynical that the average cynical adult when all is said and done...he only gets a head start! I think certain adults and children will find that quality off-putting; however, I know your objective in life is far from creating mainstream children who fit the norm of anyone's expectations. ( I also know that, even if that were to be your goal, you'd be outta luck with the kids you've got! )

I don't think I successfully answered your questions, but I will say, I'm right there with ya.
teachma is offline  
#759 of 776 Old 12-03-2005, 10:59 PM
 
teachma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: My new house!
Posts: 4,572
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by eilonwy
. Other testers seem to be trying to prove the point that most people are average,
This is kind of the feeling I got from that woman on the day we met and went over the results. I had initially approached this whole testing thing very hesitantly for a few reasons. Mostly, I have a complex about being "typed." This may sound incredibly insecure or...something, but we live in a very affluent county where parents do so much to enrich their children's lives and everyone is an over-achiever. Basically the top 30% of public high school students here (we have a total of about 1800 kids) go to Ivy League colleges, and everyone's parents think their kids are gifted. I know many kids in our town perform above average on tests that purportedly generate IQ-equivalent scores (like the OLSAT, my favorite). And I think this tester assumed that I was just another one of those pushy parents who think my kid is remarkable. The thing is, dh and I are SO not those people.

I have pretty much been thinking of his test results the same was that mamaverdi (I think that's who it was) suggested. I was kind of thinking like his scores represent the bottom level of his ability, at his worst. And, hey, that's pretty good for havng been at his worst!
teachma is offline  
#760 of 776 Old 12-04-2005, 02:21 AM
 
USAmma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Arizona
Posts: 18,573
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by catgirl
Saw a couple at B&N today which might fit the bill: Grossology and You, and....DARN!...WHAT WAS IT....it was by Wayne someone, all about poop, or something - if you search at Amazon it should probably show up, and you could check inside each of them. Sorry, I was chasing ds around and didn't have a pencil...
I've heard that THe Gas We Pass is a good one.

7yo: "Mom,I know which man is on a quarter and which on is on a nickel. They both have ponytails, but one man has a collar and the other man is naked. The naked man was our first president."
 
USAmma is offline  
#761 of 776 Old 12-12-2005, 01:44 PM
 
ChristaN's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Colorado
Posts: 3,159
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
This thread has been quiet, but I wanted to pop in with a question for you mamas.

My younger dd (kindergartener) has a little boy in her class who is very, very bright. I volunteer in the classroom during centers reading time and he leaves to go work with another teacher b/c he is reading 5th grade books (according to the TA in the class). He then returns toward the end of centers and does whatever he has time for. He tends to finish up really quickly b/c the work is pretty easy (like last week they were supposed to go around the room and write down 20 words that they saw on things like books, water bottles, the walls, etc.)

So anyway, last week, he finished and was wandering around looking unhappy and kept asking me what he could do now. I asked if he was bored and he said, "yes!" Really all I had for him was to play with math manipulatives or to help the other kids. He didn't really want to do that. He's also very mature for a kindergartener and I keep finding myself thinking that, if he were my kid, I'd be wanting to skip him right into 2nd grade next year.

I saw the mom after school a few days later and mentioned how bright her son was to her thinking that maybe we could have a conversation about how he might be better served in the school and grade acceleration since I'm thinking of trying to fight that fight for my older dd later and I know it will be a fight at this school. The mom tells me that they held him out a year (he could have started kg the year before -- he's 13 months older than my kindergartener who is in his class) and how pleased she is that he's at the top of the class and that's why they waited to start him so that he would be there. Now, this kid would be at the top of a first grade class academically, too and I really feel bad for him b/c he really doesn't belong in kindergarten.

To my question -- do I just drop it and say nothing further? I feel bad for this kid and truly believe that they are doing him a disservice by holding him back with a group of younger kids when he is so obviously ready to be elsewhere and so bored much of the time.
ChristaN is offline  
#762 of 776 Old 12-12-2005, 03:15 PM
 
eilonwy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Lost
Posts: 15,067
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by ChristaN
I saw the mom after school a few days later and mentioned how bright her son was to her thinking that maybe we could have a conversation about how he might be better served in the school and grade acceleration since I'm thinking of trying to fight that fight for my older dd later and I know it will be a fight at this school. The mom tells me that they held him out a year (he could have started kg the year before -- he's 13 months older than my kindergartener who is in his class) and how pleased she is that he's at the top of the class and that's why they waited to start him so that he would be there. Now, this kid would be at the top of a first grade class academically, too and I really feel bad for him b/c he really doesn't belong in kindergarten.

