Addressing the Special Needs of Gifted Children, #6 - Page 3 - Mothering Forums
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#61 of 776 Old 09-09-2005, 10:15 AM
 
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DD started school last Wednesday. I miss her and wish I had any *real* idea what is going on, but she seems to like it.

My stress about her being placed in the wrong grade seems to have been misplaced, so far at least.

Unfortunately her math is so far way too easy. I have told her that maybe they are just getting used to stuff, trying to get everyone on the same page, etc... We were unschooling so I had never really found out what she knows, what she knows how to do, etc... and it's cool to see a bit of that. They did a few logic problems DD "got" right away but otherwise they are just doing place value and grouping (BTW, this class is *supposed* to be two grades ahead of her chrological age).

Her handwriting improved vastly by day 2. I *knew* she could write better than she did, but apparently I wasn't enough of an audience :LOL Now it looks like perfectly acceptable 2nd grade scrawl. I can't believe they have spelling tests, though she seems to like seeing her progress through the week (she practiced her words Tuesday, Wednesday & Thursday night).

She has been placed next to a very "young" first grade boy, so she is hoping to be moved soon. He was pencil fighting with the other kids, so gets to sit next to DD because she wont I want her to have friends, and peers, kwim? Not just kids who annoy the crap out of her.

DS starts preschool next Thursday. We'll see how that goes. He is very rarely willing to sing along with traditional songs ("Confrontation" from Les Mis? Yes. "Itsy Bitsy Spider"? No) so the teacher will probably think he has been severely neglected his whole poor short life.

 

 

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#62 of 776 Old 09-09-2005, 11:39 AM
 
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Originally Posted by loraxc
Hey USamma, where did you get that magnetic board and letters? I think my DD might like something like that sometime relatively soon. She is interested in making words with her Leapfrog Fridge Phonics thing, but it only has one of each letter.
I got it through the Well-Trained Mind's website.
http://peacehillpress.com/index.asp?...PROD&ProdID=32

I got the one with two boards, which makes it much more child-friendly to use. Store the letters on one board and use the other for playing with letters.

7yo: "Mom,I know which man is on a quarter and which on is on a nickel. They both have ponytails, but one man has a collar and the other man is naked. The naked man was our first president."
 
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#63 of 776 Old 09-09-2005, 12:16 PM - Thread Starter
 
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USAmma, love the artwork. "Decimal Street" sounds like something Hollis would name one of his drawings.

I'm glad to hear that most kids here are having a good time at school. Nan started dance this week, and in a couple weeks the kids start the homeschool swim classes again. She's in the age 7-10 classes this year, which are a vast improvement over the 4-6 (now 4-7!) classes she's been stuck in for a while. In acro yesterday they were actually learning new stuff instead of doing straddle rolls and cartwheels over and over again. It's a miracle!

Hollis and I are starting his chemistry stuff on Monday. Stay tuned for exciting developments on the next episode of "Mom doesn't know what the heck she's doing."
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#64 of 776 Old 09-09-2005, 04:26 PM
 
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Originally Posted by lckrause
USAmma, love the artwork. "Decimal Street" sounds like something Hollis would name one of his drawings.
Actually that's what they call it in the math lesson. But I thought it was neat that she tried to spell it.

7yo: "Mom,I know which man is on a quarter and which on is on a nickel. They both have ponytails, but one man has a collar and the other man is naked. The naked man was our first president."
 
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#65 of 776 Old 09-09-2005, 07:53 PM
 
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I've been away from the boards for a while, so sorry if I am not caught up on what you all are talking about! I know that someone a ways back inquired about grade advancement for specific subjects & wanted to know if we had any luck in that area.

I really like dd's teacher this year & she had told me early on that, based on her informal evaluation, dd was reading around 7th-8th grade books. At parent orientation, she told us that she wasn't aware of there being any program at the school to advance for specific areas (what I had heard was through other parents and may have been rumor). She did mention testing for TAG, though.

