Addressing the Special Needs of Gifted Children, #7 - Mothering Forums

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#1 of 364 Old 12-14-2005, 12:13 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Maybe we should really just start a new thread every month, instead of having ones with over 800 posts?

All with Gifted Kids (or you think they might be gifted) are welcome to come hang with us!

Laura, Mama to Mya 7/02, Ian 6/07 and Anna 8/09
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#2 of 364 Old 12-14-2005, 12:23 AM
 
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wow a new thread....I am a newbie to this thread....I was too overwhelmed by the last to jump in!

Well I think my dd is gifted or at least really smart. She is only 2.5 so I'll see how she continues to develop. So far she is really well rounded in her development and especially creative with an extra good memory. I am noticing other people noticing how smart she is which is confirming my suspicions that she is well above average.

I look forward to learning more from all of you....I really want to do my best to nurture who she is.
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#3 of 364 Old 12-14-2005, 02:23 AM
 
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Subscribing to the thread! I posted an introduction at the end of the last thread but I'm too tired to retype the whole thing now. Looking forward to getting to know everyone!
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#4 of 364 Old 12-14-2005, 04:16 AM
 
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I'm enjoying the conversation too!
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#5 of 364 Old 12-14-2005, 10:37 AM
 
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Hi, Velveteen.

Subscribing. Also wanted to quickly brag about dd. (Since I am always talking about ds...) Last night, I was counting for ds to see how quickly he could do something (counting motivates him) and I stopped at 8. Dd continued counting where I left off, all the way to 20. I never knew she could count past 10! She hasn't been "taught," but obviously picked it up. Now, I realize that some of the profoundly gifted kids have been doing this from a year old, or maybe even earlier, but at 20.5 months old, she is far ahead of the "norm," I think. And this is where I find it so hard for my kids to fit in. I can't compare them with the super-gifted, but thinking about them in relation to the regular just doesn't work for us either. Are there any more kids like this around?
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#6 of 364 Old 12-14-2005, 11:41 AM
 
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Originally Posted by teachma
Hi, Velveteen.

Subscribing. Also wanted to quickly brag about dd. (Since I am always talking about ds...) Last night, I was counting for ds to see how quickly he could do something (counting motivates him) and I stopped at 8. Dd continued counting where I left off, all the way to 20. I never knew she could count past 10! She hasn't been "taught," but obviously picked it up. Now, I realize that some of the profoundly gifted kids have been doing this from a year old, or maybe even earlier, but at 20.5 months old, she is far ahead of the "norm," I think. And this is where I find it so hard for my kids to fit in. I can't compare them with the super-gifted, but thinking about them in relation to the regular just doesn't work for us either. Are there any more kids like this around?

I thinkthis is my dd...not profoundly gifted but pretty exceptional...then again, whose to say? Her learning follows such an odd pattern. She is also well rounded though her motor skills are a bit behind..can't jump yet and is pretty slow on stairs. I like it here because I learn so much about how they learn and how to deal with other people.

My dd just moved up to the preschool room at preschool from the toddler room(her first early advancement ) and is the youngest there...she fits in quite a bit better with those kids even though she looks so tiny...she is by far the youngest there, all the others are 3 and up but she is quite ready. She's one of the few that can put her shoes on the right feet

Sophia stood out quite a bit in the classroom of kids her age. She was the same age as many of them but the difference was obvious.

I posted on the other thread about her tantrums and the difficulty I have been having.

So here is how yesterday went. She got up and nursed. Then we had a long talk about waiting. I explained what "waiting" meant and that Martina needed to nurse first and be taken care of because she didn't understand waiting and that she would cry if left to wait because she can't understand but that she was bigger and maybe she could wait a few minutes for me to finish nursing Martina or taking care of her.

