Giftedness and Sensory Processing Disorder - Mothering Forums

Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
Old 10-04-2007, 10:44 PM - Thread Starter
 
nkm1968's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Cleveland
Posts: 408
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I practice child and adolescent psychiatry, mostly clinical research, but I have a small (300 kids) clinical practice as well. I have about 15 kids in my practice who are seriously gifted (hyperlexic, doing math on a college level at age 7, violin prodigy-types) who are NOT in the Asperger's spectrum, but have very severe SPDs which cause even more social/emotional problems than the giftedness per se. Is it JUST MY PRACTICE, or is there some sort of association. I have done a lot of searches on medline, but have not found any refernces OUTSIDE of the Asperger's literature. Any thoughts out there? PS most of these kids come with ASD or mood diagnoses from outside docs, but on very careful examination thay do not meet diagnostic criteria for anything except gifted, dysregulated, and egocentric.
nkm1968 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 10-05-2007, 02:09 AM
 
eilonwy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Lost
Posts: 15,067
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by nkm1968 View Post
I practice child and adolescent psychiatry, mostly clinical research, but I have a small (300 kids) clinical practice as well. I have about 15 kids in my practice who are seriously gifted (hyperlexic, doing math on a college level at age 7, violin prodigy-types) who are NOT in the Asperger's spectrum, but have very severe SPDs which cause even more social/emotional problems than the giftedness per se. Is it JUST MY PRACTICE, or is there some sort of association. I have done a lot of searches on medline, but have not found any refernces OUTSIDE of the Asperger's literature. Any thoughts out there? PS most of these kids come with ASD or mood diagnoses from outside docs, but on very careful examination thay do not meet diagnostic criteria for anything except gifted, dysregulated, and egocentric.
My understanding is that early reading is only hyperlexia if the child doing the reading doesn't understand it (i.e. my neice, who read before she could speak and even now has a reading level about five levels above her comprehension level).

There is definately an association between giftedness and SPD, but I think that very little research has been done. It's a pretty common correleation, though, and it makes perfect sense when you consider the neurology involved. The brain of a gifted individual is wired to interact with information in a different way; The more highly gifted said individual, the more differently they receive and process information of all kinds. Gifted kids notice more things in their environment, so it stands to reason that they'd be more sensitive to them. They see, hear, smell, feel things that other people aren't even aware of; Part of giftedness is not only utilizing information in a different way, but the ability to draw more information from their environment in the first place. It's a variation of the problem that autstic children have-- they can draw too much information through some channels, and too little through others. For gifted kids, it tends to be too much of *everything*.

Most of us develop coping mechanisms at some point; I cut tags out of shirts as soon as I buy them, wear my socks inside out, and buy my shoes at least half a size bigger than I "need" to so that my toes can wiggle. I understand these things about BooBah and Bella (BeanBean has very few such sensitivities, so he's easy-- just buy the same kind of underpants for him every time ), so when BooBah started telling me that her clothing "makes me mis-wa-buw!" I didn't have a problem with letting her wear fleece pajamas (though I did get very strange looks for it in the summertime ). She rarely wore other clothing (and never voluntarily) for just over a year, : but it was all good... and I still put her socks on inside-out if I want her to keep her shoes on her feet.

It's hard for little kids, though, to develop said coping mechanisms, particularly if they're unhappy about other things (like being bored at school) and/or their parents are unsympathetic or don't understand. : There's often a really difficult point where a child has these issues and can't articulate them, or can't explain why they're important, and if the parent doesn't get it there's frustration and misery all around. I can only imagine BooBah, if I hadn't immediately recognized what she meant, or if she hadn't even been able to say that she "was mis-wa-buw."

I think that in a lot of ways, it's easier now than it was when I was a kid. I'm convinced that someone working at Hanes has an autistic child or is autistic themselves, because they've really gone all out on the super-soft, tagless clothing. Their boys boxer briefs, for example, are not only tagless, but made of soft combed cotton with flat seams and no exposed elastic. Fantastic! I wish they'd been around when I was little. Tagless, flat-seam undershirts, too... a dream come true, those.

Sorry, a total tangent. Yes, the two are related; I'll dig up links if nobody beats me to it.