To my question -- do I just drop it and say nothing further? I feel bad for this kid and truly believe that they are doing him a disservice by holding him back with a group of younger kids when he is so obviously ready to be elsewhere and so bored much of the time.
How sad for that little guy!

I would talk to the mother about the difference between being at the top of his class and being gifted, because it sounds to me like she really doesn't know. I'm curious as to what she expects to accomplish by holding him back, and what she thinks the kids are supposed to be capable of at the end of the year. Maybe she doesn't think that her son is that extraordinary, and that's why she held him back? I'm trying to wrap my head around it, but I think I'd really need to know where she's coming from. It's possible that she doesn't realize that he would "be at the top of his class" in first grade right now, too, or that he could possibly "be at the top of his class" in second grade this year. If she's one of those people who believes that having a bright child is simply a matter of having a child who knows more stuff, she may believe that she's doing right by him to keep him in a class full of kids who know less and are less emotionally mature.

I'm with you, though, I'm really bummed for the kid.

Rynna, Mama to Bean (8), Boobah (6), Bella (4) and Bear (2)
eilonwy is offline  
#763 of 776 Old 12-12-2005, 07:06 PM
 
Emeline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 7
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by eilonwy
I was just wondering if the Christian/not Jewish mammas here "do" Santa with their kids. I've been reading over some of the Santa threads, but I don't think that it would be right of me to post because a) we're Jewish and b) I've got a kid who looked at the Snoopy walking around the Mall of America and said "Um, mom, Snoopy is not a dog, that's a guy in a suit!" and looked at me like I was crazy.
We're Christian and we celebrate with a tree and presents and all that, but we don't "do" Santa Clause.

There are various reasons, the biggest for us being that we like to keep the focus of Christmas on the celebration of the birth of Christ. I realize Christmas is purely symbolic, and the Christians of years ago would bawlk at even the most humble of celebrations and would probably be shocked if they saw the commercialized circus the celebration of Christ's birth has become. It's tough nowadays to do both, Santa seems to have taken over and many people think we're nuts when we tell them. They say things like "You CAN'T have Christmas without Santa Clause!". Well, of course we can.

It's difficult to sheild a child however, and I don't intend to. When we explained to ds that Santa Clause was just a story and not real he kind of looked at us like "Duh?". Another reason we don't do Santa Clause is the fact that I'm just not comfortable lying to my child. Christmas to a child is sooo magical, and much of that magic stems from Santa Clause. When they find out the truth it just seems to take the magic of Christmas away. I want ds's joy of Christmas to stem from things that will only grow as he does, things like family, spending time together, giving presents, having our candlelight Christmas Eve service at church, ect.... Like I said, we're Christian, and we've tried to teach our ds about the Lord as best we can. However, we're telling him that God exsists, but you have to believe in him even though you can't see him, that's what faith is. We do the same thing with Santa Clause. We spin a tale and perpetuate it by taking bites out the cookies left for him on Christmas Eve or leaving boot prints by the fireplace. Eventhough most parents would not lie to their child, in this case parents will do almost anything to keep their child's faith in Santa Clause alive. Then one day, it happens, the child comes to the realization that not only is there no Santa Clause, their parents lied to them, made them believe in something that just wasn't true. For what? To use as a threat for a couple of months of good behavior? They may start to wonder what else we've lie about. Hey, what about God? They told me he's real, but they told me the same thing about Santa, could that be a lie too?

This is turning into a rant, sorry, I've been catching heck the last few weeks from various sources.

Emeline
Emeline is offline  
#764 of 776 Old 12-12-2005, 10:37 PM
 
teachma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: My new house!
Posts: 4,572
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Emeline
When we explained to ds that Santa Clause was just a story and not real he kind of looked at us like "Duh?".
See, I've always wondered how many kids are out there maintaining their belief in Santa (and his cronies, the Tooth Fairy, etc.) for the sake of their parents, who expect them to believe and might be heartbroken to learn that their little children no longer believe. In various conversations w/ ds over the years, whenever I've disclosed that something is imaginary, he's always given me that "duh!" kind of expression...like he obviously knew it already, for a long time. Kids (not just gifted ones) are smarter than adults often give them credit for being. I feel like many of them pretend the whole thing to keep their moms and dads happy.
teachma is offline  
#765 of 776 Old 12-12-2005, 10:48 PM
 