I also didn't turn on the tv all day and around 4pm I got Sophia a snack and a drink and turned on Dora for half an hour...and Iwas nursing baby and Sophia wanted more drink. I said you have to wait, Martina is nursing and when she 's done I will get you a drink. Well of course she started to whine and get upset and I said "remember how we talked about waiting and that you are bigger and can wait a little but I will get you what you need as soon as I can" so she turned back to the tv and continued to watch Dora. Now I was not sure that she actually understood and was waiting like I said or if something on Dora actually got her attention but anyway I continued nursing Martina and then I burped her and laid her in the bouncy seat and immediately Sophia turns around "may I have my drink now" and I was "yes, that's why I put Martina down, to go get your drink now" and she was so happy and I said "that was very good waiting, you were very patient" and she said "what is patient?" and I said "it's when you can wait a while without getting upset" So I got her drink and all was well.

And that was the only sign of a tantrum the entire day! I also had squeezed a nap in there too. She went to bed easily...my older dd watched baby so I could read and nurse her to sleep. She had a very happy day!!!

I think I really need to talk to her more and explain things to her before hand. I always did this but haven't much lately. I have been busy.

I don't always expect her to wait and be patient but along with being well fed and rested and understanding what it is I think it will get a bit better.
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#7 of 364 Old 12-14-2005, 01:05 PM
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I introduced myself a long time ago on a previous thread, but thought a re-introduction was in order.

Hello, I am Monique a gifted person, with a gifted brother and father, wife to a gifted husband, and mother to two gifted daughters. Sounds odd I know, but hey gifted people tend to get along well, and genetics plays a big role.

anyhow...

My oldest is 6.5 now and doing grade 3 and above (the education ministry considers her grade 3, but in many areas she's is above that). We are now homeschooling but are enrolled with a virtual school to which we report to and get advice from. There are many areas she is passionate about.

My youngest is 4 and has just started to show her own abilities, etc. She is not as exceptional as her sister so we haven't noticed her skills as much early on. (for example, her sister started talking at 6 months, with big sentences by 9 months, whereas she talked in sentences at 14 months but she started walking earlier than her sister did)

anyway, enough about us for now...
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#8 of 364 Old 12-14-2005, 02:30 PM
 
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Subscribing.

Allgirls, I remember having that same discussion with BeanBean when he was 20 months old and we had a brand new BooBah. It helped that he had an older cousin who could help explain the concept of patience to him. I have to say, though, that I totally second the recommendation about looking at Sophia's diet. BeanBean was anemic at that age, and as I've said before adding an herbal iron supplement to his diet did wonders for his temper.

My brain has started to shrivel up and die... and I am miserable and angry all the time now. Yesterday was actually pretty decent; you can tell because I wasn't on MDC all day, pretending that I have no life outside of the computer while writing my least-coherent posts ever... I really need to take more flax seed oil. Bleh.

BeanBean really wants me to make more of an effort to do "schoolish" things with him every single day. He absolutely loves it, and I don't think that it's just because "he likes spending time with Mamma." He'll drag anyone who is sitting still into a discussion about nouns, or addition, or whatever. I feel guilty as heck for not being able to do more with him. I really need a lot of help to get organized, though, because we don't have places to put everything... I dunno. I've got plans, but they all seem to require things that we don't really have right now. We'll see what happens, and in the meantime I'll do what he drags me to do and feel guilty for not offering more.

BooBah is really starting to talk like a person now. I have a feeling that she wouldn't say anything at all if BeanBean wasn't around, that she'd be one of those kids who didn't say a word and then started talking in complete, adult sentences around 24 months just like magic. However, BeanBean *is* around, and he never. shuts. up. So BooBah's picked up all sorts of things to say, just by listening to BeanBean and repeating what he says. He never stops talking, so I think that BooBah thinks that's the default setting for kids, you know? It's kind of cute, and very funny.

Rynna, Mama to Bean (8), Boobah (6), Bella (4) and Bear (2)
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#9 of 364 Old 12-14-2005, 02:31 PM
 
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#10 of 364 Old 12-14-2005, 02:42 PM
 
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Originally Posted by m&m
subscribing

I introduced myself a long time ago on a previous thread, but thought a re-introduction was in order.
I should re post my intro from the other thread too, here it is. Oh, I posted it yesterday if that makes any difference.