Rynna, Mama to Bean (8), Boobah (6), Bella (4) and Bear (2)
eilonwy is offline  
Old 10-05-2007, 03:48 AM
 
harmonymama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: In the kitchen making broth
Posts: 653
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
My DS is gifted with a sensory processing disorder. In his case, he has excellent speech, vocabulary, and verbal reasoning, but a visual processing, and motor planning issue. (Please look at the twice exceptional thread in this forum) I am a clinical social worker/ psychotherapist, and I am just beginning to realize how misunderstood these relatively common issues are. This type of problem is actually quite common, particularly in gifted boys. Please look at the work of psychologist Linda Silverman at the Gifted Development Center. She is a pioneer in the field of giftedness and learning disabilities. Go to her website and look at the Twice Exceptional page. She addresses this very topic, and I am sure they could provide you with further information or their extensive clinical practice data. Dr. Silverman has found that 1 in 6 gifted children also has a learning difference/disability. You may also be interested in a book related to this topic called "Different Minds" by Deirdre Lovecky. So glad you are investigating this. Let me know your thoughts. I actually may be doing some writing in this area.
harmonymama is offline  
Old 10-05-2007, 03:49 AM
 
harmonymama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: In the kitchen making broth
Posts: 653
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
p.s. I suspect not much formal research has been done outside Lovecky's and Silverman's practice research. Are you thinking of doing some?
harmonymama is offline  
Old 10-05-2007, 10:36 AM
 
loraxc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: In the Truffula Trees
Posts: 4,388
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
They certainly seem to coexist a lot, just in my casual reading. I recognized that I have SPD the first time I read about it (it's mild in my case, but some intervention could have helped me as a kid); I was also labeled gifted. We are going to get DD evaluated as well, as soon as our lives make it possible. We think she has it too, but her symptoms are not the same as mine--she's more of a sensory seeker. FWIW, her pediatrician and preschool teachers both believe she is gifted....and the preschool teachers also want her evaluated.

grateful mother to DD, 1/04, and DS, 2/08

loraxc is offline  
Old 10-06-2007, 01:00 AM
 
teachma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: My new house!
Posts: 4,572
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by nkm1968 View Post
PS most of these kids come with ASD or mood diagnoses from outside docs, but on very careful examination thay do not meet diagnostic criteria for anything except gifted, dysregulated, and egocentric.
Hey, sounds like you could be describing my son. He is not diagnosed with anything other than anxiety disorder/OCD but he clearly has sensory issues as well. We just have never pursued diagnosis or treatment for those because they impact our lives less than the anxiety. BUT...you take a gifted kid who has anxiety and sensory disorders, and it begins to look a lot like Aspergers. He's just a puzzle to all of us. But I think he's not alone; gifted kids to tend to have some of these other things going on. I've noticed it in my ten years of teaching as well as in my personal life as a mom.
teachma is offline  
Old 10-06-2007, 01:11 AM
 
ChristaN's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Colorado
Posts: 3,159
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
My older dd is gifted with sensory issues as well. She does have a SPD dx (over responsive) and we may wind up setting up a 504 plan at school to help her with noise issues.

Dr. James Webb has done some writing on this subject as well. SENG has an excerpt of his book, The misdiagnosis and dual diagnosis of gifted children and adults, on their website:

Quote:
Along with intensity, one typically finds in gifted individuals an extreme sensitivity--to emotions, sounds, touch, taste, etc. These children may burst into tears while watching a sad event on the evening news, keenly hear fluorescent lights, react strongly to smells, insist on having the tags removed from their shirts, must touch everything, or are overly reactive to touch in a tactile-defensive manner.
- http://www.sengifted.org/articles_co...Children.shtml
ChristaN is offline  
Old 10-06-2007, 03:56 AM
 
LynnS6's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Pacific NW longing for the Midwest
Posts: 12,446
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Our son has SPD as well. I'm not sure "how" gifted he is -- definitely not 'profoundly' gifted, but I'm beginning to revise my estimates upward a bit seeing how fast he's moved from kind of reading to fluent reading with expression. We just had his first parent-teacher conference for first grade, and one of the things the teacher said, "Well, it's clear I'm going to have to challenge him more." Umm... yeah. So far the stuff he's brought home have been very easy for him, EXCEPT for the fine motor skills part - which is related to his SPD. And OT is beginning to pay off there - he's actually CHOOSING to draw and write these days. Hooray!

