34 wk Preemie nursing great, but nurses saying he shouldn't - Mothering Forums
Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
#1 of 22 Old 09-13-2009, 08:51 AM - Thread Starter
 
NeivaKai's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: On the sea.
Posts: 219
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
My ds was born yesterday and I have been nursing him every 3 hours or so for 10 min. He is latching and getting milk great! But the nurses are telling me that his little tummy can't handle too much so don't feed him when he asks on demand but feed him on a schedule. This is unbelievebly hard! Is this other's experience? It goes against every mothering instinct I have and it is extremely fifficultfor me to do. Also the nurses have been telling me that holding him too much can over stimulate him and cause him to be too tired, which just feels WRONG to me. This NICU world is new to me, so I just don't know who to trust.

doula mama to my turtle love, with a who came when he wanted 9/12/09, 33w 5d, NICU strongman!.
NeivaKai is offline  
#2 of 22 Old 09-13-2009, 11:02 AM
 
ouesi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: SC
Posts: 64
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
My twins were born at 32 weeks, and by 33 weeks, my son was ready to nurse, but the NICU nurses discouraged it :
I was new to the NICU world, new to mothering, new to nursing, and in an area with very few recourses for the kind of attachment parenting that I favor. So basically I let the NICU nurses railroad me. Some can get a little "territorial" about the babies in their care! There are also many wonderful ones out there too!

I don't know your baby's particular conditions, but "in general" I think on demand nursing and as much kangaroo care as possible will only benefit your child. I have learned over the years to trust my instincts as a mother, and if something "feels" wrong, it usually is.

Make sure you are also pumping to keep up your supply
ouesi is offline  
#3 of 22 Old 09-13-2009, 01:45 PM
 
moaningminny's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 240
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I've been there before, and it's very frustrating. NICU staff are very concerned about intake/output so the 3 hour schedule is easier for them to keep up with things. DD's vitals were taken every three hours too, so it seemed as though 3 hours was the magic number.

I talked about this with DD's nurse practitioner. I was frustrated too, because it seemed to me that DD wasn't on their schedule, she was on her own. It got to the point where I was 'allowed' to breastfeed ad lib, and I'd say she was around 34 weeks.

Maybe I'm wrong here, but I would imagine that if your baby couldn't handle feeding on demand he would be vomiting it up? Breastfed babies don't eat more than they need to.

I too was concerned about things such as kangaroo care. It's so confusing, you're told how good it is for your child, yet if you do it too much you're overstimulating them and they'll end up burning more calories and therefore not gaining like 'they' want them too.

You are the biggest advocate for your child. If you feel that your baby needs to be fed differently than the NICU's schedule, do whatever you can to do that. I would also discuss it with someone 'higher up'. I didn't, and had an incredibly difficult time establishing breastfeeding.

Having a preemie is a real rollercoaster ride. It sounds like you're doing a great job!
moaningminny is offline  
#4 of 22 Old 09-13-2009, 05:03 PM
 
Sandstress's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 337
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
DD1 never nursed but I fought with the NICU nurses to keep her out of the isolette and hold her when I wanted to (I even had to have the MD write "orders" that I was allowed to hold her x times a day for x minutes). I think in a healthy 34 weeker who's in the "feeder/grower" level 2 situation... let the weight gain be the guide. You can overstimulate a baby and make them work too hard for their food, but I think NICU nurses overestimate this in more babies than it affects. Also, I don't buy the "tummy can't handle it" argument. If anything, your baby will fall asleep and tire out before she gets overdistended. If the babe is gaining weight appropriately then I would probably fight to keep her out and feed her ad lib.
Sandstress is offline  
#5 of 22 Old 09-13-2009, 06:38 PM
 
Huck's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Oregon
Posts: 191
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by ouesi View Post
I don't know your baby's particular conditions, but "in general" I think on demand nursing and as much kangaroo care as possible will only benefit your child. I have learned over the years to trust my instincts as a mother, and if something "feels" wrong, it usually is.

Make sure you are also pumping to keep up your supply
I agree! I don't think you're going to "overstimulate" your baby by holding him! Holding your baby close, quietly doesn't seem any more stimulating than when you were holding your baby in the womb. It's comforting, especially your baby being able to hear and feel your heartbeat. I would hold him as much as possible and nurse on demand.

Like a pp said, he's your baby and you're his strongest advocate.

