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#1 of 51 Old 11-29-2006, 09:10 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Had the feedback session today at the ped. neuropsych. Ds is ADHD -- classic case and severe. So severe that the dr. said that he would recommend meds, which he doesn't normally advocate. Some anxiety and OCD tendencies, but not diagnosable. He was a VERY hard child to test because of his inattention and perfectionistic tendencies, so his IQ scores don't reflect his actual abilities, so he scored high, but not gifted.

I'm kind of reeling right now......it's good to have a diagnosis, but weird that it's ADHD. He isn't that bouncing off the walls, danger seeking kind of kid. Apparently he is just having an extremely difficult pulling his brain together to keep focused. We'll have to make accomodations for him in the classroom....need to go see a psych to talk about meds, and other stuff.

And I'm so very sad right now. I actually cried in the dr's office (which horrified me, but I couldn't help it.) Partially out of relief that it wasn't something much worse, but also because I'm realizing how hard it's been for my ds to do as well as he has. And I'm mad at myself for not seeing this before, but I guess no one else did either.

Laura - Mom to ds (10) and dd (7) "Time stands still best in moments that look suspiciously like ordinary life." Brian Andreas.

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#2 of 51 Old 11-29-2006, 09:46 PM
 
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If meds are nessasary then go with them but here is my idea...
The brain has 2 sides , one spits info out, one sucks it up. We dont eat right anymore so our brains sometimes get messed up. Basically what happens is the brain stops sucking it up and so stuff just keeps getting spit out with no where to go. What we need to do is try to open up the sucky part of the brain. Fish oil contains ingrediants that do this. You can do flax if you wanted but fish oil is already in the form that works best. Coreomega makes a orange paste that kids like to eat. I give my DD (8 months) Natural Factors liquid oil. I put it in a syringe and give it to her. There are all kinds of natural things out you could try if you want to try it first. My friend started giving her DD magnesium and zinc along with a product Vaxa makes called Attend. She says it is working well.
There are lots of diet changes you can try also. I know red dye is a major deal. It is in everything.
Another idea on ADHD is that it is natures way of evolving. Todays kids have so much to stimulate them. Cell phones, computers, gadgets, etc. Some say that they are just adapting to being able to do many things at once. Of course I am not happy with that but unfortunelty that is the way the world is heading. I admit that right now, I am watching TV and typing!
Sorry I went on a rant.
I am sorry that you are upset. I am sending you virtual hugs!
Try going to your local health food store and see what they have to offer.
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#3 of 51 Old 11-29-2006, 10:19 PM
 
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It can be a lot to process. Don't feel bad that you cried...it seems pretty natural to me that you would.

If you haven't already seen it, it would be worth taking a look at this book: http://www.amazon.com/Misdiagnosis-D...484706-7226866
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#4 of 51 Old 11-29-2006, 11:10 PM
 
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It's always hard to hear this kind of news. Take a deep breath and don't blame yourself for not figuring it out. These things are very complicated!

It's possible that we may end up with a similar outcome - I only recently discovered that ADHD can include trouble putting language together. I've read some amazingly interesting books on this lately - here's a partial list that you may find helpful:

The ADD Book - Dr. William Sears
Driven to Distraction, and (especially) Delivered From Distraction by Edward Hallowell. I heard him speak recently and he was wonderful! (He has ADD/dyslexia himself.)
Dreamers, Dynamos and Discoverers by Lucy Jo Palladino

And above all, the Eides' "Mislabeled Child" book. They have a substantial chapter on ADHD, which includes all kinds of useful strategies which could help your son. They make the very important point that attention can be strengthened and trained, and that using drugs may actually prevent a child from evenually learning to take control of the condition. Please read that before making any firm decision about drugs, and check out information also on neurofeedback training (THe ADD Answer; ADD - the 20 Hour Solution; and A Symphony in the Brain are three useful books about that. Sears and Hallowell mention it also).

Also - don't stop doing your own research, and if necessary get a second opinion. I have a friend whose 7yo son was also dignosed as "very severely ADD", but another (very famous) doctor said she didn't consider his case nearly as serious as that, and worked with him on executive function coaching. To a certain extent, the diagnosis you get does depend on who you go do.