I was a bit disappointed, but dd is really happy this year (almost every day has been "great"), so I figured that I'd give it a while & see how it went with the TAG testing. In any case, the teacher approached me after school today and (can I just brag ?), said that dd "blew her away" with the testing today. Dd apparently hit the ceiling on a large part of the test and tested at 12th grade reading level (she just turned 7 and is in 2nd grade)!

So, it at least sounds like she will be in TAG although it doesn't sound like specific area grade acceleration is going to happen. This is our first time around with TAG, so I don't know what to expect out of that, but hopefully she will be challenged and get to read interesting books rather than boring early readers.

I don't think that they have done math assessments yet, but dd is not nearly as advanced in math as she is in reading, so I'm not going to worry about that area. The kiddos also just started clogging lessons, and are having a blast. I am just so happy that my girls are having a good year. It is such a relief after last year!
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#66 of 776 Old 09-09-2005, 09:18 PM
 
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Originally Posted by isisjade
If I had a scanner, though, I would post a piece that he painted some time ago that says much about my DS's personality. We were painting at the art museum (maybe for the first time), and he drew six short, tentative lines, of varying colors. It is SO cautious and so sweet. That's one I'll save for sure.
It's so interesting how their artwork can be a total mirror of their personalities! By choice, my ds will only draw symmetrical designs, usually with straight lines, and sometimes quite ornately patterned- or, he'll do color-block stuff a la Mondrian. However, when asked (like at therapy, or now, at school) to draw something representational, he is able to draw the most detailed human- down to the fingernails and ear lobes- he would just never do this for "fun."
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#67 of 776 Old 09-09-2005, 09:22 PM
 
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#68 of 776 Old 09-09-2005, 10:35 PM
 
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Originally Posted by teachma
It's so interesting how their artwork can be a total mirror of their personalities!
:BeanBean's artwork consists of great, sweeping strokes of bright color (especially purple, but any will do). His prefered medium is markers on walls, though he did seem to thoroughly enjoy himself with stamp pads on the walls. :LOL What does that say about his personality? Larger than life, I guess! :LOL

Today, in a fit of je ne sais quois, I put a cute little barrette into BooBah's hair (purple, to match her outfit). BeanBean insisted on having one as well, so I pulled out the navy one. "Oh no, mamma," he said, "I want that one!" So I took out the bright pink barrette that he'd indicated. That's how my three year old son spent the morning-- wearing a bright pink barette and not a stitch else, going about his BeanBean business. :LOL He's quite a character!

Rynna, Mama to Bean (8), Boobah (6), Bella (4) and Bear (2)
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#69 of 776 Old 09-11-2005, 10:17 AM
 
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wow...this thread always gets ahead of me!

USAmma!~Thanks for posting that website...I have bookmarked it...looks like some great items/ideas on there!

There are some awesome artists among your kids...I am noticing that my dd is also pretty good at drawing...you should have seen the whale she drew on her magna doodle...it was quite recognisable...I wanted to take a pic of it but it got erased.

She is also trying to print her letters now...she does a very good H...I love watching her...she will say "one line down, another line down, one line across...H!!" as she is printing...so cute!

Yesterday as a light turned red when I turned left at a light she got very angry and said "no, it's red, it's red, that's iwegal"...lol...it's so cute to hear that little voice say things like that! :LOL

I am not having much energy for her these days but she is thriving despite it. I am ever so grateful she plays so well independantly. She likes preschool but is not really playing much with the kids...which is kind of frustrating as that was the whole point. But as long as she is content there I will continue to let her go. I notice she gravitates to older kids when there is a choice and I think it's because they talk so much better.

Several times now in the recent weeks she's been called "a little genius" by people we know...it's kind of taken me by surprise...but she communicates so well and the things she talks about and the questions she asks really surprises people...I constantly get asked "how old is she" and a shocked look when I say 26mos. Or I get "she's really tiny for her age" and then they realise she's only 2 :LOL .

Anyway...sorry to brag on her so much...with another baby coming in about 5 wks I figure I won't get much chance.