Congratulations!:
Huck is offline  
#6 of 22 Old 09-13-2009, 07:19 PM
 
Spiralshell's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Hudson Valley, NY
Posts: 1,056
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Congratulations NeivaKai!
I posted your baby to the October DDC Birth Announcements
Thinking good healthy baby thoughts in your direction! I hope he's getting stronger and stronger. I don't think you can overfeed a baby when you're breastfeeding so trust your instincts for when to feed him. Babies can't read clocks or calendars!
What's his name?

Spiralshell -- Mama to David Nathaniel, born October 2009. And so you see I have come to doubt all that I once held as true. I stand alone without belief, the only truth I know is you.
Spiralshell is offline  
#7 of 22 Old 09-14-2009, 12:18 AM
 
Crunchy Frog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Upstate NY
Posts: 230
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Your baby sounds like he is doing very well, and I hope you are able to get him out of there very quickly.

I don't know what the criteria for release is in your NICU. My boys were born at 33 wks 3 days. The criteria for release at their NICU was that they had to be breathing properly, taking all of their feedings by mouth, and able to maintain their body temperature in an open crib. Your son sounds like he's fairly close to that point already.

I would be assertive with the nurses and make them back up their claims with empirical evidence. For example; with one of my sons it was clear that the nursing was making him tired because he would have desats afterwards. Because your baby's vital signs are being monitored, they should be able to show you that he is being negatively impacted by the nursing. Ditto with the holding.

I honestly can't imagine that there could be a realistic fear of his getting too much of your milk. The more realistic worry at this stage would be his not getting enough. With my babies they weighed the diapers and tested the blood sugar to make sure the intake was sufficient. If he were getting too much, he would be spitting up and having other digestive problems. Again, they should be able to provide you with empirical documentation if there's a problem, and I would demand it of them. Is there anybody at the hospital that you could potentially enlist in your support?

Anyway, I hope he continues to do really well and you can spring him from there and pursue your nursing relationship without alot of bureaucratic restrictions.

Single mom to the Crunchy Froglets, Keith and Carlin, twin boys born 1/30/09. Frozen for 10 years, now unleashed on the world.
Crunchy Frog is offline  
#8 of 22 Old 09-14-2009, 01:02 AM
 
FiveLittleMonkeys's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Paradise
Posts: 367
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
My son was born in June at 33 6/7 weeks. There were definitely some nurses who seemed "territorial" over my baby, and resisted my attempts to come down and nurse him. After about 4 days of this, I finally made sure I was there during rounds, and told the team that unless they could prove to me why it was detrimental to my son to be breastfed first and tube fed if he didn't latch well, that I would be doing all feedings by breast ad lib.

They couldn't, so I did.

Hang in there, mama. You know what is best for your baby! If he doesn't have any issues preventing him nursing, nurse that baby!! Hope you are out of the NICU and home soon!
FiveLittleMonkeys is offline  
#9 of 22 Old 09-14-2009, 01:22 AM
 
sbrinton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Near Seattle
Posts: 1,168
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I would trust your instincts as a mom! It sounds like you are doing the right thing. There is no reason the nurses cannot help you weigh your son before and after he eats for a day or two to make sure he is getting enough milk. If he is, then they can weigh him just once a day to make sure he is growing.

The NICU where our boys were born has always had a schedule, but they are moving towards "on demand" or "cue based" feeding for babies as soon as possible now. They are finding that babies who are fed on demand (or when they show hunger) have fewer problems with feeding later.

Our 35 weeker was able to breastfeed on demand from birth. He was definitely hungry more often than every 3 hours...and he did fine.

Our 31 weeker was not, but by 33-34 weeks, we went from a schedule to on-demand feeding. While we were in the hospital we still roughly followed the 3 hour schedule, but we would adjust it when he seemed hungry earlier.

So.....I think in this case the nurses are wrong. If he is breastfeeding well already, you will probably be home soon?
sbrinton is offline  
#10 of 22 Old 09-14-2009, 10:35 PM
 
AppleCrisp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Posts: 1,525
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Same here....my baby could only nurse for short periods before becoming exhausted and falling asleep, so I wanted to nurse her more often than every 3 hours. They said no... the activity would use up too many calories that she needed to grow (maybe that's what they meant by "over-stimulate?") and being out of the box taxed her ability to stay warm and would also cost her calories. It was awful....sometimes she wasn't hungry when her three hours were due, sometimes she wanted to nurse, rest, nurse, rest and then they'd make me put her back in the box half full and she'd scream.