Oh, and FISH OIL! Hallowell says he takes 2 grams a day - too much for a kid, obviously, but check out recommneded doses on ADD lists and boards.
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#5 of 51 Old 11-29-2006, 11:21 PM
 
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{{{{{Laura}}}}}

I've been thinking about you guys and meaning to PM you back from a while ago.
You are an amazing mother, you know that, right? And your son is an amazing little guy and he's so lucky to have a Mom who cares so deeply about his needs.
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#6 of 51 Old 11-29-2006, 11:25 PM
 
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Laura, I responded to this in the other thread in Parenting Issues- saw it there first.
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#7 of 51 Old 11-30-2006, 08:16 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Thanks everyone for your positive words and suggestions. I really needed them.

I went to the school today and spoke with ds' teachers - both of them were really surprised that it's AD/HD, but are very eager to start getting things in place for ds. Both of them have had AD/HD students who were failing kindergarten, not working above grade level, so it hadn't crossed their minds. One teacher even said "It isn't often that you have a child come into kindergarten knowing what (your ds) does." But obviously, he can't be working up to his ability. We're going to schedule a Discovery Meeting when the neuropsych. can be present so he can explain exactly the nature of ds' ADHD (it varies quite a bit by individual) and then we can re-write his IEP to make accomodations.

One thing for sure - now I know why I'm so tired all the time! I have a hard time keeping up with a kid who can't even keep up with himself. :

Thanks again for all the support -- and if anyone has anything else to add, I'm all ears! PM me or whatever!

Laura - Mom to ds (10) and dd (7) "Time stands still best in moments that look suspiciously like ordinary life." Brian Andreas.

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#8 of 51 Old 12-01-2006, 07:22 PM
 
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Of course you were upset!! That is a normal healthy response.

My bestfriend is a special ed teacher and has for YEARS PREACHED about ADHD being a training problem . . .

She was diagnosed with it about a year ago. She argued and her psych just asked her to take the meds for a week. SHE IS STILL TAKING THEM NOW!!! and 2 of her 3 kids are on them.

She says that it was like a cloud lifted off of her brain and she could suddenly see and think SOOO much easier. When she forgets she gets really tired because it takes so much energy, thought and work to do her regular stuff.

Soo, I say, be glad for a medication that could improve your child's life in such a huge way. And then you can suppliment that with diet changes, etc. But DO NOT FEEL GUILTY for using medication!!

Courtney wife to geek.gif and mom to 4 boys: chicken3.gif   . I need caffix.gif !
They're not typos. . . I can't spell!
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#9 of 51 Old 12-01-2006, 07:26 PM
 
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LauraLoo,

I want to be supportive of your emotional situation, as you seem sad and surprised about the diagnosis. I also want to empower you to research the "parameters" involved in an ADHD diagnosis. You know your son better than any neuropsych doctor or psychiatrist. From what I have read about your son, he is exceptionally and intensely aware of the world around him. I truly believe that there are some children 'Born to Explore'. http://borntoexplore.org/ And that this is not a gift meant to be medicated to conform to environments which are not condusive to his abilities, learning and joy.

I will share that I feel certain that our son similarly could be diagnosed, because the measure of ADHD is based upon behavioral, not physiological variables. Just as homosexuality was considered a DSM diagnosis socioculturally in the recent past, now ADHD is. I am passionately aware that the characteristics of intensity can be limiting in some environments that do not honor or value the intensity of physicality or rapid awareness of many sensory stimuli. However, an environment that supports, nurtures and celebrates his unique abilities and gifts is possible. Please consider reading Anne Ohman's article "I AM WHO I AM" http://www.livingjoyfully.ca/anneo/I_Am_What_I_Am.htm It is one of my favorite article about not trying to "fix" our children.

Respectfully and much support to Trust your own heart,

Pat

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#10 of 51 Old 12-01-2006, 09:54 PM
 
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It's quite a lot to deal with, and I applaud your efforts to find help for your son. Go you!

