Addressing the Special Needs of Gifted Children, #6 - Page 5 - Mothering Forums

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#121 of 776 Old 10-02-2005, 11:33 PM
 
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Ah, spelling. I also refused to do the invented spelling thing; it's a good thing for me that my mother never insisted on it. She simply handed me a dictionary, and we both moved on. :LOL When I was started second grade in a private school with two other second graders, my mother chose a spelling book which she felt was appropriate for me (Spelling Workout G). One of the other second graders was also given that book, and the other took spelling with the first graders (we were a mixed class, five first graders and three second graders ). My mother also invented a science course for us out of whole cloth. That was actually a pretty decent year for me.. if only they could have kept challenging me in Hebrew.... :LOL

Most of my spelling was actually learned from reading. I read all the time, and I just remembered the way that the words were spelled most of the time. I'm much less anal about spelling now than I was as a child, though I will admit to correcting spelling in my personal journal when I have the time.

Rynna, Mama to Bean (8), Boobah (6), Bella (4) and Bear (2)
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#122 of 776 Old 10-03-2005, 12:01 AM
 
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#123 of 776 Old 10-03-2005, 01:26 AM
 
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Isisjade- I totally commisserate on having the "odd" kid in the group. We've been doing kindermusic with my dd who is 3, and I am hating it. She's happy to be there, but heaven knows she does what she wants to- not necessarily what the class is doing. Part of the problem is that I know she finds the class just a little dull, we sing the same songs over and over, I know the goal is for the kids to learn the words and such, but my dd isn't interested anymore by the 3rd time. I'm working hard to get over my desires for her to look normal to everyone else- whatever that is.

Its things like this that also make me think homeschooling, at least in the early grades is what I need to do. I don't want her labled a problem child, just because she's not like the other kids.

Laura, Mama to Mya 7/02, Ian 6/07 and Anna 8/09
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#124 of 776 Old 10-03-2005, 01:44 AM
 
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I got a wonderful email back from DD's teacher tonight. Here is part of what she wrote to me:

Quote:
What I want to give xxx is the freedom to express herself without the worry of conventional spelling-- a worry which often inhibits young children from the process of writing. However, unlike her kindergarten peers, xxx has had quite a bit of exposure to print and is a successful reader. When she is writing, I can "conference" with her and we can talk about conventional spelling while continuing to focus on her ideas. Between allowing her the freedom to let her ideas flow, and then looking at her work together (revising), I think we can find a balance that will feel right to her.
She also included an article that had appeared in Mothering on the topic of invented spelling. She's a gem.
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#125 of 776 Old 10-03-2005, 09:53 AM
 
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I'm working hard to get over my desires for her to look normal to everyone else- whatever that is.
Me, too...

I know that other people have the same "my kid sticks out" feeling, but it still helps to hear about it. Maybe all parents feel like their kid is the odd one out at times. I know we all must be much more conscious of our own DC's behavior than we are of others, right? Still, I don't feel like I was imagining that DD was sticking out. The other kids are all down on the floor playing trains and DD is sitting in a chair, reciting a (longish) book we have at home, looking around, hoping that we will join in with her, as we do at home....

The group craft at this party involved having the parents apply fabric paint to the kids' hands; the kids were supposed to make handprints on fabric. DD thought this was a horrible idea and just wanted to get at the paint (she LOVES paint) and do her own thing. Meanwhile all the other kids were peacefully allowing their parents to hold onto their hands and make prints. Ha ha. DD still has fabric paint all in her hair from trying to get away and do her thing.

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#126 of 776 Old 10-03-2005, 10:19 AM
 
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Originally Posted by loraxc
Ha ha. DD still has fabric paint all in her hair from trying to get away and do her thing.
LOL That sounds just like my kid!! I never do crafts with her anymore, because she never follows the directions, and its always a huge mess. I feel guilty that we don't do more, but it also keeps me sane. We only paint when I have a bath planned as the next activity.

I do think you are right that all parents worry about their kids acting "like they are supposed to". But look around the next time you go to one of these things- there's probably a kid hitting another one, a mom trying to get her toddler to act "perfect"- in a way that's not age appropriate, and a few other parents who are stressing because their toddlers aren't useing spoons and are covered in icecream. I've taken to looking at these activities as going well if my child has not hurt any other kids (not a real problem for us, but some parents have that issue), has not had a screaming temper tantrum, and has enjoyed the activity, even if she didn't enjoy it in the same way that others did.