I would be there for rounds and ask the attending physician to work with you on it. Or, if there's a nurse that is better, see if you can request that one to be your baby's nurse more often.
AppleCrisp is offline  
#11 of 22 Old 09-15-2009, 10:21 PM
 
DocsNemesis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: I make milk..whats your superpower?
Posts: 3,025
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I had to deal with a very overwhelming nurse at our NICU too. All the others were ok but this particular one wouldn't let me hold him, didn't want me touching him in the isolette, nothing. He wasn't *that* preemie either, 33w.

Here's my take on it. Even IF he manages to take more than he should, he'd just spit the excess back up. Every baby is different. My eldest could drink an 8 ounce bottle in one sitting at 3 days old. EIGHT OUNCES! And not spit it back up. Now, he wasnt a preemie but thats still not normal for a newborn. Yet thats how he ate (and then he'd go 5-6 hours in between feedings, resulting in a normal intake).

As far as holding, I cant imagine them sleeping on you being stressful. I could see if they kept staying awake the whole time you were holding them but my ds fell asleep immediately when I'd hold him. He loved it!

I tried to not fight too much in the hospital and waited until he had a different nurse to start holding him a lot and whatnot (he wouldn't nurse so there was no issue at the time with that, BUT our NICU DOES feed them more if they keep acting hungry after feeds or in between feeds). I did take him home AMA about a month after his birth because he'd been stuck in the NICU 2 extra weeks over mild, normal preemie apnea (he was tested, we knew it was normal and not dangerous) due to hospital policy. After he got home, it was amazing. I fed him completely on demand, from bottle at first and then from breast once he figured it out. I held him whenever I could. In a month he gained 4 pounds. He barely gained half a pound in the NICU! It was crazy!

Anyway, if I end up with another preemie, I'll be insisting on holding time and feeding on demand earlier. I'd go with your instincts mama. If he starts losing weight, you can always go back to their way-but I doubt he will. Fighting the will of nurses can be a pain, I hope you have someone else who will back you up, but at the same time, he is YOUR child and they cant stop you from cuddling with him and feeding him.

Cari-mama to Eriq, Lile, Paikea, Kaidyn, and Mieke is here!! 2/9/10
DocsNemesis is offline  
#12 of 22 Old 09-17-2009, 05:20 PM - Thread Starter
 
NeivaKai's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: On the sea.
Posts: 219
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I got them to really pull back, and actually fired a nurse because she was so militant. But now I have to deal with them wanting to put a milk fortifier in, does anyone know about this? He has gone to a tube feeding, and is nursing every few hours, but doing most of his intake through the tube. I feel ok with this for now, as I was getting very worn out trying to get him to take milk every few hours and having him only get a few mL. But the milk fortifier is something else.

doula mama to my turtle love, with a who came when he wanted 9/12/09, 33w 5d, NICU strongman!.
NeivaKai is offline  
#13 of 22 Old 09-17-2009, 05:27 PM
 
sbrinton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Near Seattle
Posts: 1,168
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
NICU's often use HMF (human milk fortefier, which is a type of forumla, not made from human milk) or neosure (preemie forumla) to increase the calorie and mineral content of breastmilk for preemies who were early or small.

There are some upsides to this, but some issues too. Our son developed a milk allergy as a result of his early exposure to milk proteins in the HMF. He also seemed to adjust his intake when he had foritifed breastmilk vs. milk from my breast. When he was about 34-35 weeks and weighed close to 5 pounds, he would only take maybe 33-36 cc from a bottle of fortified milk, but he would take 50-60 cc of breastmilk from me. So in the end, the docs decided that it was better to just let him breastfeed as he was getting plenty of calories that way.
sbrinton is offline  
#14 of 22 Old 09-17-2009, 05:28 PM
 
sbrinton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Near Seattle
Posts: 1,168
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
How much milk is your little one getting at this point? By breast and by tube? How old/big is she?
sbrinton is offline  
#15 of 22 Old 09-17-2009, 07:17 PM - Thread Starter
 
NeivaKai's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: On the sea.
Posts: 219
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
He's eating 40/ml every 3hrs, the max for his weight. He is 34 weeks old gestationally, 6 days out of the womb. He is only 3oz under his birth weight, at this point. He is getting at most 14 ml at the breast, and that's only 3 or 4 times a day. Everything else is by tube.

doula mama to my turtle love, with a who came when he wanted 9/12/09, 33w 5d, NICU strongman!.
NeivaKai is offline  
#16 of 22 Old 09-18-2009, 02:43 PM
 
DocsNemesis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: I make milk..whats your superpower?
Posts: 3,025
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Sbrinton, my ds was the same way. Once we cut out the neosure from his breastmilk, he upped his intake massively. He was a month old by then, but literally almost doubled his intake. It was crazy!