I'm not going to immediately assume that your doctor is wrong, but I myself have been diagnosed with ADHD, sans hyperactivity. I don't actually have ADHD, and nobody who actually understands the requirements laid out in the DSM-IV could possibly diagnose me with ADHD unless they had some agenda for doing so. The shrink who gave me the diagnosis wrote his thesis on ADHD; as my mother said, "When you've got a hammer, everything looks like a nail."

Just food for thought. Do some research on your own. Oh, and I totally second the fish oil-- omega fatty acids are really good for all sorts of brain issues (including the headaches that some gifted children get because they think so quickly, in my experience). I take flax seed oil whenever I can, because fish oil freaks me out, but I'm just odd that way.

Rynna, Mama to Bean (8), Boobah (6), Bella (4) and Bear (2)
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#11 of 51 Old 12-02-2006, 02:41 AM - Thread Starter
 
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I've been mulling around in my head for the past couple of days. I haven't been normal me. No research, no books to delve into. I'm a highly intuitive person that seems to feel the need to deny my intuition - so I always try to justify my intuition with logic. I wanted to make sure that I wasn't in some sort of deep denial. Somehow this ADHD diagnosis - especially the severity that the doctor gave - seems wrong to me. I'm objecting to the severity of it.

There are some reasons for my objection -- so I'm going to think out loud. I believe that we omitted some information that might have been useful in the intake session. Right before school started, my husband was completely down with back issues. He had surgery 5 years ago and has struggled ever since. He was on some massive painkillers for a good month when ds started school and it's only been in the last few weeks that DH has been able to go into work for a solid 5 days. This has been incredibly stressful for me - and I'm sure that the kids aren't immune to this stress. On top of this, at the beginning of Oct., ds had a severe reaction to a parainfluenza virus that required him to be sedated and put on a ventilator. He spent 4 days in the PICU. He rebounded well - and went back to school the following week. That was also major trauma for all of us. Of course, the school situation has been less than ideal, so I think I overestimated ds' ability to overcome all of this. As an adult, I just plod through all of life's curve balls. DS is an incredibly sensitive kid and I should have mentioned all of this to the dr., but we were talking about so many other things that it just didn't come up. In the feedback session, the dr. did say that ds seemed to be an anxious child, but it didn't click until I started thinking that he probably is anxious and for good reason. He's been under a lot of stress for a 5 year old and in all actuality, he's coping pretty darn well!

The other thing that I found out by reading the "Born to Explore" link that Pat gave was that the dr. did not do a test for creativity as part of ds' assessment. I think this was a big mistake. DS is VERY creative and I think that definitely needed to be considered in the overall picture (Penny -- take note of this for Ben!) It might be a big part of why he didn't seem to stay on task -- he processes what's required quickly and then decides he wants to do it his way. He also did what I feared he would - he gave silly answers to some questions - like he was supposed to identify pictures, and for an open book, he said "Computer." He did answer the rest of this test correctly, but it reminds me of the "Chickens don't wear hats" post -- ask a silly question, I'll give you a silly answer. Overall, I think that the testing situation was less than ideal for a good & accurate picture of ds -- of course, ds didn't do much to help it by giving silly answers.

I volunteered in ds' classroom yesterday. He seemed just "normal." He was excited to have me there, but he kept on task. He paid attention in circle time, aked questions, followed multi-step directions for the class work (it was pretty detailed in my opinion - I might have goofed!), finished his work without the help of the teacher or the aide, and moved on to activities of his choice, didn't need any transition warnings for all of this, and cleaned up right away when it was time to do closing activities. There were at least 3 other students that needed to be consistently re-directed, but ds was not one of them. Both of the teachers (AM and PM) were surprised when I told them that it was ADHD -- so what does that tell me? He might have ADHD, but I just don't see that it can be as severe as what the dr. thinks.

I think what I'm going to do is get some fish oil going (Suziraye - thanks for the Coromega suggestion - I think ds would take that form!) since the suggestions have been so positive for that. I'm also going to add another Omega 3-6-9 supplement and really watch the food dyes and look for any other food sensitivities. I'm going to wait to schedule the appointment with the psychiatrist to discuss meds until he's been on the fish oil for a full month to see if this helps. I definitely won't medicate unless I can't see any other option. I absolutely have to do much more research on ADHD before we go down that path.