I would highly recommend OT for anyone who can get it. It's made a huge difference for our son. Teachma - one of the things that it's really helped with is his anxiety levels. (I don't think our son's anxiety was ever as bad as your son's, but he definitely has anxious tendencies.) He's just better able to regulate himself. Indeed, our OT talks a lot about self-regulation being one of her key goals. Now the only time he loses it is when he's too tired or too hungry.

The Hoagie's site for the gifted also talks about the hypersensitivities as well. I think it does make neurological sense. Our son just NOTICES things. (Our daughter does too, but very different things!) And then he puts together pieces of information, and makes inferences. You can't do that if you don't notice the info in the first place. The curse is that you can't stop noticing when it gets to be too much.

What I wonder is how many gifted kids are sensory defensive and how many are sensory seekers? Ds is defensive, and dd is looking to be a seeker. (Maybe she can play Quidditch too!)

Lynnteapot2.GIF, academicreading.gif,geek.gif wife, WOHM  to T jog.gif(4/01) and M whistling.gif (5/04)
LynnS6 is offline  
Old 10-06-2007, 06:25 AM
 
eilonwy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Lost
Posts: 15,067
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by LynnS6 View Post
What I wonder is how many gifted kids are sensory defensive and how many are sensory seekers? Ds is defensive, and dd is looking to be a seeker. (Maybe she can play Quidditch too!)
I think that a lot of this varies with personality and available coping mechanisms. For example, most of the time I'm very touch-defensive, but I *love* deep-pressure activities (like being buried in sand, or wearing tight clothing as long as it fits *evenly*, or being wrapped under heavy blankets). It was very easy for me to figure out that the reason BizzyBug was always so eager to take her shoes off was that they were tied too loosely, and that just pulling the laces up and tying them tightly would eliminate the problem, because I am the same way.. .but BizzyBug is very much a seeker. Weird, huh? I've also done the "really loud music in an attempt to desensitize myself" thing which is discussed in many books about SPD.

It was so weird, learning that it had a name... when BizzyBug was diagnosed with it, I had such an epiphany.

Rynna, Mama to Bean (8), Boobah (6), Bella (4) and Bear (2)
eilonwy is offline  
Old 10-06-2007, 08:35 AM
 
teachma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: My new house!
Posts: 4,572
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by LynnS6 View Post

I would highly recommend OT for anyone who can get it. It's made a huge difference for our son. Teachma - one of the things that it's really helped with is his anxiety levels. (I don't think our son's anxiety was ever as bad as your son's, but he definitely has anxious tendencies.) He's just better able to regulate himself. Indeed, our OT talks a lot about self-regulation being one of her key goals. Now the only time he loses it is when he's too tired or too hungry.
I have often thought about this. Ds would not qualify through the public system, and costs for any service in my area are astronomical. Just as an example, I paid $220 for each 45-minute therapy session to treat the anxiety! Insurance eventually reimbursed me, but they reiburse according to "80% of a reasonable cost" for the service, and they felt that $90 was the reasonable cost for a 45-minute therapy session, so I only got back about $70 for each $220 I spent! Fortunately, we only had to do this for 8 months or so until the issues subsided and we felt we could take over at home. So, OT, while probably a good thing for him, is financially out of the question. But it's interesting to hear you confirm my suspicion that this would probably be a good thing for him. Even though he is 7 and we've had a good, long ime to get to know him, ds is still somewhat of a mystery in terms of what sends him over the edge. Sometimes it's obvious, but more often, we can't really figure it out.
teachma is offline  
Old 10-06-2007, 01:21 PM
 
LauraLoo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: By the light of the silvery moon
Posts: 3,679
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Echoing a lot of what has been said......My ds was diagnosed with SPD and also a speech delay related to oral motor issues at age 3. The school would have diagnosed him with austism/aspergers, but clinically, he doesn't meet the criteria regardless of quite a few spectrum traits. Despite his speech delay, his verbal skills are advanced. He is reading, spelling above grade level, but according to his testing, his mathematical skills are higher than his verbal and even stronger visual-spatial skills. He is also very musically inclined and has been taking violin lessons for almost a year because he begged for them. I feel in good company in this forum, but IRL, I don't know of any other child who is like him.

DS also has perfectionistic tendencies and issues with anxiety, so when he is stressed, he looks even more autistic. He is highly sensitive, so when surrounded by people who don't "get" him, it exacerbates his quirkiness.

We did OT for a year, but the therapist wasn't very good at encouraging him to participate - she would force some therapy on him. He didn't like going and I felt that potentially it could be causing more harm. We did work on sensory issues at home, and over time he has made huge progress.