Cari-mama to Eriq, Lile, Paikea, Kaidyn, and Mieke is here!! 2/9/10
DocsNemesis is offline  
#17 of 22 Old 09-18-2009, 06:56 PM
 
ouesi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: SC
Posts: 64
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
This is entirely anecdotal, but here is my experience with HMF.
DS was a big guy even for a twin - 4.6 pounds at 32 weeks. He was a grower and feeder. DD was 3.6 pounds and was the one who had struggled in utero so much (absent end diastolic flow). After 2 weeks of nothing but pumped BM, DD still wasn't "catching up" to DS (who never got the memo he was a preemie and was eating and growing like crazy). Without telling me, they added HMF to DD breastmilk - she wasn't nursing, and the next day she had blood in her stool. At which point everyone panicked, took her off all feeds, pumped her full of antibiotics (in case of NEC - which it turned out not to be) and set her back at least two weeks. I was devastated when I found out they had added to her BM since I felt the BM was protecting them from NEC.
Again, my case could be totally coincidental, but if it were up to me again, unless my kiddo wasn't growing and gaining on BM alone, I wouldn't supplement.
ouesi is offline  
#18 of 22 Old 09-22-2009, 11:40 AM
 
Momof4kidz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 13
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Hi, Im new to this site but not new to being a preemie mom. I have 4 kids, all were born preterm.

My youngest is almost 2 years old and he was born at 32 weeks 3 days by c section. He was doing amazing from the time he was born, only on oxygen for an hour, never had any apnea, bradys, no destats. He had a strong rooting reflex and I was so sure he was ready to take oral feeds. I kept asking and asking every nurse he had to let me try to nurse him; most told me he had to be 34 weeks old before he would be ready. I finally convinced one nurse to let him try; he was 2 days old, 32w 5d gestation. He latched like a pro and nursed for 12 minutes!!

After that I was always asking how he took his bottle, how much he took and so on. I really pushed for them to bottle feed him instead of gavage feed him. By the time he was 4 days old, 33w gestation he was on 100% oral feeds. 2 days later he was moved to an open air crib and he continued to feed well. He was meeting the criteria for discharge, but he was still really young and really small, so again I had to convince them that I could care for him at home.

We had a wonderful nurse who really encouraged breastfeeding and when my little guy was just 8 days old; 33w 4d gestation, he left the NICU behind him forever. He weighed just 3 lbs 10 ozs when I took him home and he absolutley thrived. Once he was home I breastfed him on demand with the acception of 2 bottles of 22 cal breastmilk a day. By the time he was 1 month old he weighed 5 lbs, and at 2 months, he was 7 lbs. He is now 5 days shy of 2 years old, weighs 23.5 pounds and he is still breastfeeding.

You are your babys advocate while in the NICU. Dont be afraid to tell them how you feel and what you want for your baby. They will tell you if there are issues. Best wishes to you, I hope he is home soon
Momof4kidz is offline  
#19 of 22 Old 09-22-2009, 03:51 PM - Thread Starter
 
NeivaKai's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: On the sea.
Posts: 219
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Wow! Your story is inspiring!

I am wondering if we should try to do bottle feeds, as he takes them great, I have just been afraid he won't go to the nipple if I do. He's still not taking all orally, he's still on the gavage and I am getting pretty frustrated. I have been using an SNS but he still only takes 15-20ccs before he conks out. I think if I left him for longer he would get the full feeding, but I have a 2 yr old and I am pumping too...I just am having a hard time balancing. I have the feeling if I was allowed to wear him all the time and nurse him on demand, he would be taking everything from me. But since I am here and he is required to be hooked to machines, and I need to leave to take care of my ds1, I am stuck with their schedule.

Now they are wanting to supplement my milk with some vitamins, but it's carrier is a petroleum oil! It's crazy what they are trying to give kids.

doula mama to my turtle love, with a who came when he wanted 9/12/09, 33w 5d, NICU strongman!.
NeivaKai is offline  
#20 of 22 Old 09-22-2009, 06:25 PM
 
Momof4kidz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 13
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by NeivaKai View Post
Wow! Your story is inspiring!