eilonwy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Lost
Posts: 15,067
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by teachma
See, I've always wondered how many kids are out there maintaining their belief in Santa (and his cronies, the Tooth Fairy, etc.) for the sake of their parents, who expect them to believe and might be heartbroken to learn that their little children no longer believe. In various conversations w/ ds over the years, whenever I've disclosed that something is imaginary, he's always given me that "duh!" kind of expression...like he obviously knew it already, for a long time. Kids (not just gifted ones) are smarter than adults often give them credit for being. I feel like many of them pretend the whole thing to keep their moms and dads happy.
: That's my son. He always kind of winks conspiratorially, and gets really into the game of Let's Pretend. As long as you're not trying to pass it off as truth, BeanBean will jump right in and play along. of course, he can also spend hours and hours pretending to be a helicopter or an airplane. "I'm a supersonic helicoptor. BooBah is a supersonic airplane. You're just a regular airplane. We're going to fly away from you now, but it's okay; We'll come back, every time."

I can't pretend to BeanBean that I believe; he's sweet and caring, and can be very empathic. Besides I want him to believe the important things. If I pretend to be upset that he doesn't believe in something like the tooth fairy, how is he going to accept that I'm *really* upset when he pinches my nipple (or whatever)?

Rynna, Mama to Bean (8), Boobah (6), Bella (4) and Bear (2)
eilonwy is offline  
#766 of 776 Old 12-12-2005, 11:00 PM
 
teachma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: My new house!
Posts: 4,572
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by eilonwy

I can't pretend to BeanBean that I believe; he's sweet and caring, and can be very empathic.
See, and my ds is very sensitive and emotional...moreover, he is 100% total honesty incarnate. As in, he is so in touch with his true feelings, for better or worse, that he cannot even "lie" by saying, "Nice to see you, too," when we encounter a neighbor at Wild Oats if, in fact, he DOESN'T think it's nice to see her. Or by saying, "Thank you," when he isn't feeling particularly thankful. I think he expects this excruciating level of honesty from everyone, and as his mom, I sure ain't gonna be the one to betray that! (Though I know plenty others will.)
teachma is offline  
#767 of 776 Old 12-13-2005, 11:42 AM
 
allgirls's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Canada
Posts: 9,327
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
temper tantrums and developmental leaps

This is my problem of the day. Sophia is now 29mos old. She is a kid that seems to go along and then suddenly "leap" into a new stage. She doesn't develop gradually over time..well maybe she does but it appears to be a giant leap rather than a bunch of steps over time.

Anyway...lately she has been quite a handful...yelling, screaming, tantrums, hitting me, hitting baby(yeah we have a new baby in the house but I don't think that's the entire problem), just being downright difficult to live with. And it's really hard for me..if things aren't "just right" she screams. I think she's trying to control things around her and feels out of control. I was thinking this was because of the baby at first. It's been happening for about 3 weeks...baby will be 7 weeks tomorrow, but now I am thinking it's actually partly an internal thing.

Suddenly she has had a huge increase in her vocabulary. I am noticing her using bigger words, longer,more complicated sentences...well it's sudden and it's obvious. She can express herself really really well...but along with this the temper tantrums, acting out is also increasing.

Do you think it's related? Do you think a sudden larger understanding of the world and language is developing and is scaring her(she scares easily) and that she is maintaining or trying to maintain control?

Since she is very verbal you would think that obviously she is not frustrated by an inability to communicate...but maybe she is. Maybe she still "knows" a lot more than she is able to express. She can't write yet, or type, she is mad at herself because she can't read, she thinks she should be able to. She is trying to sound out words herself...I think she will teach herself to read but I am going to encourage it(not push). I think she is realising there are all these things she can't do and she wants to be able to do them now! We can't show her anything, she has to do it herself. As a result she can dress herself and wash herself and put her shoes on the right feet etc. etc. perfectly.

I am writing all this down for feedback but also trying to figure it out. I want to help her. I am trying to understand her and be gentle and help her through but I do have 3 other kids.

Help me please. Any practical advice, tips, understanding of what's actually going on with her and how to get through it?

Do you think teaching her to read would help..she seems open to it. I bought her the BOB books for Christmas.