Laura - Mom to ds (10) and dd (7) "Time stands still best in moments that look suspiciously like ordinary life." Brian Andreas.

LauraLoo is offline  
Old 10-06-2007, 03:01 PM
 
LynnS6's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Pacific NW longing for the Midwest
Posts: 12,446
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by teachma View Post
So, OT, while probably a good thing for him, is financially out of the question.
Too bad. I would HIGHLY recommend the book "Sensational Kids" - they talk about the major kinds of SPD and have a set of great ideas there to create a plan for managing the SPD and helping the child. That and the book "The Out of Sync Child has Fun" might enable you to do a lot of things at home to help. Just knowing, for example, that "heavy work" before doing something stressful can help him self regulate can really be a life saver. So, having ds haul out the recycling bins is amazingly calming.

I'm also going to get an exercise trampoline this winter, and install an indoor swing (IKEA has one for about $30 that I can bolt to the beams in the ceiling) in the playroom. Now if I can just find some bars for dd to hang from, we'll be all set!

Lynnteapot2.GIF, academicreading.gif,geek.gif wife, WOHM  to T jog.gif(4/01) and M whistling.gif (5/04)
LynnS6 is offline  
Old 10-07-2007, 07:58 PM
 
quaz's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 1,047
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quick skim, but I didn't notice anyone mention Dabrowski's overexcitiabilities.

Dabrowski's overexcitabilities are more noticeable/occur more often in gifted.

http://www.hoagiesgifted.org/dabrowski.htm



So, a child that has sensual overexitabilities... they may be affected more intensely by sunlight, or water or wind.....


In many ways there is a strong overlap between sensual overexcitabilities and SPD. IMHO, I would think the only difference would be the 'degree'. When the degree gets too extreme, THEN I'd consider it SPD and not OE.


So, while I don't think there is the direct gifted/SPD connection, there is a direct connection from gifted to OE's..... and the similarties of sensual OE's to SPD... well, close.


My five year old I speculate is gifted and hits all 5 OE's strongly. On the sensual side, she freaked with water on her face, too hot, too cold, too itchy, too windy.... etc.

DD#2... not too bad.

My 9m old ds.... he is starting to show potential sensual OE signs. Sensitive to water (screams when his foot hits, no matter the temp), has shown sensitivity to sound, is freaking out when I put socks on him, etc.....

Anyway, the link provides you with various links about OE's.

Tammy
quaz is offline  
Old 10-07-2007, 08:27 PM
 
harmonymama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: In the kitchen making broth
Posts: 653
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Dabrowski's theory seems really important to this discussion.
harmonymama is offline  
Old 10-08-2007, 03:56 PM
crb
 
crb's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 242
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Yeah - Dabrowski!

There have been time that I thought my dd had lots of "issues" (sensitivities), but I think now she is just very sensitive in the OEs. If this really caused a problem in her quality of life, I would consider it SID and seek treatment, so maybe there are a number of people in this situation? I was just discussing this and Aspergers: "on paper" dd does have a lot (5 out of 6?) of characteristics, but not to a degree that would cause disfunction - just enough to be a cool, gifted kid.
crb is offline  
Old 10-08-2007, 08:56 PM
 
quaz's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 1,047
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by crb View Post
Yeah - Dabrowski!

There have been time that I thought my dd had lots of "issues" (sensitivities), but I think now she is just very sensitive in the OEs. If this really caused a problem in her quality of life, I would consider it SID and seek treatment, so maybe there are a number of people in this situation? I was just discussing this and Aspergers: "on paper" dd does have a lot (5 out of 6?) of characteristics, but not to a degree that would cause disfunction - just enough to be a cool, gifted kid.

Yup, that is my oldest... high on all 5 OE's, but not affecting her quality of life... not enough for me to call it SID/SPD.

Anyway, OP, check out Dabrowski's OE's... there is enough info out there that should help you understand a little why so many gifted in your practice have SID/SPD issues.

Btw- I was identified gifted, and had lots of taste/texture issues.... highly picky eater. Issue with water on my face as well.