I've been searching so long for answers to my son's speech delay because it was so inconsitent with his other abilities, that I guess I stopped focusing on what really is RIGHT with him. Pat - that article "I AM WHO I AM" was priceless! And exactly what I needed to read right now. I will NOT fix what isn't broken and I won't allow anyone else to, either.

Laura - Mom to ds (10) and dd (7) "Time stands still best in moments that look suspiciously like ordinary life." Brian Andreas.

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#12 of 51 Old 12-02-2006, 12:06 PM
 
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It sounds like you've been doing some good thinking.

You mentioned the teachers were surprised by the diagnosis. Did the evaluation include any discussion with the teacher or any observations of him in school?
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#13 of 51 Old 12-02-2006, 12:46 PM
 
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Something about adhd that really bothers me: one of the *requirements* is that symptoms exist in at least two different settings. if a teacher says, "this kid has adhd" but he doesn't exhibit any symptoms at home, then he cannot by definition have adhd. so a shrink *cannot* diagnose it on the basis of a child's behavior in his office; he has to have parental and/or school input as well, if he is to make a correct diagnosis.

i've met loads of people who were medicated for adhd, but i've only met two who *have* it.

Rynna, Mama to Bean (8), Boobah (6), Bella (4) and Bear (2)
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#14 of 51 Old 12-02-2006, 12:59 PM - Thread Starter
 
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You mentioned the teachers were surprised by the diagnosis. Did the evaluation include any discussion with the teacher or any observations of him in school?
No, it didn't include any of that. And I keep going back to a comment that his PM teacher made. She said, "It isn't very often that a child comes into kindergarten knowing what (your ds) does."

I also think that the behavior issues that ds displayed early on in the year have mostly gone away. I'm definitely not hearing about them with any great frequency. He still has some difficult moments - perfectionistic tendencies and some issues that I can attribute to overstimulation or lack of sleep the night before. This PM teacher said that when ds knows he has unlimited time to finish a project, he works without guidance from start to finish and he works carefully. The same thing holds true at home. He gets frazzeled when we have to hurry. This just doesn't sound like an impulsive kid. However, in testing, the dr. said that when ds DID have unlimited time to finish certain tests (specifically for impulsivity,) he hurried and made many mistakes.

Laura - Mom to ds (10) and dd (7) "Time stands still best in moments that look suspiciously like ordinary life." Brian Andreas.

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#15 of 51 Old 12-02-2006, 01:05 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Something about adhd that really bothers me: one of the *requirements* is that symptoms exist in at least two different settings. if a teacher says, "this kid has adhd" but he doesn't exhibit any symptoms at home, then he cannot by definition have adhd. so a shrink *cannot* diagnose it on the basis of a child's behavior in his office; he has to have parental and/or school input as well, if he is to make a correct diagnosis.
Yeah -- this bothers me, too. I wouldn't say that he's completely impulse free, but he's a 5 year old boy!!! I guess what's really getting me is that the ped. neruopsych. is one of the co-authors of the "Misdiagnosis and Dual Diagnosis of Gifted Children." He's in our backyard, and I felt he would be a good choice - right???! But I do know that experts make mistakes. It just seems like he wouldn't be as likely to.

Rynna - what do you think the agenda would have been for diagnosing you for ADHD? I'm curious.

Laura - Mom to ds (10) and dd (7) "Time stands still best in moments that look suspiciously like ordinary life." Brian Andreas.

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#16 of 51 Old 12-02-2006, 03:49 PM
 
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LauraLoo, here are some additional resources about the subjectiveness of the ADHD diagnosis. Mostly, I hope that you rely on your heart for knowing what your son needs, not "experts".


http://www.naturalchild.org/guest/john_breeding.html

http://www.naturalchild.org/guest/david_keirsey.html

http://www.naturalchild.org/guest/thomas_armstrong.html

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/AS...2275474/ncp-20

http://www.thomasarmstrong.com/

http://www.docdiller.com/

http://www.home.att.net/~fred-alden

http://www.wildestcolts.com/

Laura, here is a link about a friend's journey with her gifted child who was labelled ADHD. http://www.livingjoyfully.ca/family/our_journey.htm