One thing I have done is turn the tv off...I was depending on it a bit too much after baby came...but it's gone now. Except for the occasional video of course.
allgirls is offline  
#768 of 776 Old 12-13-2005, 01:39 PM
 
ChristaN's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Colorado
Posts: 3,159
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Just some commiseration here . My older dd threw the most amazing tantrums that I have ever seen when she was your dd's age. They happened multiple times a day and lasted for an hour or more. She'd scream, hit the walls, yell "I'm going to pee on the floor!!" and then do it... I'd sometimes put her in her room when I was about ready to kill the kid just so I could calm down myself, but for the most part, I just tried to express her feelings for her and force hold her while she was struggling against me and screaming. She'd eventually calm down and melt into my arms, but I got beat up in the mean time.

I totally understand what you are saying about her being very verbal so it seems like she ought to be able to express her feelings/needs in words and not be so frustrated. It did seem, though, like my dd was overwhelmed by her very intense feelings and, although she could speak like a little adult, she was still unable to wrap her words around what she was feeling because it was so very intense. If it is any kind of a light at the end of the tunnel, the tantrums did stop by around her 4th birthday for the most part. (I know that's a long ways off -- sorry!)
ChristaN is offline  
#769 of 776 Old 12-13-2005, 02:32 PM
 
OTMomma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Northern VA
Posts: 4,441
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Oh, Allgirls- I feel your pain. Those tempertantrums are awful! We went through a bad spell of them around the same age. One of the things that I found was a BIG issue for us was food, if my dd was hungry, low blood sugar, or had eaten something high in sugar or artificial crap, the least little thing would set her OFF! So I would take some time to look at her diet closely, in the craziness of having a new baby in the house, has her snack and meal schedule/quality been disturbed? Its easy to do.
I would also not discount the stress of the new baby in her life. Like ChristinaN said, she maybe able to express a lot more, but not everything she'd like to say. Being able to express complex feelings like "Mommy, I like my little sibling, but some times I feel Jealous and frustrated that we can't do all the same things we used to do." is hard. Heck, I know some adults that can't articulate their feelings that well. Helping her by saying those things for her and trying to give her attention during low stress activities, like stacking blocks together, may help.
Good luck!
Laura

Laura, Mama to Mya 7/02, Ian 6/07 and Anna 8/09
OTMomma is offline  
#770 of 776 Old 12-13-2005, 02:33 PM
 
OTMomma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Northern VA
Posts: 4,441
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Just curious- Are we going for the longest thread ever? Or should we start a new thread?

Laura, Mama to Mya 7/02, Ian 6/07 and Anna 8/09
OTMomma is offline  
#771 of 776 Old 12-13-2005, 02:44 PM
 
mamaverdi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Texas
Posts: 12,572
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
We had a ton of tantrums with three things you mentioned: too much tv/movies (and thus not enough outdoor or other play), new baby (and a sick one at that), and NOT being able to read yet. Time, limited tv/movies, and teaching him to read really helped.
mamaverdi is offline  
#772 of 776 Old 12-13-2005, 03:19 PM
 
allgirls's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Canada
Posts: 9,327
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Thanks for all the input...She's having a good morning.

All of the things mentioned contribute I am sure to the increase in her frustration but I think it's developmental as well...tossing books across the floor and yelling "I can't read it" is new though. I am still trying to read to her daily and if I cant' one of the older girls will but lately she will snatch the book out of our hands and read it herself..or try to. She will have a huge meltdown because she can't.

She was really bad last night because she got over-tired and then I couldn't get her to sleep...she had a full out meltdown for an hour...because we were in bed and she didn't want to sleep. But it was 12am...she was exhausted. This happened because baby woke up and wouldn't go back down...I was so busy getting her settled again I let Sophia go late.

Food has always been simple but if a meal is late or missed or even a snack she does get worse for sure. She was hungry last night...I gave her yogurt...bad mistake...had sugar. duh! What was I thinking..of course that set her off

I am trying to be a bit more mindful today...watch her food and purposely try to get her to nap..she doesn't nap much anymore though she did yesterday. When she naps we can't hope to get her to bed before 10pm but usually that's a good time for her.

She also gets a good 12 hrs at night.

But she was sleeping 14 hrs at night..so maybe she needs a nap again on the days she only gets 12 hrs at night. I never thought of that.

Anyway...thanks for the input. I think sitting and letting her read those simple BOB books will help her somewhat.

PLus more mama time is always good.
allgirls is offline  
#773 of 776 Old 12-13-2005, 07:54 PM
 
courtenay_e's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: In my own little piece of paradise
Posts: 8,111
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by CAmomto1
I introduced myself on the last thread, but here I am again...