I would much rather have the kid that appears to be gifted, is reciting a book and sitting nicely, than the kid that is hitting the other kids and chasing them around with a bat.

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#127 of 776 Old 10-03-2005, 08:37 PM
 
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Originally Posted by teachma
I hear you on the perfectionistic spelling thing. When he was about 4, I began to have my now 5 year old ds make his friends' birthday cards. I remember one time, he wrote "HAPEE BRTHDA CLOWEE (Chloe)" and asked me how his spelling was. I said something like, "That is just right for someone learning how to spell." He immediately said, "Well which word is wrong?" followed by "How would someone who already knows how to spell write them" When we telll stories orally, he has an amazing imagination and uses words he wouldn't begin to attempt to write himself at this point! I worry that, even as he progresses to second, third grade, his imagination and his vocabulary will far surpass his writing and spelling abilities...but maybe when he begins reading more extensively, he will be able to strike a balance. I also like the dictionary idea!
Ok, this is my 4 year old DD exactly!!! She's really stuck on being accurate. The past year when she was 3 and in a play based pre-school she would write her teachers letters all the time. She would ask how to spell words and I would tell her and she would write it. Now she's learning to read and with it has come trying to write on her own without assistance. She gets so frustrated when she writes words and asks us if they were correct. We read 'Eet' and say it says 'eat' and she asks if she wrote it correctly.

She's also been writing upside down, reversing words; making signs on the driveway in sidewalk chalk that say 'ON' with a picture of a car beneath it. I read it and she said no mom you need to be upside down to read it, it says no parking. I have to laugh at that.
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#128 of 776 Old 10-04-2005, 12:02 PM
 
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Originally Posted by OTMomma

I would much rather have the kid that appears to be gifted, is reciting a book and sitting nicely, than the kid that is hitting the other kids and chasing them around with a bat.
My ds is BOTH of these kids rolled into one hugely needy child! And you think YOU worry about how you kids come across...
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#129 of 776 Old 10-04-2005, 12:15 PM
 
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:LOL teachma-

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#130 of 776 Old 10-04-2005, 10:16 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Britishmum
dd finally got a stamp on her hand last week after over a year of acting like the teacher was going to cut her fingers off whenever she got out the hand stamps. She was sooooo proud of herself and excited - and she's now five years old! Heck, all the two year olds go and get their hands stamped. Why is everything such a big deal to our kids? Sometimes I just want to be a normal mum who takes these things for granted........................
Yeah, that. Ds, also 5, allowed face paint for the first time in his life this past summer! Imagine my surprise when I picked him up from camp and noticed the colorful smear on his cheek. At every fair, every birthday party, there was NO WAY he wanted anyone to come near him with that makeup on a q-tip. Of course, on this particular occasion, he had a justification for having permitted the paint: it was part of a game the counselors were playing with them. He needed to find as many hiding counselors out in the bushes, and for each one he found, he received a different colored line on his face. The object was to get as many lines as possible. I always thought it was a sensory thing, but now I'm thinking maybe he just didn't ever really see the point of having a temporary design painted on his face...neither do I, I guess!
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#131 of 776 Old 10-04-2005, 11:39 PM
 
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DD is a lot younger but she made such an issue about the stamps at Gymboree, they looked at me like *I* was doing something to scare her! Finally she will go and get them herself, she watched for weeks and then decided it was ok and she wanted to do it.

On another note DD who is 20.5 mo today will not let me read to her, she wants to sit and 'read' the book herself, but she will let me read a new (usually library book) the first time. She will occupy herself a long time looking at books and pointing out things, and saying the words and objects she knows, but she is very bored with all her board books (pardon the pun) and am having a hard time finding books to interest her, she likes a beautifully illustrated book of The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe, and will point things out and ask whats that for me to name things (useful terms like Faun, and Centaur...) and Giddy Up Lets Ride by Flora McDonald and a book about Old McDonald had a farm, which is not in board format and has a lot of very good and detailed illustrations. She has basically memorized a lot of her board books at this point, and flips to what she is interested in in each one, then closes it.

I am really looking for some suggestions of books to interest her that are for a little older kids but she could relate to and enjoy (or some great ones for her age group) I got Chicka Chicka Boom Boom out of the library and she likes that. I am not too worried about her not letting me read to her as I think she will want me to read stories soon enough, but would like to find some books she and I can enjoy together.