Pat

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#17 of 51 Old 12-02-2006, 07:22 PM
 
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Here are a few more resources: www.visualspatial.org (Upside-Down Brilliance: The Visual Spatial Learner) Apparently, this is a huge variable in misdiagnosing ADHD, due to the varied processing of data presented, a person may *appear* to be delayed or confused by the information in a "distractable" manner. They are actually processing data in a multi-step process, ie. with more intellectual processing, not less, as it might appear.


www.hsperson.com (The Highly Sensitive Child by Elaine Aron) The author recognizes the *gift* of acute awareness of other's emotions and the challenges that this creates. It allows my dh to be an empathic and effective manager and negotiator, for instance.

T.Armstrong has written several books about ADHD also. I don't know his work; but have heard this from friends.

ADHD Drug Free (it's a yahoo group) http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/ADHD_DrugFree/

Autism Spectum and Mercury-ADHD is also addressed
http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/Autism-Mercury/

Enzymes and Autism-ADHD is also addressed http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/EnzymesandAutism/

Homeopathy and ADHD
http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group...ADDthruAUTISM/

Pat

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#18 of 51 Old 12-02-2006, 07:56 PM
 
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check out www.vitacost.com
they are lots cheaper on supplements than most health food stores!
you could probably call the core omega company and ask them to send you samples so you can make sure he will take it. Nortic Naturals also makes some good kid friendly ones. I suggest calling both companys!
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#19 of 51 Old 12-02-2006, 09:04 PM
 
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Rynna - what do you think the agenda would have been for diagnosing you for ADHD? I'm curious.
Well, this particular doctor had done his thesis work on ADHD (the whole hammer and nails analogy my mom made). That certainly played into it. Secondly, I was in the hospital psych ward at the time, and without a diagnosis (and medication) my insurance wouldn't have paid for me to stay any longer, and of course they *wanted* me to stay longer so they could get the insurance for it. :

Rynna, Mama to Bean (8), Boobah (6), Bella (4) and Bear (2)
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#20 of 51 Old 12-03-2006, 12:57 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Well, this particular doctor had done his thesis work on ADHD (the whole hammer and nails analogy my mom made). That certainly played into it. Secondly, I was in the hospital psych ward at the time, and without a diagnosis (and medication) my insurance wouldn't have paid for me to stay any longer, and of course they *wanted* me to stay longer so they could get the insurance for it. :
My feeling is that if ds had scored into the gifted category (and some of his scores were very close - oddly not the areas that I would have considered top areas for him), the dr. would have had a different take on my ds. Maybe he would have picked up a paintbrush instead of a hammer.

Another thought -- ds is senstive and I believe highly intuitive about people. Has never been a big people pleaser, though he does like it when people are happy with him, but not to the extent that he'll dramatically change to get people on his side -- always is checking out those around him. I know that they gave him the IQ test at the very first session right away. I'm not sure why they would have done that. It seems like they might have given ds a chance to warm up to the whole testing situation.

Since he scored well, but not gifted -- and his scores were varied, they probably just decided ADHD instead of an anxious, sensitive child with asynchronous brain development. I don't know. I'm really trying to reason this out. How can my ds solve algebraic questions verbally at home, read and spell way above grade level, master puzzles that make my head spin and get high average IQ scores when tested? Something is missing.

Laura - Mom to ds (10) and dd (7) "Time stands still best in moments that look suspiciously like ordinary life." Brian Andreas.

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#21 of 51 Old 12-03-2006, 02:24 PM
 
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Miss Laura, your son's stress, physiological and emotional, this past couple of months (starting (new?) school, dad disabled, hospitalization, mom's overloaded, school situation, etc.) sounds like huge variables in his comfort and responsiveness to strangers. The hospitalization sounds traumatic and scary and invasive. Nonetheless, the drugs they use for sedation can have effects on short term memory (lost or delayed recall). Do you think there could be any "white coat syndrome" in play with the evaluation?