I realized that aside from my Santa Clause rant, I never formally introduced myself. I'm mom to two wonderful children ds, just turned 4 and dd, newly 3 months old. I came across your board doing some research on giftedness because it is becoming more and more clear that ds may be gifted. He could just be really bright, but I thought I'd subscribe anyway. You'll have to forgive me as I have not read through this whole thread, so I'm not sure we fit here or not.

I won't go into boring details, but here are some things that have stuck out about our son the last few years:

*rolled over at 1 month, crawled at 3.5 months, walked at almost 6 months and ran by 7 months

*spoke his first word at 1 month old, had a vocabulary of over 50 words by 5 months, was stringing words together by 6 months and spoke in full sentences by 1 year

*always just had a greater sense of awareness and understanding than other babies

*hit all the milestones early, knew the alphabet and could count to 20 by 11 months, had figured out how to count backwards by 15 months and started saying the ABC's backwards around then too

*could read many words at 12 months, could read almost anything by 18 months. Was reading chapter books by 24 months, his first being "The Magic Treehouse" series. He finished those by 2.5 years old and polished off Stuart Little, Charlotte's Web and the The Mouse and the Motorcycle by 3. He's currently devouring the Chronicles of Narnia series and loving them

*He understood complex math concepts like addition, subtraction, multiplication, division and skip counting by 2.5 years

*Could do 100 piece puzzles by 18 months. Is now into those 3D ones of buildings and stuff

I don't want to bore you, that's our son in a nutshell though. I'm looking forward to meeting everyone here!
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#11 of 364 Old 12-14-2005, 03:00 PM
 
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Hi everyone. I introduced myself in thread #5 and have been lurking ever since. : For good measure, I'll introduce myself again. I am mom to one DS who just turned three. I'm hoping for more children but that is another topic. I've never been tested for giftedness, my mother was gifted and was disturbed by the way she was treated in school so she refused any testing or special stuff for her children. DH is gifted.

I've never had DS tested for giftedness or anything but he does lots of things that absolutely amaze me. He has been in preschool since he is 2 1/2 and is the youngest one there. Even though he is now three he only wants to play with the 4-4 1/2 year olds because they can communicate on his level. He has an amazing vocabulary. Just yesterday he was counting (unprompted) in the car in the 70's. I had no idea he knew that many numbers. He is extremely curious about everything and asks tons of questions.

Anyway, for the past few weeks when I pick him up from preschool his teacher makes a point of saying how smart he is. I'm not sure how to handle this so I just say, "thank you." Yesterday she said, "I can really tell you work with him at home." My jaw dropped because I think she is under the impression that we grill numbers and facts and words into his head at home. We absolutely don't do that. He asks questions and we answer them and use that as an opportunity for learning. That is all.
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#12 of 364 Old 12-14-2005, 03:14 PM
 
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subbing
I have been lurking for oh, a few threads now, though I did post early. DD is almost 9, and clearly not profoundly gifted, but still in the range.
School won't put her in their program, although they all see the creativity and "sideways" thinking I talk about...if it can't be quantified, they don't want to know about it. I think I stopped posting about when they told me that. But her mind is still working away, different from her peers, and I'm still dealing with the sensitivity, curiosity, challenge of her...
So I think I'll hang out a bit, if you all don't mind.
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#13 of 364 Old 12-14-2005, 03:17 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by teachma
Hi, Velveteen.

Subscribing. Also wanted to quickly brag about dd. (Since I am always talking about ds...) Last night, I was counting for ds to see how quickly he could do something (counting motivates him) and I stopped at 8. Dd continued counting where I left off, all the way to 20. I never knew she could count past 10! She hasn't been "taught," but obviously picked it up. Now, I realize that some of the profoundly gifted kids have been doing this from a year old, or maybe even earlier, but at 20.5 months old, she is far ahead of the "norm," I think. And this is where I find it so hard for my kids to fit in. I can't compare them with the super-gifted, but thinking about them in relation to the regular just doesn't work for us either. Are there any more kids like this around?
I too have a child that doesn't fit with the super gifted kids, as she's not reading novels or writing at 3, but she just doesn't fit with "average". Around here the biggest thing is language- she speaks like a small grown up and has for a while now. For example, if you ask her which thing she wants her reply might be "Acutally, I would like the red one please", instead of the "that" that I see other kids her age do while pointing. I think there are a fair number of mom's here with kids who fall between super genius and above average, its OK.