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#132 of 776 Old 10-05-2005, 01:10 AM
 
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Originally Posted by OTMomma
I would much rather have the kid that appears to be gifted, is reciting a book and sitting nicely, than the kid that is hitting the other kids and chasing them around with a bat.
:LOL I'm not sure. BeanBean doesn't always appear gifted just... resourceful, I guess. Today I took the kids to a really cool aquarium in the Mall of America. At the end of the tour, there's a tank for the kids to pet some of the critters. I held BeanBean up so that he could touch some rays and sharks and things, and then I put him down and picked up his sister. BeanBean looked around for a moment, and the next thing I knew I heard a loud, heavy scrape-- he had pulled a huge metal bench from against a wall all the way over to the tank so that he could stand on it and reach in and pet the critters himself! The other parents were just floored by it, and the woman who was directing said, "In all the time I've been working here, I've never seen a child do that." I just said, "He's quite the problem solver." What else can you say to that?! He's definately *different* though, in so many ways. :LOL

Rynna, Mama to Bean (8), Boobah (6), Bella (4) and Bear (2)
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#133 of 776 Old 10-05-2005, 10:53 AM
 
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Originally Posted by eilonwy
... I heard a loud, heavy scrape-- he had pulled a huge metal bench from against a wall all the way over to the tank so that he could stand on it and reach in and pet the critters himself!
Do you have stools and the like at home? See, both of my children would defnitely do something like this! In our case, I would assume it's because, on each level of my home, we have a step stool that we have encouraged both kids to use to reach what they need. I guess I taught them to be resurceful- wow, I never thought of it that way! I encouraged independence with certain things at a very young age. If ds was 2.5 years old and thirsty, but I was busy or in the shower or something, he could use a stool to reach a cup, then drag the stool over to the sink, turn on the water, and fill up the cup. People would marvel at his functioning at such a young age, but it was something I taught him to do. Interesting paradox or something; could get his own drink at that age, but I was still nursing him!
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#134 of 776 Old 10-05-2005, 11:06 AM
 
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I have spent almost all of my energy on this board talking about things related to my ds, and I am always joking around at home about my "poor, neglected dd" because life seems to revolve completely around her big brother...but dd has become quite an amazement in recent weeks. Whereas she did not speak fifteen different words at 6 months like her brother (for her, it was more like 11 or even 12 mos. before she had a vocabulary ofthat size) she is now speaking in sentences varying in length from 3 to seven words! At the grocery store recently she put together two ideas that shee knows, "I need it" and "Go home" for a combined, "I need it go home, Mommy!" because she wanted to leave the store. I am back in that position where people react in shcok when they hear she has only just turned 18 months old. Again, I have said this in passing, I don't think she will wind up being gifted. She isn't quite as scary with her abilities as ds was, just advanced. She just seems to be so capable, so "together" in every sense of the word, and maybe a gifted talker like her mama! What she has that ds never did: phenomenal fine motor skills, patience, awesome social abilities (and the desire to play with other kids!). I guess one could be gifted and still exhibit these attributes, but it didn't work that way with #1.

Speaking of which, Oct 23 and 30th are the two official dates for ds's testing. I may need to be booted off this board if the scores don't confirm he's actually gifted. Don't you all ever have doubts?
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#135 of 776 Old 10-05-2005, 11:35 AM
 
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Originally Posted by teachma
Speaking of which, Oct 23 and 30th are the two official dates for ds's testing. I may need to be booted off this board if the scores don't confirm he's actually gifted. Don't you all ever have doubts?
Teachma!
If your sons tests comes back saying he is not 'gifted' that doesn't mean he isn't advanced. This is part of the reason why I hate labels! Your son is gifted, and while the test may help him in a schooling environment it doesn't define him. Your son has interests and knowlegde beyond that of his average peers and that is always going to offer it's unique challenges to you (test or no test). You should always be able to come here to share ideas on the challenges faced with keeping up with him. I'd doubt the test before I doubted what I know of my child.

I was speaking with my mom on what defined a child as gifted. She said that our eldest wasn't gifted, that she was advanced but not gifted. If she was gifted she'd be composing symphonies or doing advanced algebra. While she has an ear for music, can read and write upper case and lower case, understands simple math concepts (addition, subtraction and base multiplication) and seems generally to just 'get' everything the first time it's explained she isn't ready for highschool or college (my mother's definition of a gifted 4 year old based on her experience as a teacher and a degree in child development). Our DD is still a kid.