Additionally, we do not ask questions of our son to which we already know the answer. He doesn't like to be quizzed, it seems patronizing. For instance, a friend's grandmother asked her something like 'What is 4+2?' regarding the number of napkins needed for the dinner table. The 6-year old peered at her perplexedly and asked 'Gene, don't you know?'. The girl was confused by the inanity of the question. I imagine that asking your son who is doing algebra, 'What is that?' about a picture of a book is due some silly answer like 'a computer'. Don't ya' think?

Our son wouldn't give the time of day to a stranger who treated him in such a condensending manner. He too is very intuitive about whether people are treating him with respect or "like a child".

To me it sounds like the intellectual evaluation wasn't evaluative of his innate abilities. Nor, it seems was the physican socially responsive to your son's emotional sensitivity. We call it "observer error". I recognize that you saw 'the best in the field'. [Btw, I was a medical professional for 18 years; so, I understand that we are fallible.] Follow your heart, it won't fail you or your son.


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#22 of 51 Old 12-03-2006, 07:00 PM
 
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Laura, I have to say that when I saw you "It's ADHD" title, my reaction was "Huh???" Nothing you've said about your son previously seemed to suggest that, and then when you said his teachers were really surprised....you know, it doesn't look or a duck, or quack like a duck, so maybe it isn't a duck? (WRT school, it's not so much what he knows that waves a red flag - you can be profoundly gifted and still have ADHD, for example, and in that case you might well learn to read without paying much attention - but the fact that she doesn't think he looks like an ADHD sufferer. Usually teachers seem to over-diagnose ADHD in normal but wiggly boys, rather than under-diagnose.)

"Hammers looking for nails certainly" happens. My friend recently had her two PG kids evaluated by a VERY big name local expert (also a well-known author in this field, though I won't mention names). The doctor then wrote a "recommendation" for her kids for a private school which subsequently refused to accept them because she mentioned the "severe anxiety disorder" of one of them. Now the kid is introverted, sensitive, somewhat self-conscious, and feels nervous the first time he tries something, but "severe anxiety disorder"? No.

I think in my ds's case ADHD is a possibility, but I'm NOT going to the local ADHD expert for this very reason. I picked someone lesser-known who just seemed very open-minded, perceptive and nuanced when I talked to her. I just had a bad feeling about the other one.
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#23 of 51 Old 12-03-2006, 11:12 PM
 
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Here are a few more resources that I have learned about: http://www.ablechild.org/ Able Child: Parents for label and drug free education.

David Keirsey, author of one of the articles which the naturalchild.org linked to, apparently has written some very cool books about personality types- a personality type is still a label, but it's a non-pathologising one, designed to foster better insight and understanding into what makes an individual's clock tick.

Garret LoPorto's "The Da Vinci Method" is targeted at both adults and children who are likely to get the ADD/ADHD label stuck onto them and provides an alternative perspective focusing on the positive traits and non-medical ways of engaging those.

www.davincimethod.com


Pat, finding this information so interesting myself.

I have a blog.
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#24 of 51 Old 12-04-2006, 05:26 AM
 
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As an educational level set we had our son tested at the local Uni. We informed the tester about our son's sensory issues (SPD).

He scored very well (gifted - 99%) both on intelligence and academic knowledge testing. But he was very uncomfortable with the testing and wanted to stop. The tester had to repeat things to him and ask him to sit down to continue testing. (How is a 4 year old boy to sit down for 2 hours straight?)

The tester suggested ADHD is an issue. He actually said a drug prescription might be necessary. Confused, we said again well he has sensory issues. The tester (licensed and reviewed by faculty) then informed us he had no idea what sensory processing disorder was.

But he suggested visiting the growing ADHD clinic with its experts on the same Uni campus with its very own brand new building. Seems they are flooded with kids being suggested for ADHD testing - it takes 2 months to get an appointment.

How can I trust "experts" that have a vested monetary interest in determining my child is ADHD?

No one (family, teachers, strangers) had suggested ADHD beforehand or afterward. Our occupational therapist (OT) said she wasn't surprised they mentioned ADHD - seems they do that to everyone.
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#25 of 51 Old 12-04-2006, 11:48 AM
 
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Laura, I'm sorry you're going through all of this. When you first posted I meant to comment about how hard it is when actual labels start to be applied, but now it seems you're dealing with the wrong label! I hope you make positive progress soon. Have you looked at the Eides' site?
http://www.mislabeledchild.com/html/...ion/index.html

Mom to a teenager and a middle schooler.