Laura, Mama to Mya 7/02, Ian 6/07 and Anna 8/09
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#14 of 364 Old 12-14-2005, 03:19 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Lovemyboy- I wouldn't take offense. There are a suprising number of parents out there who don't take the time to answer their children's questions, read to them, and sing songs with them. All those things kids need, I'm sure the teacher was just trying to compliment your parenting.

Laura, Mama to Mya 7/02, Ian 6/07 and Anna 8/09
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#15 of 364 Old 12-14-2005, 06:26 PM
 
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subbing real quick. i will re-intro when i can get more time to myself. yeah, like that will ever happen!
nice to have a new thread going!

treehugger.gif )O( unschooling, witchy mum to Addy(7) and Niamh(4)
Living with an invisible chronic illness.
Fat and hairy. And happy with both *( o Y o )*
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#16 of 364 Old 12-14-2005, 07:41 PM
 
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Originally Posted by OTMomma
I too have a child that doesn't fit with the super gifted kids, as she's not reading novels or writing at 3, but she just doesn't fit with "average". Around here the biggest thing is language- she speaks like a small grown up and has for a while now. For example, if you ask her which thing she wants her reply might be "Acutally, I would like the red one please", instead of the "that" that I see other kids her age do while pointing. I think there are a fair number of mom's here with kids who fall between super genius and above average, its OK.

That's DD too. She reads and writes, does adding, subtracting and some simple multiplying and dividing, while her K classmates (some of them, that is) are still figuring out how to write their names, letters and numbers.
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#17 of 364 Old 12-14-2005, 08:53 PM
 
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Hi!
subscribing too!
I was "gifted" by school standards (though I don't know how much of my brain is left these days! LOL!) and DH has a very high IQ. So it was no suprise to us to find that our children are "above average" in many areas.

It's interesting to see how they have developed and grown in different areas.

DS is reading above 5th grade level and he is quite bored by school-we are sticking with it for now (working on sensory issues and possible diagnosis of Asperger's) and supplementing his education with at home education that he enjoys immensely.

DD is developing in other areas, she is especially gifted physically and has extraordanary balnce and poise in all movement.

DD2 has started counting to 20 recently and is able to repeat songs word for word. She is getting into "reading" more though she doesn't really "read" yet.

It is nice to have a place we can talk about these things, I feel so odd when I talk about them to anyone IRL-like I'm "bragging" or something.

Has anyone encountered issues with giftedness in older kids?

DS has some tics, some social issues, and we are on the journey of having him evaluated. I go back and forth wondering if it is the "system" that labels him as something versus having this special way of dealing with the world that I think may have more to do with being gifted than anything else.

It's frustrating because I know his needs aren't being met daily in the classroom, yet we need to be able to use the "system" right now to see if it helps with the issues we have.

Any advice on that end would be appreciated.

Thanks!
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#18 of 364 Old 12-14-2005, 09:30 PM
 
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Just wanted to welcome the new people. Your kids all sound amazing.

I've been sick for the last week so I'm useless right now. I hope to catch up on everything later.
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#19 of 364 Old 12-14-2005, 10:34 PM
 
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TEAK is also one the the kids who is not, I think, profoundly gifted. She is 3.5 and while she doesn't really write yet, she does read novels and create the most elaborate play. Her vocabulary also tends to alarm people.

I'm not sure about ABKA yet. She's only 15 months old and doesn't talk all that clearly. She has a couple hundred words that I understand and more that I'm not always getting. She is certainly bright, but I don't know yet if she is gifted.