I wish I could respond more personally to threads but I get so far behind...but I do love reading about your little ones...I learn so much and get so many ideas from you ladies.
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#70 of 776 Old 09-13-2005, 01:24 PM
 
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Just a quickie today: Yesterday, someone asked BeanBean how old he was and he said, "I'll be three on my birthday." :LOL The woman who asked him was there with her son (about 16) and the kid just cracked up. :LOL

I talked to a lifeguard yesterday about swim lessons for BeanBean-- we werent' sure what group to put him in, since the preschool group lessons are for "three to five year olds" and have three levels, and the parent/child lessons are for 6-36 month olds. She said that it would be in BeanBean's best interest to put him in the second level of the preschool classes, because he could already do everything that they'd be trying to teach him in the first level and that parent/child classes are for kids who can't/won't swim on their own (which BeanBean most assuredly does). I told her that he won't be three until November, and she said that she's never seen a child under the age of four swim the way he does. It's all good, though. By the time we can afford to put him into lessons, he'll probably be at the third level of the preschool classes. Go, BeanBean! :LOL

Rynna, Mama to Bean (8), Boobah (6), Bella (4) and Bear (2)
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#71 of 776 Old 09-15-2005, 03:49 PM
 
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I have some good news that I wanted to share with more than just DH.

After worrying all summer about DD, school, placement, being challenged, approaching the teacher, etc. etc. etc. I had something good happen. Twice, DD's teacher has taken me aside to ask *me* how I'm feeling about DD and what she's been doing, and did I have any concerns. Today, she brought up the idea of a grade skip and invited me to observe the first grade class if I wanted to. I told her that ideally, I'd like for DD to stay in her class because it is a good place for her socially and emotionally, and have her (the teacher) differentiate the curriculum for DD as needed. Her reply was essentially that she'd like to do that, that she enjoys challenges like that. Before I left DD's teacher told me that she would be keeping her eye on DD and that we should keep our conversation going.

I feel so relieved to know that we are all truly on the same side and are all wanting to do what is going to be best for DD as a whole person.

Yesterday when she asked me if I had any concerns or feedback, I let her know that I wanted to make sure she gave DD a chance to really stretch her mind and show her what she's capable of. She let me know that she has already started pulling her aside to work with her one on one and start assessing where she is at. (I know where she's at, but it's better to ler her see it for herself than try to tell her what I see at home.)

I'm just so pleased that the school experience is going well so far and that we aren't facing any battles.
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#72 of 776 Old 09-15-2005, 04:45 PM
 
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CAmom,
That sounds so much like my dd's experience this year. Last year was a misery and I was really worried going into this school year. She is in second grade now. I've had virtually the same conversation w/ dd's teacher, too. She's awesome!

What was also really wonderful for my dd was that we adopted a manatee for her classroom from the Save the Manatee Club. I told dd that they might not be able to put the posters up, etc. The teacher, however, not only put up the pictures, but she revamped the whole science curricula for this week so that all they are learning about this week is manatees and their relatives. They are doing manatee math, had a speaker in who had been swimming with manatees, etc. My dd is in heaven with such a supportive teacher. The teacher also seems to be keenly aware of dd's different academic needs and is really working with her to meet them.

Now, I just have to worry about next year :LOL !
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#73 of 776 Old 09-15-2005, 11:16 PM
 
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Can I vent for a minute?

DD is obsessed with learning the names of birds. (I think I've talked about this before.) We have multiple bird guides around the house and they are among her most cherished possessions. She is just starting to really get into pretend play and imaginary play, and sometimes talks about things the birds in the books are "doing." Yesterday there was a whole monologue: "The Connecticut warblers are making pasta again!" (She also loves to read our pasta machine manual. ) DH told his mom this story because he thought it was cute, and because his whole family enjoys nature and birdwatching. MIL's response?