I am wondering if we should try to do bottle feeds, as he takes them great, I have just been afraid he won't go to the nipple if I do. He's still not taking all orally, he's still on the gavage and I am getting pretty frustrated. I have been using an SNS but he still only takes 15-20ccs before he conks out. I think if I left him for longer he would get the full feeding, but I have a 2 yr old and I am pumping too...I just am having a hard time balancing. I have the feeling if I was allowed to wear him all the time and nurse him on demand, he would be taking everything from me. But since I am here and he is required to be hooked to machines, and I need to leave to take care of my ds1, I am stuck with their schedule.

Now they are wanting to supplement my milk with some vitamins, but it's carrier is a petroleum oil! It's crazy what they are trying to give kids.
((((((hugs)))))) I feel your pain. When my son was in the NICU I had 3 kids at home who needed me. I too was pumping, and it really is a balancing act!! Im sure you already know the benifits from preemie breastmilk, so it goes without saying that pumping is a priority. Do what you have to do as far as housework (this was really hard for me recovering from a c section) and let others help you. If they ask what you need, tell them you need a babysitter or meals or someone to come do some housework. Dont feel a bit bad about getting a little help!!

As far as the bottlefeeding, I told the nurses to go ahead and bottlefeed my babies in the NICU and I would get them nursing at home. I did exactly that. My 3rd baby was born at 33 weeks exactly and she spent 10 days in the NICU. I brought her home at 3 lbs 14 ozs, and she had lost a lot of weight (born at 4 lb 5 oz, went down to 3 lb 8 oz) so they had me giving her only 24 calorie breastmilk until her ped decided she was strong enough to breastfeed. So, for her first MONTH of life she was bottlefed, and after that I sucesfully breastfed her for 2 years and 7 months. She never had a drop of formula in her life, so I know it can be done!! I would be happy to help you with this if I can. Please feel free to email me at ruchil7aolcom@gmail.com anytime with anything I can help with.

If your little guy is tiring out before finishing his full feeds then he just isnt ready yet. Is he having any spells? Is he in an open air crib? How much does he weigh now? Is he refluxing? All these things are important when it comes to nippling. If he isnt ready to feed and they force him he will expend extra energy and lose weight of have spells of o2 desats, apnea or bradys. I know how frustrating it is, but he does need to take his time learning this skill. There are ways to help him stay awake, but again, only if his little body is ready. Im sorry this is so long, but I really hope it helps you
Momof4kidz is offline  
#21 of 22 Old 09-22-2009, 11:27 PM
 
sbrinton's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Near Seattle
Posts: 1,168
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Are you using a nipple shield when you try to breastfeed?

That made a huge difference for us. It's much easier for preemies to stay latched on to the breast with the nipple shield. They can relax while eating without the nipple falling out of their mouth, so they don't have to expend so much energy.

I think using the nipple shield also makes it a little easier for the LOs to switch between breast and bottle.

We used a nipple shield in the NICU and when we were home until we were a few weeks past Zeph's due date. We stopped when I was confident he was strong enough to nurse without it...and sort of let him get hungry enough to figure out breastfeeding without the shield. He did, and he's still nursing great 10 months later!
sbrinton is offline  
#22 of 22 Old 09-24-2009, 01:21 PM
 
DocsNemesis's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: I make milk..whats your superpower?
Posts: 3,025
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
One thing I would note is if he's allowed to nurse on demand, watch how often he eats on his own. When we came home and I let my ds make his own schedule, first via bottle and then via breast (I was like a pp and didn't even try nursing in the hospital more than a few times, it just wasn't going well for us-he learned how to nurse on his due date), he would take much smaller amounts and crash, but either wake up on his own to eat some more within an hour, or I would wake him up to eat. If he was REALLY out, I just left him alone-I figured he needed the sleep then. But most of the time waking him up wasn't hard. He'd fall back to sleep within 10 minutes, but still take a couple ounces of milk before hand.

If he's still really sleepy and hard to wake up, then he probably isn't ready to be completely bottle or breast fed. Especially with the breast, its so comforting they tend to fall asleep even faster. I would still be giving it a go as much as possible since he already has the hang of it, but he might just need more growing time before he's ready to go completely to breast. Like I said, my son was still very sleepy but there was a difference between when he was a week old and impossible to wake up at all and a month old when he could be woken up fairly easily and eat for a bit before falling back to sleep.

(I just remembered trying to nurse him for the first time at about a week old and him latching on, sucking twice, and then completely falling back to sleep )

Cari-mama to Eriq, Lile, Paikea, Kaidyn, and Mieke is here!! 2/9/10
DocsNemesis is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Mothering Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off