We'll be back.
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#20 of 364 Old 12-14-2005, 10:43 PM
 
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Originally Posted by CAmomto1
That's DD too. She reads and writes, does adding, subtracting and some simple multiplying and dividing, while her K classmates (some of them, that is) are still figuring out how to write their names, letters and numbers.
Yeah, that pretty much sounds like my 5 year old. He has other markers of giftedness (creativity, verbal ability, and more) but achievement-wise I'd consider him "above average," not amazing. I actually just got off the phone with his teacher who remarked on his handwriting, and how small and controlled it has become...I was quite surprised, as he was never advanced with anything fine-motor related. But the teacher also mentioned some kids still need to learn to identify letters, others are woring on developing longer attention spans, but my son's area of need is remembering that he's not the teacher!
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#21 of 364 Old 12-14-2005, 11:00 PM
 
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I wanted to welcome all the new posters as well.

Quote:
DS has some tics, some social issues, and we are on the journey of having him evaluated. I go back and forth wondering if it is the "system" that labels him as something versus having this special way of dealing with the world that I think may have more to do with being gifted than anything else.
I hear this. I think it can be very hard to parse. I am really wondering if we are going to be looking at this once Froglet gets in school. I'm not saying that I think she's going to be diagnosable, per se, but that I think she is going to be socially unusual, and that it's going to be hard to separate giftedness from the possibility of a mild something "else." This is just my instinct, right now, as I watch her and compare her to other toddlers her age.

Someone recommended a book to me...shoot, can't quite recall the name ...something about giftedness and dual diagnosis?

grateful mother to DD, 1/04, and DS, 2/08

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#22 of 364 Old 12-14-2005, 11:18 PM
 
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Originally Posted by kellywhalen

DS has some tics, some social issues, and we are on the journey of having him evaluated. I go back and forth wondering if it is the "system" that labels him as something versus having this special way of dealing with the world that I think may have more to do with being gifted than anything else.
Welcome to you. My ds is 5 and we just completed an evaluation which revealed, well, not too much. I have known for some time that he has anxiety, and during periods of severe anxiety, obsessive-compulsive behaviors have emerged along with some relatively mild physical tics. Last summer, for instance, he was constantly wiping his mouth with the back of his wrist, after each time he ate a bite of food or spoke at all. He was also shrugging one shoulder and rolling his neck frequently. He has been in therapy since June for the anxiety, and all of these symptoms have been completely alleviated. He remains tense and high strung, but that's more like how I am, so I think it's either hereditary or learned. He has had a variety of social issues because he has never liked to play the same way as boys his age. He doesn't like toys, but instead likes to make sculptures and symmetrical designs with all sorts of art supplies, create elaborate scenarious to act out (kind of like playing house, but with magical stuff or religious themed ideas, or pirates from time to time). Now he is starting to enjoy more physical activities (basketball, soccer, tae kwon do) and that's helped him during times like recess at school. He doesn't ever choose to have friends come over to play, but I invite them periodically anyway. Sometimes it's a success, and other times, he is so opinionated about what they should do on the playdate that the whole thing backfires. It's hard. I can relate. Oh yeah, and we also have some sensory issues that come and go, fluctuating also with the level of his overall anxiety.
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#23 of 364 Old 12-14-2005, 11:22 PM
 
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I wanted to welcome all the new posters as well.



I hear this. I think it can be very hard to parse. I am really wondering if we are going to be looking at this once Froglet gets in school. I'm not saying that I think she's going to be diagnosable, per se, but that I think she is going to be socially unusual, and that it's going to be hard to separate giftedness from the possibility of a mild something "else." This is just my instinct, right now, as I watch her and compare her to other toddlers her age.
So interesting because I remember feeling this exact way about ds when he was of toddler age, and it has proven true! My dd, on the other hand, aside from being pretty advanced in all areas of development, is so strikingly "normal," that's kind of frightening too! She just happens to be an exceptionally coordinated 20 month old who speaks paragraphs, understands everything, but plays like a regular kid in most ways.
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#24 of 364 Old 12-15-2005, 12:56 AM
 
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but my son's area of need is remembering that he's not the teacher!
LOL! That resonates with me.
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#25 of 364 Old 12-15-2005, 10:48 AM
 
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I've got older kid gifted issues, but they're all mine. I've still got a complex about my childhood and teen years.