"That's just weird. You don't want her to be weird like that." :

grateful mother to DD, 1/04, and DS, 2/08

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#74 of 776 Old 09-16-2005, 11:47 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Lorax I'm sorry to hear your MIL is not being supportive. I think your DD sounds awesome. Reading the pasta machine manual is cracking me up. One time Hollis found the insert that comes with the tampons and was distraught because he thought I was going to die from toxic shock syndrome. :LOL Poor Hollis.
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#75 of 776 Old 09-16-2005, 12:20 PM
 
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"That's just weird. You don't want her to be weird like that."
Oh, that's just mean. I hope that she doesn't express cruel sentiments like that to your dd when she gets older!

Maybe you can find some birding activity that she can join in. My dd's obsession is ocean mammals. We have tried as best we can in our landlocked state to let her explore that by adopting sea animals through rescue organizations for her -- she gets newsletters from these organizations, too.

If we ever can manage to go home to the Bay Area, I plan to see if we can set her up to volunteer at the Marine Mammal Center. Actually, where we are, the Rocky Mountain Raptor program allows kids to volunteer with parents (they rehab injured birds of prey). I wonder if there is anything like that around you.
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#76 of 776 Old 09-16-2005, 01:57 PM
 
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Thanks for the support. I was surprised by this comment, since they aren't the kind of family who is obsessed with fitting in...or so I thought. I think she really reacted negatively to the whole idea of DD sight-reading and now thinks we are trying to raise some kind of freaky genius.

I mean, sometimes I worry too, but really, I just thought that was an innocently cute story. Some kids get obsessed with dinosaurs or contruction equipment and know all THEIR names, and people don't think that's weird, do they?

Some time when she's a bit older we will start taking her "birdwatching" (starting with really big waterbirds, which are easy to see). Actually, I might take her to PetSmart this weekend. I don't like those places, but she is so interested in parakeets right now ("They are green like frogs and have long long tails!") and I'm sure she'd love to see some real ones.

(As a side note, I was just reading somewhere about Gardner's theory of multiple intelligences and was intrigued to learn that the theory includes a "naturalist intelligence," which is all about being skilled at identifying, classifying and observing nature.)

grateful mother to DD, 1/04, and DS, 2/08

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#77 of 776 Old 09-16-2005, 07:52 PM
 
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You know, my mom is always telling me that my kids are not weird enough... :LOL I'd take it as a compliment, right up until the "You don't want her to be weird like that" comment, at which point I'd become snarky.

I'm proud to be a mamma to strange children!

People at the pool have been commenting on BeanBean's swimming ability a lot lately. I usually say something like, "he really loves the water!" but people just keep looking at him and then at me and Mike and I can see the gears working, trying to figure out how two obvoiously-out-of-shape parents got a kid who swims like a fish. It's kind of strange. Noone says, "wow, you must work with him a lot," because it's obviously not like he's being taught to be happy in the water. I've only had one person ask how we got him to do that, but we really didn't do anything so I didn't know what to say... It's odd. They have this really funny look when they watch him swim, I have no idea how to interpret it.... I'm not sure what to make of it all, it seems like a lot of fuss over something that I thought was pretty normal. I mean, ChibiChibi swam the first time she got into a swimming pool at 22 months, just like a little fish... I never had a problem with the water, and neither did Mike... it just seemed perfectly natural that our kids would be at ease in the water. BooBah doesn't swim as actively as BeanBean does, but people are shocked that she holds her breath and goes underwater eagerly, of her own accord. They don't watch her the way that they watch BeanBean, though.. like they're seeing something totally unheard of.... I'm a bit puzzled by it all.

Rynna, Mama to Bean (8), Boobah (6), Bella (4) and Bear (2)
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#78 of 776 Old 09-16-2005, 09:17 PM
 
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Originally Posted by loraxc
Some kids get obsessed with dinosaurs or contruction equipment and know all THEIR names, and people don't think that's weird, do they?
What do you think about the following, my 5 yo ds's current obsessions: the Chinese Zodiac and knowing the signs of everyone in the family as well as the birthstones of all our relatives and the countries/continents where these stones are most commonly mined? He is also in love with volcanoes, and he often assumes the role of a "guy who makes volcanoes" by crawling deep under the earth's crust and pushing up slowly to release the lava, which he alternately calls lava and strangely made up chemical sounding words? I am beginning to realize that when his mind is filled up with these ideas and he's obsessing about them, he is too busy to obsess about my death, poison, or any other anxiety-inducing ideas. So I am newly in love with his obsessions because they seem to keep him sane!
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#79 of 776 Old 09-17-2005, 09:04 AM
 