Tammy
quaz is offline  
Old 10-08-2007, 09:21 PM
 
harmonymama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: In the kitchen making broth
Posts: 653
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
nkm1968- let us know how this all jives with your clinical research!
harmonymama is offline  
Old 10-09-2007, 12:47 AM
 
monkaha's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: Readjusting to the here and now.
Posts: 2,272
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Wow. This is all so very interesting. I think I see DD in some of this.... off to read the links. :

Monica , DH :cop , DD (8) , DS1 (5) , DS2 (2/09) , and the pup
monkaha is offline  
Old 10-09-2007, 12:55 PM
 
ejsmommy's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 389
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by quaz View Post
Yup, that is my oldest... high on all 5 OE's, but not affecting her quality of life... not enough for me to call it SID/SPD.

Anyway, OP, check out Dabrowski's OE's... there is enough info out there that should help you understand a little why so many gifted in your practice have SID/SPD issues.

Btw- I was identified gifted, and had lots of taste/texture issues.... highly picky eater. Issue with water on my face as well.


Tammy
This is interesting to me...we suspected dd may have SPD issues and when she was evaluated we were told no, that she was exhibiting OE's. But sometimes I wonder if the line between the two isn't a bit blurred. Tammy, what you said about having lots of taste/texture issues/picky eating and issues with water on your face is really true for my daughter. It drives me crazy...she practically lives on boxed mac-n-cheese.

Mama to dds, Juju(7) and Bea(4)
ejsmommy is offline  
Old 10-09-2007, 01:48 PM
 
harmonymama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: In the kitchen making broth
Posts: 653
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I don't think there is a clear line. I think it is all about the degree to which it effects the child's functioning.
harmonymama is offline  
Old 10-09-2007, 01:57 PM
 
harmonymama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: In the kitchen making broth
Posts: 653
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Has anyone with gifted children looked at the connection between sensory processing and nutrition? We are trying the feingold diet for ds and considering moving toward gluten-free, casein-free. I believe I am already beginning to see a difference in DS. It makes sense to me that if our children are extremely sensitive to the world around them that would include overexcitability due to the substances in food, and would make the OEs move up to the degree of SPD.
harmonymama is offline  
Old 10-09-2007, 02:10 PM
 
WuWei's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: In the moment
Posts: 11,071
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by harmonymama View Post
Has anyone with gifted children looked at the connection between sensory processing and nutrition? We are trying the feingold diet for ds and considering moving toward gluten-free, casein-free. I believe I am already beginning to see a difference in DS. It makes sense to me that if our children are extremely sensitive to the world around them that would include overexcitability due to the substances in food, and would make the OEs move up to the degree of SPD.
I would say that this summarizes our experience.

We find that HFCS is a factor, more than many other ingredients.

Pat

I have a blog.
WuWei is offline  
Old 10-09-2007, 03:31 PM
 
ejsmommy's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 389
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by harmonymama View Post
Has anyone with gifted children looked at the connection between sensory processing and nutrition? We are trying the feingold diet for ds and considering moving toward gluten-free, casein-free. I believe I am already beginning to see a difference in DS. It makes sense to me that if our children are extremely sensitive to the world around them that would include overexcitability due to the substances in food, and would make the OEs move up to the degree of SPD.
That makes sense to me too! I really want to know more...I feel like I am fumbling around in the dark and want to get a handle on that. Yesterday we noticed dd's OE's ramping up and I just realized she did have a CapriSun at my brother's house on Sat. I bet it had HFCS in it or artificial coloring. DUH!

Thanks Pat and Harmonymama for helping me realize that.

I just looked up the ingredients online...the Roaring Water capri sun that she had does have HFCS! Crud, I am really going to have to be careful...we don't buy this kind of stuff but she gets it other places.

Mama to dds, Juju(7) and Bea(4)
ejsmommy is offline  
Old 10-10-2007, 01:33 AM
 
goomjiji's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 112
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
What an interesting thread. I'm new in this forum and sort of just poking around. My DS seems pretty smart, but who's doesn't? He IS doing some things that seems advanced for his age (he's not quite 3), and I've wondered if he has some sensory issues. I couldn't really nurse him in public situations because he was too interested/overwhelmed with everything going. He's developing filters as he gets older, but I still have to be careful because he gets overstimulated really easy. Sleep. UGH! Sleep. The slightest visual/audio/tactile stimulation or change and it's back to the drawing board. And a pin drop in the neighbor's house will wake him up! I was surprised to find that he doesn't like fingerpainting--doesn't like how the paint feels on his hands. He doesn't seem to have serious sensory issues, but I think there's something there.
goomjiji is offline  
Old 10-10-2007, 11:14 AM
 
