Vaccinating preteen for the first time? - Mothering Forums
Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
#1 of 12 Old 06-22-2010, 02:34 PM - Thread Starter
 
sioleabha's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Houston
Posts: 235
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Except for my oldest daughter, none of our children have ever received any vaccinations. (I think my daughter just got whatever they give at the first appointment -- I'm not sure because I wasn't her mom yet, then, but I can find out of course.) My general feeling has always been that it's best not to meddle with our bodies, and that we shouldn't take any medication unless there is a compelling reason to do so. (My bar is not *very* high -- I personally choose not to take pain medication if pain is manageable, but I have no problem giving my child Tylenol for a headache, etc.) So far, I have no seen any compelling reason to give vaccinations -- I don't see the potential benefits as outweighing the potential risks.

Well, today my husband called and asked me to research what vaccines are typically given to preteens (which would be our oldest two children). He's been thinking and doing some research that suggests that there is less risk from the vaccines at this age, and he thinks that, at the very least, a tetanus shot would be a good idea. (My kids are pretty rough & tumble, and get cuts and scrapes, and he thinks tetanus might be an actual risk for them.) But the only information I can find that is not geared towards babies and toddlers is a CDC chart that doesn't give very much detail (http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/recs/sch...chedule-pr.pdf).

The CDC seems to recommend:

Tetanus, Diphtheria, and Pertussis -- We want the tetanus shot, since that's what lead my husband to think about this in the first place. (We've already had to take my oldest son for one since he stepped on a rusty nail, but I think he'll need a booster by now.) What do you think of the diphtheria and pertussis? Dr. Sears says that it's unlikely for a small child to catch diphtheria, but is it more likely for an older child? And would it be as serious in an older child? He says that pertussis is serious for a child under 1 -- is it worth worrying about in a 12 year old? And can you get these vaccines unbundled if you don't want all three?

HPV -- We are absolutely *not* interested in this one.

Meningococcal -- The CDC chart says administer at age 13 for children who have not previously been vaccinated. Is this the meningitis vaccine? Dr. Sears says meningitis is rare after the age of 2, but the CDC charts seem to get *more* concerned about it the older the child is, including recommending it to college freshman if they've not been previously vaccinated. Plus, all of the cases of meningitis I have ever heard in the news were teenagers. Am I reading Dr. Sears wrong here?

Influenza -- Seems ridiculous to me, honestly. Our family *rarely* gets the flu, anyway.

Hep B -- The CDC recommends this since our children haven't had it yet, and Dr. Sears recommends it for teenagers, but this is an STD. It seems incredibly unlikely that my homeschooled 11 and 12 year olds (who aren't even *interested* in dating yet) would need this vaccine. Surely, if we decided to do this one, it could be delayed a bit longer?

Polio -- Again, the CDC recommends this since our children never had it, but it seems ridiculous to me. I didn't even have a polio shot as a kid.

Measles, Mumps, Rubella -- Recommended because our kids never had it, Dr. Sears recommends it *after* a blood test to ensure that they don't already have immunity. Personally, I am concerned about the rubella vaccine. I know that it's very important that pregnant women are not exposed to rubella, and I know that adults rarely keep up with their booster shots. Wouldn't it be safer for my children to develop a natural immunity to rubella to ensure that they don't end up catching it as adults of child-bearing age (including my sons -- I expect them to have pregnant wives one day!) Also, can you get these shots unbundled?

Chickenpox -- I notice that the CDC chart only lists this as "varicella," and doesn't mention *anywhere* that varicella *is* chickenpox. Should I give them the benefit of the doubt that they assume that parents know that already? I have the same concerns with this as with rubella. My kids have never caught chickenpox (though I know that they may have developed immunity anyway), and I am concerned about giving them temporary immunity during the years when the disease is the least serious only for them to catch it as adults because they failed to keep up with their booster shots. However, it seems like everyone I know has their child vaccinated against chickenpox (in fact, the only family we know whose kids *got* chickenpox had been vaccinated), so I'm also concerned that it's not likely for them to ever catch it.

Hmmm, writing all of that out helped me think. Seems like we probably want tetanus, maybe meningococcal (but not for another year or two), will consider MMR/varicella after a blood test, and I don't know about diphtheria and pertussis. Any information or advice you could give me would be very helpful!