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Chinese Zodiac, eh? I actually find the "obsessions" kind of neat, and very interesting. DD's biggest one is definitely birds, but she also is very interested in:

Maps
Butterflies (we have a field guide for these also)
Snakes and frogs
Snails (and spirals, and anything with a "nested circle" shape)

Oh, and the (illustrated) pasta machine manual! (She likes to flip through it muttering, "Tagliatelle. Fettucini. Ravioli. Gnocchi. Spaghetti...")

Britishmum, :LOL at the fire extinguisher story!

grateful mother to DD, 1/04, and DS, 2/08

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#80 of 776 Old 09-17-2005, 12:09 PM
 
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My dds like the Chinese Zodiac signs as well. I suspect it has something to do with the fact that they are impressive animals (tiger and dragon) and can beat up mom and dad (a rat and a dog). :LOL
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#81 of 776 Old 09-18-2005, 02:32 AM
 
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Hi Ladies! I kind of introduced myself in an earlier message on labels. We have two DD's, our eldest is 4 and our youngest is 15 months. They are both so unique and special it's pretty incredible. It's fun to have a place where one can go and actually post about our children's advacements w/o people looking at us like we are putting on airs.

I've loved looking at the artwork some of your kids have done. I'm fascinated by children's art! I think children's art can be so expressive. I do have some questions for you all though. Our eldest is challenging in that she has the memory of an elaphant. She seems to have a bit of an eidetic memory. Now I think a lot of kids have this, but boy, it seems pretty pronounced in our little girl. So far it seems sound based, if she hears something once it's in her head forever. She's always been that way, making crazy connections since before she could talk (at 14 months old she went over to a fire-hydrant and signed water, though we never could figure out how she knew that. She didn't watch TV and we had never seen on in action in real life, maybe from a book?). But, all parents think their kids are really smart. I did though read somewhere that children can start to loose their capacity for memory around age 5. Does anyone have an references on that?

But, I digress. We recently have begun having some issues with artwork around our house. Our DD sees things in her head one way and tries to draw it, while she has exceptional fine motor skills she can't get it out exactly as it is in her head and this is incredibly frustrating for her. So frustrating in fact that she doesn't want to draw. She's become a perfectionist about it. Does anyone have any suggestions on how to best help her work through this? We've been going to museums with her for years and we talk about how everyone draws, paints, works with clay etc. differently and how all art is unique and seen through different etc.... nothing seems to work though. I feel very sad for her about it because it seems to effect her so deeply.

I don't have anything recent to share as far as her art goes because I do not have much need to scan it in, but here are some from just a few weeks after she turned 3; http://iraq.roothat.com/taji5/tajimywall2.jpg. She was big into writing (still is). And http://iraq.roothat.com/taji5/tajimywall3.jpg (This one has a picture she drew of her Daddy with a bucket, I can't remember what was in and going in the bucket though). She is still big into pottery as well.

I also find how kids obsess on things fascinating. Our eldest is currently obsessed with astronomy. She's big into following the phases of the moon and the earth's shadow and constellations. She looks to the sky almost every night to see if it is clear enough to get out our old telescope. She's also into vowels and 'silly silent e' and likes to find that silly e in the words of books we read. She learned about it last year when she was 3 and we were eating dinner at the 'Life Cafe'. She wanted to read the sign and we sounded out LIFE together and she told me I forgot a letter, the letter e, so I was sitting there having a conversation with our 3 year old about silent e. It was then I started worrying that I couldn't keep up with her. But, she has an imagination that blows my mind away. She went around the rest of the week saying she was a silent e and tried changing the sounds of words around.