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#26 of 51 Old 12-04-2006, 12:14 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Thank you for everyone for being so supportive of me and my ds. It's been a lot to deal with especially when it seems so wrong. I hope that someone else can learn from this experience and be better able to deal!

This is what I'm planning to do:

1. I'm going to contact the neuropsych and provide him with the information regarding my ds' recent unsettling home life and hospital stay and ask his opinion if that might have or would have skewed the results of ds' testing. If for no other reason than to just have this additional information be included in the final report.

2. I'm going to contact his pediatrician and schedule an appointment when we get the written report and ask his opinion on whether a second opinion would be necessary. I'm inclined to think that it is.

3. I'm going to really watch ds' diet, add fish oil, and Omega's and see if this makes a difference. I'm not really sure if I would even get perceivable differences, but it sure can't hurt.

4. I've already got one of his teachers working on thinking about ds' visual spatial orientation and sensitivity (btw - he didn't score high in the VS area - surprising in itself) and get her thoughts.

5. Continue to read, read, read.......I have so much info. to consider (thanks to Pat for all of these links and everyone else's suggestions!)

It's been really hard because I don't want to come across as one of those mom's who doesn't want to believe the worst in her child -- as a matter of fact, I'm probably overly critical when it comes to behavior. I just can't get my arms around the fact that ADHD is the correct label, so that has to tell me something.

And again -- thank you to everyone who has given me support, advice and points to consider. It has made a huge impact on how I'm approaching this situation. Please continue to send them my way. I need a lot of help right now.

Laura - Mom to ds (10) and dd (7) "Time stands still best in moments that look suspiciously like ordinary life." Brian Andreas.

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#27 of 51 Old 12-06-2006, 05:45 AM
 
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My son was Dx'd with ADD, not hyperactive earlier this year, and I have continued to question it. I am currently reading Upside-Down Brilliance: The Visual Spatial Learner and it is describing my son to a "T". It includes so many of the pieces that weren't making sense. Just understanding how he works is probably making more difference than any other single thing we have done, and we are doing many things. Look at the site that was mentioned earlier www.visualspatial.org. From your description your son sounds like this would be very helpful. He sounds gifted to me, and it is par for the course with VSL's that he wouldn't test as gifted.
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#28 of 51 Old 12-06-2006, 03:35 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Originally Posted by JBAmom View Post
My son was Dx'd with ADD, not hyperactive earlier this year, and I have continued to question it. I am currently reading Upside-Down Brilliance: The Visual Spatial Learner and it is describing my son to a "T". It includes so many of the pieces that weren't making sense. Just understanding how he works is probably making more difference than any other single thing we have done, and we are doing many things. Look at the site that was mentioned earlier www.visualspatial.org. From your description your son sounds like this would be very helpful. He sounds gifted to me, and it is par for the course with VSL's that he wouldn't test as gifted.
Thanks, JBAmom! I just placed an order with Amazon yesterday for the following books:

Guerrilla Learning: How to Give Your Kids a Real Education With or Without School" Grace Llewellyn

"Right-Brained Children in a Left-Brained World: Unlocking the Potential of Your Add Child" Jeffrey Freed

"The Hidden Gifts of the Introverted Child: Helping Your Child Thrive in an Extroverted World" Marti Olsen Laney

"Young at Art: Teaching Toddlers Self-Expression, Problem-Solving Skills, and an Appreciation for Art" Susan Striker

"The First Anti-Coloring Book: Creative Activities for Ages 6 and Up" Susan Striker

"In the Mind's Eye: Visual Thinkers, Gifted People With Dyslexia and Other Learning Difficulties, Computer Images and the Ironies of Creativity" Thomas G. West

A boatload of $'s, but worth it, IMO. I'll add Upside Down Brilliance to my next order -- or see if they have it at the library since I blew my "allowance" for the next year on this order!