Everyone has their own idea on what giftedness is. Even our gifted or advanced children aren't the same. And if they're not, their still our wonderful challenging children. A test wouldn't change the fact that when someone says to DD "look at the sunset" she feels the need to explain to them that the sun doesn't really "set" that the earth "rotates around it making you think it does silly". Or that she thinks she needs to explain to people a shooting star is not really a star (she seems caught up in our language explaining things innacuratly.) No matter what your sons test says, it isn't going to change who is he or how you work with him, or how many times you have to explain to people who seem baffled by his knowledge that he just understands things.
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#136 of 776 Old 10-05-2005, 12:17 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Destinye
I am really looking for some suggestions of books to interest her that are for a little older kids but she could relate to and enjoy (or some great ones for her age group) I got Chicka Chicka Boom Boom out of the library and she likes that. I am not too worried about her not letting me read to her as I think she will want me to read stories soon enough, but would like to find some books she and I can enjoy together.
I know I have lots of suggestions but only a few are coming to my brain right now... you said she likes beautifully illustrated books. I would suggest the "Butterfly Alphabet" - pictures of real butterfly wings with the appearance of letters from our alphabet in them. DD loved to take this to our local butterfly exhibit and try to match up butterflies from the pictures. It seems your DD would be into seek and find type of books (like I-spy) but DD LOVES "Fairy Dreams". Gorgeous illustrations, some of the objects are a little hard to spot but it's so beautiful! She also had a more simple book "The Everything Book" that she really liked a number of the pages on, it's not a book to 'read' per say but has a page for different facial expressions, one for the alphabet, some child rhymes etc..
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#137 of 776 Old 10-05-2005, 12:40 PM
 
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Originally Posted by teachma
I have spent almost all of my energy on this board talking about things related to my ds, and I am always joking around at home about my "poor, neglected dd" because life seems to revolve completely around her big brother...but dd has become quite an amazement in recent weeks.
I know that I do the same -- my older dd is the one who I generally think of as gifted. My little one is just so much easier to parent and doesn't have the same personality quirks that often go with giftedness. However, I am starting to wonder if I, too, have been underestimating her. She is the youngest in her kindergarten class (just turned 5 last week) and, while I knew that she wouldn't be floundering b/c she is a bright kid, I have been kind of surprised at how well she is doing.

She came home with a little paper on which they were practicing "t"s and "t" words yesterday and she had written the names for the pictures on the paper -- "televisin" (television) and "tipriter" (typewriter) which was actually pretty impressive to me. I didn't expect her to get such long words so close to accurate, even if not totally correct. I saw some of the other kids' work b/c they were all dragging stuff out of their backpacks and waiving it at us mommies and it was more like "trt" for typewriter.

Likewise, I knew that she could read fairly easy stuff and did think that they were giving her too easy of take home books (stuff like: Up, up, up. Down, down, down. I can fly.) Her teacher seemed to catch onto this last week and I was glad to see that she was getting more difficult books, but was surprised with how long of a book she came home with the other day (4-5 long sentences/page) and she read it all to me easily.

I think that it can be easy to let the more obviously challenging child overshadow the easier kid.

I haven't had either of my girls formally tested, though, so I can't show actual test score to prove their giftedness. You won't get booted off if your kids aren't geniuses :LOL -- mine may not be either!
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#138 of 776 Old 10-05-2005, 01:18 PM
 
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Originally Posted by xaloxe
I know I have lots of suggestions but only a few are coming to my brain right now... you said she likes beautifully illustrated books. I would suggest the "Butterfly Alphabet" - pictures of real butterfly wings with the appearance of letters from our alphabet in them. DD loved to take this to our local butterfly exhibit and try to match up butterflies from the pictures. It seems your DD would be into seek and find type of books (like I-spy) but DD LOVES "Fairy Dreams". Gorgeous illustrations, some of the objects are a little hard to spot but it's so beautiful! She also had a more simple book "The Everything Book" that she really liked a number of the pages on, it's not a book to 'read' per say but has a page for different facial expressions, one for the alphabet, some child rhymes etc..
Thanks! I bet she might love that, as she loves butterflies and is actually totally obssessed with fairies. We went to the local wildlife Rescue and there were lions and tigers roaring a few feet away and she yelled "FAIRY!!" and had to sit at the pool and point out the fairy statue the rest of the time, the poor lions were history! I am going to check out Fairy Dreams for sure.