Her younger sister has been _obsessed_ with books since just after she turned 1. You can read to her for hours and it still isn't enough. It's about the only time she will sit still too!

I'm interested to hear how others have handled these types of things.

Xaloxe
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#82 of 776 Old 09-18-2005, 09:54 AM
 
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Xaloxe,

That is wonderful artwork! Wrt to the perfectionism, I had to go in the other room when ds drew. If I were there, he'd either feel crowded or he'd express frustration that he couldn't do things, etc. I found that if I quietly went off in the other room, that he'd draw and draw. Most of the pictures I posted were drawn when I was in the other room; I had no idea he was doing it. I wonder if that would help?

As for obsessions, my oldest's outer space obsession isn't as strong as it used to be, but it's still present. He's getting into geography, so he loves GoogleEarth and maps. He also loves NASA's interactive planet setup.

He had a body obsession when he was 3. It started out as a bones obsession. We go to the chiropractor's and she was very kind to him, letting him hold her authentic human skull and showing him things on the spine model. Then, he learned about blood vessels and he became very interested in hearts and blood vessels. He drew lots of skeleton pictures and many of people with blood vessels. The most graphic one he drew was of a man with a hole in his torso, his skeleton laying next to him. He was mentally trying to process how they get a real human spine to make chiropractic models on. He still doesn't know about death, but he reasoned that they got it from a person who "doesn't talk anymore". The weird thing with this obession is that he gets incredibly freaked out by human body exhibits and books, even though he's obsessed with it. We once had to leave one, because they put a cowboy hat on their skeleton and it greatly upset him.

He still hasn't gone back to drawing. However, he's really into building toys right now and I think he has a hard time doing both. He really throws himself into things and lives/eats/breathes it, and so I think he has to drop art to do construction. He was very upset at bedtime last night, because he was hoping to make an excavator with his Meccano set. As soon as his little feet hit the floor this morning, he went to the Meccano set and began busily building. He's been there for over an hour. I'm not sure if he's even had breakfast.
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#83 of 776 Old 09-18-2005, 11:37 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Xaloxe, about the art frustrations, when my daughter was going through that I showed her studies of some of the art on our walls (Waterhouse). It helped her to see that even great artists don't get it perfect the first time and have to practice first before they make something. It wasn't a cure-all but it did help.
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#84 of 776 Old 09-18-2005, 01:34 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Cool, Britishmum! I printed out a certificate for Hollis.
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#85 of 776 Old 09-18-2005, 04:17 PM
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Xaloxe

My oldest dd sounds a lot like yours. Huge memory, early talker and reader, excellent fine motor skills, etc. And she too has a passion for art but gets frustrated with her attempts for it to come out right.

What has helped her is for me and others we know to show her our early works (kid art) as well as to attempt a very complex drawing only to have it not turn out right. Then I would explain to her that with every skill there is a learning curve, and even though gifted people can skip some parts of the curve to jump ahead, they still have to start near the bottom or middle before they can get to the top. There are many books on "How to teach your child to draw" and these show wonderful examples of kid art and its stages. My dd discovered that even though hers aren't where SHE wants them to be - they are well above the norm and she is improving all the time.

The other book my dd loves is called "Ish" by Peter Reynolds. It is about a boy who gives up drawing because his brother critisizes it. By the end he learns that things do not need to look perfect. It doesn't need to look like a vase of flowers, it only needs to be vase-ish.

After all art is an interpretation of your mood, the lighting, etc. not only realism.

I've given my dd many "assignments" from dot drawings, line drawings, tracing, digital photography, etc. She loves all of these. Even playdough has its art days and its just smoosh it days. After all some of these art materials are just FUN.
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#86 of 776 Old 09-19-2005, 02:44 AM
 
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Hello, everyone

I've been lurking off and on for a while. We have two boys, Noah who is 5 and 11/12s, thank you very much and Nathaniel 3 1/3. I've always known that they are bright kids, inquisitive, perceptive, aware ... Noah is an aural learner and will remember EVERYTHING you tell him (and he has a voluminous memory!) and Nathaniel is so quick with his wit.