BeanBean is another kid who seems strikingly normal in many ways, but the more I look at his "normal" behaviors, the more extraordinary he seems to be. He's extroverted and very sociable, and I always thought that was what "normal" meant, but it turns out that I was wrong... BeanBean is rather exceptional in this regard. People are shocked by what he has to say, true, but I think that most of the time they're more shocked that he's initiating and continuing conversation with them. For example: a month or two (or three? ) ago, BeanBean ran away from me in a department store. This wasn't a huge surprise, but this time he was too fast and I lost track of him (I'm not tall enough to see over racks or shelves in stores). I had worked in a store in this chain before, so I knew their lost/unattended child code and walked to the aisle to wait for it. When I heard it, I went towards the department that called the code and saw BeanBean walking, holding hands with a clerk and chatting amiably with an assistant manager. "There's my Mamma and my sister!" he said, and came to give me a hug. The clerk was smitten ("he's so adorable!") and the assistant manager was very impressed. "He was so polite, he just came up to us and asked if we'd please help him find his Mamma and his sister. What a sweet kid!"

Apparently, what's *typical* for a nearly-three-year-old is for the child to burst into tears when they realize that Mamma is no longer in visual range. Not so with BeanBean, who felt perfectly safe even before he found the clerk. There were other people in the store, but BeanBean went straight for someone who worked there, with whom he felt comfortable. My own reaction in such a situation at his age would have been atypical, but in a different direction; BeanBean's confidence was/is totally extraordinary, and his social skills are, in my mind, astounding.

Rynna, Mama to Bean (8), Boobah (6), Bella (4) and Bear (2)
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#26 of 364 Old 12-16-2005, 12:49 AM
 
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So BeanBean has been "officially" home educating since August. Over the past two weeks, despite my completely miserable self being around, he's made some *huge* leaps. It's absolutely unbelievable to me to watch him sometimes! I've written down a few of the things that he's working on and I'm just seriously impressed.

We'll probably start Story of the World, part I next week and kick Torah study into gear. He's been asking me for-- get this-- homework. He wants to do the books that ChibiChibi did last year (MCP Phonics and Spelling Workout). He's developed this sudden interest in writing, is absolutely *loving* reading and recitation... I always knew that there was a possibility that he'd just jump forward like this, but I wasn't actually *expecting* it so soon. I'm not quite sure what I'll do with him before I can get the books, though. He's having the time of his life with EarlyBird 2B, and I've been letting him "write" and giving him words to copy (no whole sentences yet, though he's asked for them... maybe soon) but without "kindergarten paper." I'm very concerned that I might stress him out about the writing thing, because I've heard so much about little boys and writing, but BeanBean is so incredibly happy to sit writing "carfax reports" for ages... Funny kid!

At any rate, I didn't mean this post to just be a brag on my Bean (though it did turn out that way : ). I was just curious, once again, about the line between following a child's interests and encouraging too much involvement with something. I feel a bit like I've let a tornado loose with the whole home education thing, like the Bean is out of the bag and ready to *run*. I'm not so much worried about burning him out at this point as I am about making him strange, or allowing him to *be* strange... I'm also not articulating well, I've got bad TBP.

I'm also wondering what to do with BooBah, who seems desperate to do the things that her brother does. She throws fits when she can't! I don't even know how to console her, she's 18 months old she's not supposed to care that she can't recite poems or whatever. She's not even supposed to *notice*. So what can I do with her mininess?

Rynna, Mama to Bean (8), Boobah (6), Bella (4) and Bear (2)
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#27 of 364 Old 12-16-2005, 01:17 AM
 
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In no particular order:

Rynna, what are you using for Torah study? I still haven't found anything for ds's level that I like and I'm winging it.

Allgirls, I was going to suggest that maybe Sophia just needs to have a few things explained - like, maybe, that you will teach her to read? It might not have occurred to her that there's a straightforward solution to the problem!

I, too, have a not-pg-but definitely-off-the-regular-curve kid, who also thinks he's the teacher or at least that teacher's assistant. And since it's OK to brag here, may I please mention that he just blew through 3 years of math in a year and will start the 4th grade math curriculum tomorrow! He's multiplying, dividing and exchanging like an old pro - it's really fun to teach him! (We use Shiller math, if anyone's interested.)