Augusta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 206
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Our biggies our artificial colours and flavours, behaviour gets out of control and can't handle anything (crowds, noise, jostling etc).... dairy does a number on his digestive system so we avoid it too but I'm not sure about how the dairy effects him in a sensory way. We haven't tried taking out gluten. Things are under control but that would be the next step if need be. He also seems to handle himself better and better as he gets older. He's just 5 now and is still an introvert and prefers smaller crowds etc but handles school much better and doesn't get as over stimulated as he did when younger. I suspect dietary changes are a big part of that.
Augusta is offline  
Old 10-10-2007, 12:56 PM
 
WuWei's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: In the moment
Posts: 11,071
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
When ds was first introduced to dairy at about age 3.5-4, he would have very aggressive sensory seeking behavior for 1-6 hours after consumption, depending on amount consumed. He'd head butt us for the sensory input if we were standing still, run with arms wide open through the house bumping things, inability to hear other's needs, auditory blocking, loud vocalization, short term memory impairment, impulse control deficit, etc. He'd have huge jumping and bouncing needs for an hour or longer. After continuing more of the of "Healing the Gut" dietary stuff (CO, CLO, probiotics, Mg, etc), he is able to tolerate most any food, except additives, without huge increases in sensory seeking behavior. But, the "dairy dance" is common with dairy, ime.

Oh, we use raw milk now, without issue though.

Here is the link to the "Healing the Gut" Tribe-Cheat Sheet: http://www.mothering.com/discussions...d.php?t=434071



Pat

I have a blog.
WuWei is offline  
Old 10-11-2007, 12:38 PM
 
Augusta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 206
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
We've certainly seen all of those behaviours on occasion. When we cut out the dairy we cut our the additives at the same time so I'm not really sure which foods contributed more to what behaviour. When we slip up or he's away from home and gets a bit of dairy we notice digestive issues right away, also loss of bladder sensation which I've mentioned before. He's been an absolute bear with having had so much food that he normally doesn't get over our thanksgiving weekend (and wetting the bed which we can almost count on when his diet is off). It's almost like a different kid. Even myself I've been feeling awful, less tolerant to noise, irritable etc. I blame dairy for a lot of what ails us off and on in our home. We try to be strict with it but falter from time to time. So I wouldn't be surprised if its the culprit in causing all kinds of behaviours, including sensory integration problems.
Augusta is offline  
Old 10-15-2007, 06:23 PM
 
harmonymama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: In the kitchen making broth
Posts: 653
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Thanks for all the interesting responses to the sensory processing nutrition connection. In the last couple of weeks DS has started vision therapy, occupational therapy, and the Feingold program. I'm not sure what's doing it, but he already seems to be doing so much better, happier, less fidgety, more flexible, listening-- amazing!!
harmonymama is offline  
Old 10-15-2007, 06:44 PM
 
ejsmommy's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 389
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by harmonymama View Post
Thanks for all the interesting responses to the sensory processing nutrition connection. In the last couple of weeks DS has started vision therapy, occupational therapy, and the Feingold program. I'm not sure what's doing it, but he already seems to be doing so much better, happier, less fidgety, more flexible, listening-- amazing!!
That's great! A couple of weeks ago we had about 4 days of that, especially, the more flexible and listening part. I am not sure what happened. I am still trying to figure all this out and haven't officially started Feingold or cut out dairy (dd loves mac-n-cheese). We are being very vigilant about no artificial anything when she is outside of home.

Mama to dds, Juju(7) and Bea(4)
ejsmommy is offline  
Old 10-19-2007, 03:44 AM
 
harmonymama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: In the kitchen making broth
Posts: 653
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Try doing the full Feingold. I'm so glad I payed the membership fee, because it is much more in depth than I realized. There are preservatives in everything- oil, bread, and salicylates even in many fruits and vegetables that get eliminated in stage 1, stuff I never would have figured out on my own. For us, it has been so worth it! We may still cut out gluten and dairy, but for now we are still having them, and it is making a huge difference.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ejsmommy View Post
That's great! A couple of weeks ago we had about 4 days of that, especially, the more flexible and listening part. I am not sure what happened. I am still trying to figure all this out and haven't officially started Feingold or cut out dairy (dd loves mac-n-cheese). We are being very vigilant about no artificial anything when she is outside of home.
harmonymama is offline  
 
User Tag List

Thread Tools


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off