Question - has anyone here had to negotiate with their child's school for advancement in one subject while staying with their age-mates the rest of the day? DD has strengths in math, and is doing at least first grade level math, possibly second grade, depending on whose scope and sequence you look at. She'll be in a K class at a private school this fall, and they use Math Their Way. This curriculum is SO not what DD needs in order to move forward and be challenged. In talking with her future teacher last spring, she assured me that DD would be appropriately challenged, not to worry. (The issue of reading came up as well, as DD can read, too.) Her teacher seemed sincere, but I can't help but wonder if she figured I was just one of 'those' parents who thinks their child is brighter than everyone else's.

Honestly, if I had my way she'd be in a first grade class from the start, but last spring they didn't have any spots, so we accepted the K spot with our fingers crossed that we'd be able to work something out. Now I'm wondering if we've made a big mistake. I love the school in general, from what I've seen and heard about it, and I know that emotionally and socially it's likely a wonderful place for DD to be. But I can't help but also worry about her academic experiences.

Any advice? Do I wait a week, a month, into the year before registering concerns? I'm a worrier by nature and I know this is going to weigh heavily on my mind.

I'd planned on hs'ing, but right now school seems like a better choicce overall for DD. I hope it is - we're giving it a year to see how it goes.

Anyway, I'm rambling. TIA for any help or support.

Okay. THis is coming from a mom who WAS a gifted child, who has gifted kids. I would hope you would insist on evaluation immediately, and then placement in classes which reflect the level at which your child performs. It is so common for children to become "underacheivers" when they are bored and frustrated! And if they are blundering through stuff which she knew at least a year ago, she'll get bored and frustrated! She could end up hating school, and your one year run would be a waste! On the other hand, if she's challenged, it could be a totally different story. And here's a small hint. If they refuse to evaluate and place her according to her abilities, they are NOT a good emotional environment for her. Good luck!

Mama to two awesome kids. Wife to a wonderful, attached, loving husband. I love my job-- I'm a Midwife, Doula and Childbirth Educator, Classes forming now!

courtenay_e is offline  
#774 of 776 Old 12-13-2005, 10:58 PM
 
Emeline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 7
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I realized that aside from my Santa Clause rant, I never formally introduced myself. I'm mom to two wonderful children ds, just turned 4 and dd, newly 3 months old. I came across your board doing some research on giftedness because it is becoming more and more clear that ds may be gifted. He could just be really bright, but I thought I'd subscribe anyway. You'll have to forgive me as I have not read through this whole thread, so I'm not sure we fit here or not.

I won't go into boring details, but here are some things that have stuck out about our son the last few years:

*rolled over at 1 month, crawled at 3.5 months, walked at almost 6 months and ran by 7 months

*spoke his first word at 1 month old, had a vocabulary of over 50 words by 5 months, was stringing words together by 6 months and spoke in full sentences by 1 year

*always just had a greater sense of awareness and understanding than other babies

*hit all the milestones early, knew the alphabet and could count to 20 by 11 months, had figured out how to count backwards by 15 months and started saying the ABC's backwards around then too

*could read many words at 12 months, could read almost anything by 18 months. Was reading chapter books by 24 months, his first being "The Magic Treehouse" series. He finished those by 2.5 years old and polished off Stuart Little, Charlotte's Web and the The Mouse and the Motorcycle by 3. He's currently devouring the Chronicles of Narnia series and loving them

*He understood complex math concepts like addition, subtraction, multiplication, division and skip counting by 2.5 years

*Could do 100 piece puzzles by 18 months. Is now into those 3D ones of buildings and stuff

I don't want to bore you, that's our son in a nutshell though. I'm looking forward to meeting everyone here!
Emeline is offline  
#775 of 776 Old 12-13-2005, 11:22 PM
 
TiredX2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: it appears to be a handbasket
Posts: 20,029
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by OTMomma
Just curious- Are we going for the longest thread ever? Or should we start a new thread?
PLEASE start a new one.

I wish we could have more than one going at a time

 

 

TiredX2 is offline  
#776 of 776 Old 12-14-2005, 12:14 AM
 
OTMomma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Northern VA
Posts: 4,441
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
DONE!

http://www.mothering.com/discussions...76#post4277376

Laura, Mama to Mya 7/02, Ian 6/07 and Anna 8/09
OTMomma is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Drag and Drop File Upload
Drag files here to attach!
Upload Progress: 0
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Mothering Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off