OK, I'm slinking back into the shadows of lurkdom now...
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#28 of 364 Old 12-16-2005, 10:37 AM
 
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Rynna, it must be very tough with BooBah emulating her bro but unable to measure up...I have this at my house, but to a much lesser degree because my children are 3.5 years apart. So, it is mostly the case that dd understands the differences between her brother and her. However, particularly with physical stunts, it seems that she can come very close to being able to do what he does by observing for just a few minutes. For instance, ds started Tae Kwon Do a few weeks ago. He is just getting to the point where he feels confident enough to show me some of his stuff at home. He is into teaching his sister what he learns, and MAN, she gets it instantly. All the forms and poses, jumps, spins, Korean vocalizations...I can sit on the couch and watch their performance all day.

Dd is suddenly interested in classifying everything according to "big" and "little." Now she is really reminding me of her brother! She's been using the words "big" and "little" (and huge, small, and tiny, and teeny-tiny...as well as probably other synonyms that now escape me) for months, but now she's asking the rhetorical, "Is ______ big or little?" and answering it herself. I was sure she's consider her big brother "big," but no, she knows he's little!

Rynna, I too am interested in how you're approaching Torah study. Ds borders on religious fanaticism at times at least compared to my significantly laid back feel about it...but he is so into it that I would like to supplement his once-weekly Hebrew school. Everyone thinks I have a future rabbi on my hands...possibly the first Irish/Chinese/Jewish fellow to pursue that position? (yep, I always said my kids were destined to be smart because tgey are mutts, and aren't mixed breed dogs supposed to possess greater intelligence?--TOTALLY kidding, in case my attempt at humor is not interpreted as such!)
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#29 of 364 Old 12-16-2005, 01:52 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by teachma
Rynna, it must be very tough with BooBah emulating her bro but unable to measure up...I have this at my house, but to a much lesser degree because my children are 3.5 years apart. So, it is mostly the case that dd understands the differences between her brother and her. However, particularly with physical stunts, it seems that she can come very close to being able to do what he does by observing for just a few minutes. For instance, ds started Tae Kwon Do a few weeks ago. He is just getting to the point where he feels confident enough to show me some of his stuff at home. He is into teaching his sister what he learns, and MAN, she gets it instantly. All the forms and poses, jumps, spins, Korean vocalizations...I can sit on the couch and watch their performance all day.
How cool! When it comes to most physical activities, BooBah is the one who's teaching BeanBean. Her gross motor skills are a total mystery to me... she must have inherited them from my youngest sister, I was never all that coordinated. I can still remember working such things out logically, rather than physically. BooBah, however, has this natural instinct for physical movement. Outside of the swimming pool (where BeanBean excells) BooBah definately comes out ahead. The thing is, everything that she shows BeanBean, he picks up right away. He needs to practice, though, and he's not as fearless/trusting as she is with most things. It's like, he'll watch her and figure out what she's doing, but he's afraid when he does it himself... and he doesn't have the natural feel for it. Sort of like Dink asking Ender to demonstrate his "lying on his back" attack; he saw it and saw that it was cool and worked, but didn't understand what he was actually looking at or what Ender was really doing...

Quote:
Dd is suddenly interested in classifying everything according to "big" and "little." Now she is really reminding me of her brother! She's been using the words "big" and "little" (and huge, small, and tiny, and teeny-tiny...as well as probably other synonyms that now escape me) for months, but now she's asking the rhetorical, "Is ______ big or little?" and answering it herself. I was sure she's consider her big brother "big," but no, she knows he's little!
OMG, BeanBean has been doing this too, only he's classifying everyone as a baby, little kid, big kid, punk kid ( this is what I call teenagers/people in their early 20's who aren't "adults") and grownups. Mike and I are grownups, BeanBean (3) is a little kid, ChibiChibi (8) is a big kid, BeastieBeast (5) is a big kid sometimes and a little kid sometimes (which makes sense; she can do all sorts of things, but she needs a lot of supervision because she has no sense of danger), my sister (24) is a punk kid. All of this makes sense, until you get to his aunt, SIL (39). "Aunt SIL is a big kid," he declared on Wednesday. "Really? She's not a grownup?" "No, she has very noisy toys and that makes her a big kid." When I told Mike about he just about fell over laughing. I can hardly wait to tell SIL, who will no doubt agree.