We actually used to have The Everything Book on permanent loan from the library and she DID like it a lot!

Great intuition here! I will check out the Butterfly and Fairy books, I have an Amazon gift certificate too!

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#139 of 776 Old 10-05-2005, 01:19 PM
 
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#140 of 776 Old 10-05-2005, 01:27 PM
 
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Originally Posted by isisjade
Yes. We are starting the testing process in November, and I would be pretty shocked (enough to question the testing process/tester) if he wasn't identified as gifted on some level; yet, I still do entertain the thought that I could be completely wrong. And I would feel pretty much an idiot, but somehow, I do not think this is the fate for either you or me. I can't wait to hear how it goes.
Sorry if I missed your original posts on this matter, but are you both having your kids tested through their schools? Did you just request that the gifted coordinator test them? If so, did you need to give some justification for why you wanted the testing done (i.e. - explain what you planned to do differently or wanted them to do differently in response to the potential results)?
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#141 of 776 Old 10-05-2005, 02:12 PM
 
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Destinye, our DDs are about the same age. She's pretty much "over" most of her board books now too, and prefers something with a little more to it. Here are some of her favorites:

In the Night Kitchen (such an odd book, but kids all seem to love it)
McElligot's Pool, One Fish, Two Fish, and Green Eggs and Ham
Beatrix Potter--the real, unabridged ones; these are just a joy to read aloud for me.
Field guides, especially photographic ones with one animal per page; she loves to study them and learn the names.
The I Spy books--not the board books, but the next level up, for young readers. These are great for keeping her busy for some time, because she needs to find each item, and it's not as easy as the board books were.
Richard Scarry books--Cars and Trucks and Things that Go, Best Word Book Ever. These don't have storylines as much, but they are ALL about naming, detailed pictures, and learning new words.
The Mercer Mayer Little Critter books--I'm not as crazy about these, but she seems to find them emotionally compelling, as they really focus on a child and his behavior and relationships, in very kid-like ways.

She also likes poetry. Nursery rhyme and "folk rhyme" books are very popular, and she's also been liking Now We Are Six (AA Milne).


DD is really interested in words that sound like other words and phrases that include the same word as other phrases right now. Yesterday she was looking through her beloved bird book, and saw a bird called an American oystercatcher.

"Oystercatcher. American oystercatcher. American. Cheese! American CHEESE!"

:LOL

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#142 of 776 Old 10-05-2005, 03:37 PM
 
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#143 of 776 Old 10-05-2005, 04:13 PM
 
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Eilonwy - HELP! This is totally off track but I need to ask you a question. I've been experimenting with blogging and set up a blog to chronicle Sam's artwork. I'd like to keep it open for comments, but do you know if there is a way to keep blog spammers out? I've gotten 8 comments or so, but they're all spam.....yuck....I'd really appreciate it if you could help!

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#144 of 776 Old 10-05-2005, 05:07 PM
 
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ChristaN, we are testing privately following the suggestion of the private therapist ds has been seeing for anxiety/ocd since June. She feels it is possible that he has an excess of mental/intellectual energy that, if not channelled, leaves a "space" in his mind for lots of worrying about ridiculous things (read: everything!) I know this to be at least partiaclly true because if I keep us crazy-busy all the time, the anxiety is at a low level, but on "down days" it is miserable. Our public school has a 3X week pull-out gifted program, and I am not sure in which grade it begins. Nonetheless, if ds encounters problems later in the year and isn't thriving as he is, fortunately, so far, I know that (as a public school educator myself) someone at that school will need to do some accomodating for him. So I am hoping to get the test results, confirm what we think we know about ds, and then put the papers aside for a rainy day...As long as he's happy at school, I am not going to make any waves, and I trust myself to supplement his learning at home if I feel he's not being adequately challenged there.
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#145 of 776 Old 10-06-2005, 12:22 AM
 
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Originally Posted by loraxc
Destinye, our DDs are about the same age. She's pretty much "over" most of her board books now too, and prefers something with a little more to it. Here are some of her favorites:

In the Night Kitchen (such an odd book, but kids all seem to love it)
McElligot's Pool, One Fish, Two Fish, and Green Eggs and Ham
Beatrix Potter--the real, unabridged ones; these are just a joy to read aloud for me.
Field guides, especially photographic ones with one animal per page; she loves to study them and learn the names.
The I Spy books--not the board books, but the next level up, for young readers. These are great for keeping her busy for some time, because she needs to find each item, and it's not as easy as the board books were.
Richard Scarry books--Cars and Trucks and Things that Go, Best Word Book Ever. These don't have storylines as much, but they are ALL about naming, detailed pictures, and learning new words.
The Mercer Mayer Little Critter books--I'm not as crazy about these, but she seems to find them emotionally compelling, as they really focus on a child and his behavior and relationships, in very kid-like ways.

She also likes poetry. Nursery rhyme and "folk rhyme" books are very popular, and she's also been liking Now We Are Six (AA Milne).


DD is really interested in words that sound like other words and phrases that include the same word as other phrases right now. Yesterday she was looking through her beloved bird book, and saw a bird called an American oystercatcher.

"Oystercatcher. American oystercatcher. American. Cheese! American CHEESE!"

:LOL
Thanks for the great suggestions! I actually read this before I had to rush out (DD urgently needed to go to the park!) and picked up an I Spy which she seems to like so far! Great idea as she loves to point things out, and learn new words right now.

I grew up in UK and learned to read on Beatrix Potter so consequently could not wait to read them to DD, who so far is not interested lol! In fact one of my earliest memories is when I was 2.5 years and my sister was born and my father read Peter Rabbit and Squirrel Nutkin every day. I recall it so well because my mother was ill (eclampsia) and she was in hospital for 6 weeks which must have been a shock at that age for me, anyhow have very fond memories of Beatrix Potter! Recently I saw a very interesting video biography of her and her life in the Lake District.

I have never heard of In the Night Kitchen but will check it out, and loved AA Milne growing up and read all the original books. I notice she does like Mother Goose type poems now and just have a tiny book of them so maybe will find a really good collection with nice illustrations for her.

Who stole my signature!
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#146 of 776 Old 10-06-2005, 10:32 AM
 
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Hey everyone,

I just wanted to pop in to say hi! I haven't posted much lately but I do check in every couple of days, I'm glad to hear everyone is doing well and that all the kiddos are adjusting well in the new schoolyear!

Not much new with us. Sam started preschool two days a week and really seemed to like it the first couple of days, but as soon as the novelty wore off he started saying he didn't like it and didn't want to go. He seems really sad when I pick him up and when I ask him if he played with toys, ran around in the activity room ect... he says no because the kids just grab his toys away or that there are too many kids and it's too loud ect... I had a chat with his teacher and she pretty much confirmed all this but said it's normal, especially for three year olds. The school is pretty non academic and they're focusing on learning about the seasons and months of the year right now. I'm torn as to what to do, since we're homeschooling him he really doesn't NEED nursery school, I just figured this was the only year he could go just for the socialization of it and they wouldn't be worrying about academics, kwim? On the plus side, he's been cleaning up his toys unprompted more at home and tonight he introduced himself to a little girl at the playground all on his own and then introduced her to his cousin and explained his new gingerbread man game and invited her to play it with him, so that was nice to see! He's had a minor development in his artwork too. He's been drawing dinosaurs as of late, but instead of just drawing a head and adding eyes and a mouth, he draws the eyes and mouth as part of the shape of the head, you can check them out here at our blog:

http://thevirtualfridge.blogspot.com/

His perfectionism has suddenly increased however and he's even taken to hiding pictures that he doesn't want anyone to see, it's a little heartbreaking for me, I'm obviously not doing a very good job of helping him overcome this and I'm just at a loss as to what to do.

We're still at the same place with reading, he can sound out any 3 letter word and read simple sentences and books, but still no intense desire to learn, so we just practice when the mood strikes.

So anyway, that's all, I'll try to pop in more often!

Jenn
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#147 of 776 Old 10-06-2005, 06:49 PM
 
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Jen-- I'm sorry, I've been getting spam comments too lately and I've got no idea how to prevent them. It's on my list of "things to research when I'm at the ILs and have reliable, high-speed internet access." *sigh*

Quote:
Or that she thinks she needs to explain to people a shooting star is not really a star (she seems caught up in our language explaining things innacuratly.)
This is just so funny to me, I was *exactly* the same way as a child and I still have issues with this. :LOL If I'm not feeling totally level, innaccurate language can drive me absolutely nuts.