Michelle, Christian , sahm, homeschooling , breastfeeding , no vax, blogging , photographer mom with ADD and Social Anxiety Disorder Mom to 4 boys, 3 girls.
sioleabha is offline  
#2 of 12 Old 06-22-2010, 02:48 PM
 
hollytheteacher's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 3,009
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
If it were me, i'd give my preteen the DT shot (which is diptheria and Tetnus) and the hep B (in my opinion pre-teen is the right age to do it--i had it at 13)

me, dh and 2 boys = our family (oh and a cat...who is also a male...lol)
hollytheteacher is offline  
#3 of 12 Old 06-22-2010, 02:49 PM
 
carriebft's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 6,947
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
My thoughts would be:

chicken pox:
-can be pretty complicated in risky to get infected later in life
-can seriously affect a pregnancy if you happen to get it then
-I would check for immunity first and then either try for exposure asap or get the vaccine

Meningococcal: this vaccine covers strains that cause meningitis that are not found in the infant/children vaccines (hib and prevnar). Men C, for example, is more common in kids 12-17, with the highest death rate occurring in ages 1-5 and then that 12-17 window (some countries actually show 12-17 with higher death rates than 1-5).
-our kids will get this when they get older.

DTaP:
-this vaccine comes in DTaP, DT, or just T-- but, honestly, looking at the side effects of DT and T, I would just get DTaP myself. P is not very risky for older kids but can still cause prolonged illness, broken ribs, etc. but most deaths occur under the age of 1.
-D is not found in this country, but we travel to endemic areas so we like that protection.

MMR:
- no longer available as single shots
- I would check for immunity and then get it if needed for rubella, though the disease is rare here there are still outbreaks. There was an outbreak in nehterlands that traveled to canada in 2005-- it caused 2 fetal deaths and 14 cases of congenital rubella.
-I also like the measles protection

"Parents are simply trustees; they do not own the bodies of their children"-Norm Cohen  Martial arts instructor intactlact.gifhomebirth.jpgnak.gif and mom to 4: DD1 (1/05) DS (7/06) DD2 (5/08) DD3 (2/11)
carriebft is offline  
#4 of 12 Old 06-22-2010, 03:02 PM
 
ammiga's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 1,116
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Tetanus: If your kids haven't contracted a case of tetanus in over a decade of rough and tumble play time, why are you (or your dh) worried that they will get it now? If they were diabetic, or elderly, or suffered from circulatory issues, then maybe it would be something to consider. But if they are healthy normal kids and you know how to properly clean out any wounds that might lead to an increased risk of tetanus, I wouldn't worry about it.

Hep B: I still haven't had one, neither has my dh, or any other adult that I know of. Maybe talk about this with your kids as part of sex education, whenever you do that, and go from there.

MMR: blood tests don't always show immunity, even if immunity exists. Natural immunity is definitely the best form of immunity. I think the only danger time for a pregnant woman to contract rubella is the first trimester. I know pregnant women do catch it, but odds of them catching it in that 8 week window seem pretty low. I'm not scared of measles any more than chicken pox.

Chicken pox: I don't quite understand raising the risk of shingles and other risks associated with vaccinating in order to avoid a disease that is mostly an inconvenience. I've known adults who had cp. They were unhappy, but fine.

Diphtheria: I wouldn't worry about this disease in the US in the slightest.
ammiga is offline  
#5 of 12 Old 06-22-2010, 03:07 PM - Thread Starter
 
sioleabha's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Houston
Posts: 235
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by ammiga View Post
MMR: blood tests don't always show immunity, even if immunity exists. Natural immunity is definitely the best form of immunity. I think the only danger time for a pregnant woman to contract rubella is the first trimester. I know pregnant women do catch it, but odds of them catching it in that 8 week window seem pretty low. I'm not scared of measles any more than chicken pox.
If the kids already have a natural immunity, but it doesn't show up on the titer test, getting the shot won't compromise their natural immunity, right? It would just be pointless.