Interestingly, I'm getting unsolicited emails from his teachers (he goes all day - has 2 teachers - one in the morning and one in the afternoon) -- both are commenting on how well ds is doing other than some struggles with perfectionism. Yes, he is fidgety, but he always hears what is being said and retains it. One teacher said she's reluctant to put ds in front of her during circle time (a suggestion to reduce distractions,) because he does much better when he's in back of the class -- which would be consitent with my introverted tendencies. I can't wait to get the "Hidden Gifts of the Introverted Child." I bet I'll learn a lot about what I'm overlooking with him.
I already know that I have a lot to learn regarding Visual Spatial learning style.

Question for any Visual Spatial Learners - When ds was being assessed, he was in a room with blank walls. Only a small desk and chair and another table and chair for the assessor. Would the lack of visual stimulation be distracting to ds? Like - nothing to look at while he was thinking? Just curious -- not sure if that would be relevant or not, but just something I'm trying to think about. I know that I always find myself staring blankly at something or someone when I'm really processing info. I think that all blank walls would be a problem for me.

Laura - Mom to ds (10) and dd (7) "Time stands still best in moments that look suspiciously like ordinary life." Brian Andreas.

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#29 of 51 Old 12-06-2006, 04:16 PM
 
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Originally Posted by LauraLoo View Post
Question for any Visual Spatial Learners - When ds was being assessed, he was in a room with blank walls. Only a small desk and chair and another table and chair for the assessor. Would the lack of visual stimulation be distracting to ds? Like - nothing to look at while he was thinking? Just curious -- not sure if that would be relevant or not, but just something I'm trying to think about. I know that I always find myself staring blankly at something or someone when I'm really processing info. I think that all blank walls would be a problem for me.
I can only speak for my son (a vs learner), but he would do better in an empty room, because he gets distracted by looking at details. We went to Science Club yesterday after not having been in a long time and I watched him tune out to look at the posters on the walls, the stuff on the shelves, etc.

But it sounds like there are a lot of other possible issues going on which might lead to your son not testing in a completely accurate way. I hope you find the answers!
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#30 of 51 Old 12-06-2006, 08:09 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I spoke with the neuropsych. today. He agreed that the recent family events might have had a part in my ds' performance. His overall thinking is, regardless, a typical 5 year old should have been able to perform the tests without impulsivity and with full attention.

He would not consider introversion, learning style differences (VS or Auditory Seq.) or sensitivities as being key factors. His stand is that introverted behaviors and sensory issues is the brain's inability to coordinate information effectively. He does not believe that there are predominant learning styles and that visual spatial and auditory functions are fully combined in normal functioning. He said that testing can point out deficiencies in both. (DS does not have deficiencies in his opinion.) He said that anxiety fuels natural tendencies or deficiencies - such as ADHD, but the problems need to already exist. He said that ds' perfectionistic tendencies are the by product of his innattention and need to hyperfocus.

It wasn't until I asked him about why they gave ds the IQ test as the very first test in the very first session that the Dr. seemed to pause a bit. He said there was no reason for it -- sometimes they do it first, sometimes they don't. I aksed that if he had scored gifted in a global sense, would he be looking at ds' behavior and impulsivity in a different light. The dr. said yes. I asked if perhaps my socially immature, anxious 5 year old with speech/articulation issues needed a little more time to get comfortable with the entire testing scenario and the tester rather than diving immediately into testing - would this have perhaps given him the opportunity to relax and perform better? (btw, ds spent about 3 minutes with the assessor in the lobby before going into the testing room). The dr. said yes, that might have helped and he might have done the testing differently if he had known about the recent family events. And that's when we got downgraded. DS is now a child who shows ADD tendencies and anxiety (no more H altogether.)

The revised recommendation is to work with a play therapist to work on ds' coping skills (which I believe will be helpful.) He said that he would retest ds when he's 6. He does not believe that ds will score globally gifted, but potentially highly gifted in certain areas. At this point, I'm not even sure if we would test ds again. I think I have all the information that I need to know.

I am much more comfortable now with this, but still a little unsettled at the same time.

Laura - Mom to ds (10) and dd (7) "Time stands still best in moments that look suspiciously like ordinary life." Brian Andreas.

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