I guess by way of introduction I'll share some of Noah and my bedtime ramblings. This one last week. Noah: "Mom, what's A-OK mean?" Me: a somewhat long-winded explanation of where the OK came from and that basically A-OK meant in some sense, the best. Noah: "then, Z-NotOK must be the worst." Me: "I suppose you could say so." Noah: "Then, A-NotOk and Z-OK must be the same" Me: "Oh, yeah!" He's in Grade Zero, which is what he calls Kindergarten. Preschool is Negative One (or Negative Two, in the case of his brother) He has refused to stand up for the pledge of allegience (public school public school public school) because he says it's not important, but really it's because he's being told to do something en masse and he is just not a group guy.

Last week Nathaniel and I were in the parking lot at the Farmer's Market and ran into an aquaintance. She commented on his "3-2-1 Blast-off!" T shirt, and shared that when she was a child she had a teacher named Mrs. Rocket, and that her hair was cone shaped. Without a seconds pause, Nathaniel states: "I had a teacher named Mrs. Car and she had wheels on her head!" and then, because we were standing next to a bin of corn he went on to "Mrs. Corn who had bumps (kernals) all over her body"

We moved back to the small town where Noah was born so he could "start" school here - although it's small (5000+) there is a goodly population of enlightened people. I had always thought that we would homeschool - I've agonized for years over what his experience in public school would be like - but he and I are so much alike that I haven't been convinced I would be able to be his best teacher. And his kindergarten teacher is a friend of mine, and AWESOME and yet and yet and yet I already know that he is going to be sooooooo bored and I don't know what quite to do.

Whew! this was a book, sorry! but when I tell people about the conversations Noah and I have they look at me like I have three not just two heads and it's good to share with people who will just laugh knowingly.

Oh, yeah - Noah is 3 1/2 and just self-toilet trained. He is fascinated by the availability of his penis. We're driving on the highway and a convertible goes by. He says: "A convertible is something that changes, right?" "Yes" I acknowledge. He says with GREAT glee "My penis is a convertible!!" I just about ran off the road I was laughing so hard.

thanks for listening

Barbara, tired, but exceptionally grateful mama
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#87 of 776 Old 09-19-2005, 06:28 PM
 
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*
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#88 of 776 Old 09-19-2005, 08:37 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by m&m
The other book my dd loves is called "Ish" by Peter Reynolds. It is about a boy who gives up drawing because his brother critisizes it. By the end he learns that things do not need to look perfect. It doesn't need to look like a vase of flowers, it only needs to be vase-ish.
Thanks for the book suggestion - my DD has a pretty strong perfectionism streak in her (three guesses if anyone else in her family has it too ), and this sounds like something that might be good for me to look for in the library.
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#89 of 776 Old 09-20-2005, 06:57 AM
 
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oh, bless your hearts for commiseration and the recommendation for the book called Ish. I will find this book. We were just in tears here this morning over this.

mama to DS 9 and DD 5 and
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#90 of 776 Old 09-20-2005, 04:30 PM
 
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"A convertible is something that changes, right?" "Yes" I acknowledge. He says with GREAT glee "My penis is a convertible!!"
Barbara,
Absolutely adorable stories about your boys! Thanks for sharing!

About the mother whose dd is a perfectionist and can't draw what she wants to, I just want to say that soooo many artists are the same way as adults too. Picasso threw away more paintings than what he showed b/c they weren't good enough in his opinion, and there are many other masters who did the same thing. Perhaps after much practice and sketches and trials she will be able to put what is in her mind onto the paper/board/canvas/whatever medium she wants to work in, and perhaps not. But is there any way she can accept her limitations as such and then work with what talent she has now? The process of art is just as important as the final piece. Are you able to teach your dd that the *process* is important, not just the finished product or the accolades from same? I feel that if an artist can enjoy the process and not *judge* the product, then she will learn a great lesson for her lifetime and enjoy her creativitymore. Living with and growing up in a family of and being a tortured artist, I share with you my personal life's lesson.
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