Quote:
Rynna, I too am interested in how you're approaching Torah study. Ds borders on religious fanaticism at times at least compared to my significantly laid back feel about it...but he is so into it that I would like to supplement his once-weekly Hebrew school. Everyone thinks I have a future rabbi on my hands...possibly the first Irish/Chinese/Jewish fellow to pursue that position? (yep, I always said my kids were destined to be smart because tgey are mutts, and aren't mixed breed dogs supposed to possess greater intelligence?--TOTALLY kidding, in case my attempt at humor is not interpreted as such!)
Well, I thought it was hilarious, but that's probably because I'm very mixed myself. My kids look white to the "untrained" eye, but I look sort of generic... definately "person," but I'm one of those people that other people look at and see exactly what they want to see or just a big old question mark. :

Torah Study! One of the Jewish moms here pointed me to a site called Torah Tots, which lets you know the parsha of the week and has some fun parsha related activities. It's a Tzivos Hashem site, so it's from Lubavitch (not everything may apply if you're not frum/observant) but it does give me a jumping off point. I've been looking at that and reading the appropriate stories to BeanBean, chock full of my own commentary... I'll have to find & add some links tonight. It's fun stuff. I'm trying to get into the habit of saying a bracha (she'ha'kol, because we don't keep kosher) before we eat; BeanBean has it mostly memorized, even though I forget as often as I remember. I'm still looking for a fun way to start teaching him some Hebrew. Other than his own name and his sister's, he really doesn't know all that much. :

Rynna, Mama to Bean (8), Boobah (6), Bella (4) and Bear (2)
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#30 of 364 Old 12-16-2005, 04:03 PM
 
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I'm re-introducing myself here. I'm Amy, mamma to 25 month old Henry, who we believe may be at least a little gifted. What he does, says, and remembers amazes me, and he's precocious if nothing else. When I see him around his peers, it is clear that he is "different." And many adults (and our ped.) have commented on his smarts. In fact, at his 2 year appt., where we saw a new to us dr., she was impressed with him and asked us what we were doing and I sorta shrugged my shoulders because I really don't know. I'm just parenting him and meeting him where he's at. I'm really beginning to think that a whole lot of parents don't do that at all, and certainly never talk to their kids or answer their questions.

Anyway, we've been looking at 2.5 year old pre-school programs for next fall (mostly for socialization, but a little for "academics"), and I've been getting a lot of looks for asking the "how would you address the needs of my kid who is doing x already." Some of these teachers think I am pushing him and we're merely following his lead. I've even been asked if he knows how to play (under the presumption that all I do is push him academically) which he clearly does do and does more so of independently everyday. The judging is really starting to irk me though. I have had great success with the Montessori programs and have received a ton of wonderful ideas and support. However, we think it is out of our budget for next year, so we're strongly looking to "homeschool" pre-school. In all honesty, I'd like to homeschool through at least part of elementary school, but dh is adamently against it. But even one of the Montessori teachers said that it may be our only choice in order to meet his needs.

This leads me to some questions ... ds is desperately trying to read. I'm trying to help him but realize my phonics need some brushing up on (I just sort of "got" reading, so I'm not sure I ever really learned the phonics rules). He understands that different letters and combinations of letters make different sounds, and he can "sound out" words (sounds out the individual letters but doesn't merge them to form a word), but I need to take him to the next level and help him organize his thinking a little. (He's really all over the place, and I think it is frustrating him.) We've done some starfall, but I'd like something a little more concrete and organized that I can do with him one on one. Any recommendations on reading curriculums, even from the standpoint of just helping me?

We're also going to start introducing some Montessori stuff in our home. I'm thinking of a designated area that will have some Montessori materials that I will rotate in and out every week or two, depending on his interest and mastery. Have any of you done this?

I look forward to lurking and occasionally posting. I so enjoy reading about your amazing kids.
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