Stepstools-- we have one stepstool which *I* need to use to reach things (I'm short :LOL). BeanBean has been using it for ages, which is why it didn't strike me as particularly odd that he dragged the bench over. The bench was very heavy, but he's a very strong, muscular kid. I think people were more surprised at the audacity of it than anything else. It's one thing to use a stepstool to reach the bathroom sink at home to get a drink, but another thing entirely to move a large bench in a public building, kwim?

Do I ever worry that the kids aren't technically gifted? Sometimes. But then I think, if they don't test as gifted on one or two partucular days, what does that actually mean? It could mean any number of things. Maybe the kids were too tired, or hungry, or maybe the tester just didn't like them for some reason. I took an IQ test when I was 5 years old; the tester stopped asking questions at 129-- one point shy of the gifted program. It had nothing to do with my intelligence at all and everything to do with the fact that it was August and I had a dark tan. I looked hispanic, and that particular school didn't believe that hispanic children or black children belonged in their precious gifted program, or even in the highest level classes, so the tester made sure that I wouldn't qualify. When I tested again at 12, I hit the cieling of the WISC-IV (160) on less than four hours of sleep and without eating breakfast or lunch on two of the three testing days (on the second day, the tester made me promise to eat *something* for lunch aside from iced tea, so I had a sandwich). The tester was shocked, and kept telling me that he wished I'd eat something and get more sleep-- he really wanted to see what I could do, but he couldn't really complain because there wasn't anymore that he could test with the forms that he had. He liked me. :LOL

Anyway, my point: there are many many things which can affect the outcome of an IQ test. It's almost impossible to achieve a falsely high score on an IQ test, but it's very easy to achieve an artificially low score; the younger the person taking the test, the easier it is to achieve a false low. So don't worry about it-- we're not going to kick you off of this board if your kid scores 125. :LOL

Rynna, Mama to Bean (8), Boobah (6), Bella (4) and Bear (2)
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#148 of 776 Old 10-06-2005, 08:09 PM
 
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AH HA! To cut down on spam in your blog comments you can choose "Yes" for the setting "Word Verification" in the settings for comments. On the downside it will require people leaving comments to do a word verification, but it should cut down on mass spam .

Jenn
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#149 of 776 Old 10-06-2005, 09:44 PM
 
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Originally Posted by luvmypoonchkie
His perfectionism has suddenly increased however and he's even taken to hiding pictures that he doesn't want anyone to see, it's a little heartbreaking for me, I'm obviously not doing a very good job of helping him overcome this and I'm just at a loss as to what to do.
Jenn,
I posted about this same thing (I think in response to you earlier in the thread) and I got some good suggestions that worked for our DD. You can go back and read them if you want but in a nutshell:

Two books: "Ish" and "The Dot" really hit home with DD

Going to the art museum and comparing similiar works done by different artists (how one artist sees a tree versus others, or people, or animals or colors).

Giving her some space to color alone was a good suggestion, but after we did the above it wasn't near as bad. She has gone back to drawing after refusing for awhile because her art was never good enough.
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#150 of 776 Old 10-06-2005, 10:06 PM
 
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Britishmum, we really do have the same kid! We had a massive perfectionism meltdown yesterday as well; I'd say it lasted 30-45 minutes, and I got kicked in the process! Ds was thrashing as well as crying so hard and screaming so vigorously that he was coughing and almost choking, seeming like he was going to vomit. Ours was the result of a drawng he wanted to add above a sentence he wrote to explain what he did on his days off from school during Rosh Hashanah. On the bottom of the paper, he had written "I went too tempul." He wanted to draw a very specific picture to match- he described it as a bunch of square boxes in a row, each with a slightly different-looking shofar in it. (The shofar is the ram's horn, sounded to welcome the Jewish New Year.) Needless to say at this point, he could not draw the picture exactly as he had it in his mind...the worst freak-out to date. But his writing was so beautiful now that he's using lowercase letters, and his fine motor skills are so much better, and I was so proud of him for initiating this project independently because he usually stays away from writing...

Fortunately we, too, are having an amazing school year. I keep thinking, Has it really been a whole month that he's been in kindergarten without any social or other major negative issues? Sooo much better than last year. Can it last?
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