Michelle, Christian , sahm, homeschooling , breastfeeding , no vax, blogging , photographer mom with ADD and Social Anxiety Disorder Mom to 4 boys, 3 girls.
sioleabha is offline  
#6 of 12 Old 06-22-2010, 03:11 PM
 
carriebft's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 6,947
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
yeah if you already had rubella immunity and you got the shot, it would not affect that immunity negatively.

"Parents are simply trustees; they do not own the bodies of their children"-Norm Cohen  Martial arts instructor intactlact.gifhomebirth.jpgnak.gif and mom to 4: DD1 (1/05) DS (7/06) DD2 (5/08) DD3 (2/11)
carriebft is offline  
#7 of 12 Old 06-22-2010, 03:19 PM
 
hollytheteacher's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 3,009
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
As i understand it, children over 11 cannot get dtap only dt

me, dh and 2 boys = our family (oh and a cat...who is also a male...lol)
hollytheteacher is offline  
#8 of 12 Old 06-22-2010, 03:19 PM
 
carriebft's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 6,947
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
this study looks at tetanus in under 15s between 1992-2000. They found 15 cases, so you can see how rare it is.

http://pediatrics.aappublications.or.../full/109/1/e2

"Parents are simply trustees; they do not own the bodies of their children"-Norm Cohen  Martial arts instructor intactlact.gifhomebirth.jpgnak.gif and mom to 4: DD1 (1/05) DS (7/06) DD2 (5/08) DD3 (2/11)
carriebft is offline  
#9 of 12 Old 06-22-2010, 03:21 PM
 
carriebft's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 6,947
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
It is called Tdap-- the one that is licensed for 10+ years. That is the one I received as my booster. I believe the brands are adacel and boostrix. (edit- yeah these are the ones; they both have information on using them without having a prior DTaP record as well)

"Parents are simply trustees; they do not own the bodies of their children"-Norm Cohen  Martial arts instructor intactlact.gifhomebirth.jpgnak.gif and mom to 4: DD1 (1/05) DS (7/06) DD2 (5/08) DD3 (2/11)
carriebft is offline  
#10 of 12 Old 06-22-2010, 03:44 PM - Thread Starter
 
sioleabha's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Houston
Posts: 235
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Wow! I posted my question to Dr. Sears' vaccination message board, and I got an answer from the good doctor almost right away!

Quote:
DR. Bob Answers by DR. Bob - posted on 6/22/2010

The only diseases that could be tough now or as they get older and that are common enough to consider a risk would be Cpox and Mumps (but you can't get Mumps vax by itself - has to be MMR). Also, Hep B and HPV if sexual activity is likely. And Meningococcal vaccine and tetanus. You can review those diseases and the vaccines in the book.

Michelle, Christian , sahm, homeschooling , breastfeeding , no vax, blogging , photographer mom with ADD and Social Anxiety Disorder Mom to 4 boys, 3 girls.
sioleabha is offline  
#11 of 12 Old 06-22-2010, 04:52 PM
 
ammiga's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 1,116
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Cool that he answered! Although, I think it's weird that he finds tetanus common enough to consider a risk. They're still in an age range where I think cp and mumps are an inconvenience, and nothing to worry about. I wouldn't really worry about them no matter what, but especially not as preteens and teens.
ammiga is offline  
#12 of 12 Old 06-22-2010, 05:24 PM
Banned
 
stik's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 1,942
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Just wanted to respond to this part:

Quote:
Hep B -- The CDC recommends this since our children haven't had it yet, and Dr. Sears recommends it for teenagers, but this is an STD. It seems incredibly unlikely that my homeschooled 11 and 12 year olds (who aren't even *interested* in dating yet) would need this vaccine. Surely, if we decided to do this one, it could be delayed a bit longer?
Vaccinations for STDs are most effective if given prior to any sexual contact. So if you are considering vaccination because you and/or your dh believe that vaccination will protect your children from disease, the best time for this one really is prior to any interest in sexual activity. Discussing sexual activity and sexual desire is very uncomfortable for many children and young adults, so while I don't doubt that your 11 and 12 year-olds are genuinely not interested, many children behave as though they are disinterested in sex around their parents well past the point where they are engaged in active exploration. If you wait until your kids appear to be interested in sex, you will probably be waiting past the point where they become sexually active.
stik is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Drag and Drop File Upload
Drag files here to attach!
Upload Progress: 0
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Mothering Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off