I want to start selectively vaxing my 5 year old. - Mothering Forums

Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
Old 11-25-2006, 04:14 PM - Thread Starter
 
boston's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Maine
Posts: 959
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I have no idea how to do this. She's only had one tetanus shot, once. (I think it also contained diptheria.)

I'm interested in the Dtap (or Tdap, whatever it is now.)
How many doses would a 5 year old need, in order to be vaccinated?
boston is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 11-25-2006, 04:27 PM
 
Blue Dragonfly's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 1,004
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I liked this info:

http://www.lewrockwell.com/******/miller15.html
Blue Dragonfly is offline  
Old 11-25-2006, 04:44 PM - Thread Starter
 
boston's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Maine
Posts: 959
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Thanks. I have this article. I'm looking for slightly more specific information about starting at or around age 5. Has anyone done this and care to share about it?
boston is offline  
Old 11-25-2006, 05:21 PM
 
mamakay's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: in la la land, or so they say...
Posts: 8,332
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)
What are your reasons for wanting to start vaxing?

I'm going to begin selevtively vaxing at some point later, and here's what I'm thinking:

1) I think I want to do Rubella, just because I would never forgive myself if my son caught it and gave it to a pregnant woman. Rubella is one of the only diseases "herd immunity" seems to work for without any weird negative effects happening. (erm...except the whole natural immunity in childhood thing, which would be ideal, but I think we're past a point of no return on that one.)

2)Maybe Measles. I'm not afraid of the disease hurting my own child, but I do think "herd immunity" is protecting immunocompromised kids here..and measles actually could be globally eradicated....I think.

Mumps portion isn't working, so scratch that component..it's a mild disease anyway.
Hep A- too mild to vax for
Hep B- I'll reconsider that one when he's a teen
DtaP- vax doesn't work (pertussis portion, at least. I might want to get it for the tetanus part later...but tetanus being so rare, I'm not in a hurry)

Hib and Prevnar- "herd immunity" doing really bad stuff with these ones, causing new bacteria to emerge as pathogens...and the vax only has a big positive effect in infancy, so scratch those.

Chickenpox- will do a titre check around age 10ish, and vax then if not immune.

IPV- No point.
mamakay is offline  
Old 11-25-2006, 05:36 PM - Thread Starter
 
boston's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Maine
Posts: 959
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamakay View Post
What are your reasons for wanting to start vaxing?
I would like some "protection" against Pertussis. It's the only disease that there's a vaccine for that actually worries me. My kid is about to enter a large public school next year.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mamakay View Post
1) I think I want to do Rubella, just because I would never forgive myself if my son caught it and gave it to a pregnant woman. Rubella is one of the only diseases "herd immunity" seems to work for without any weird negative effects happening. (erm...except the whole natural immunity in childhood thing, which would be ideal, but I think we're past a point of no return on that one.)
That's interesting. My plan with Ruebella is to wait until my daughter hits puberty, and then have her get the vaccine, should she not have natural immunity by then. I think as adults, women ought to be responsible for their own health during pregnancy, not the children in their community. When I was pregnant I got checked to see if I was immune. I wasn't. Despite being "up to date" on my shots. I still had a healthy baby, thankfully.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mamakay View Post
2)Maybe Measles. I'm not afraid of the disease hurting my own child, but I do think "herd immunity" is protecting immunocompromised kids here..and measles actually could be globally eradicated....I think.
I'm not afraid of measles. Both my parents had it as kids. I haven't heard of it being dangerous.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mamakay View Post
Mumps portion isn't working, so scratch that component..it's a mild disease anyway.
Hep A- too mild to vax for
Hep B- I'll reconsider that one when he's a teen
DtaP- vax doesn't work (pertussis portion, at least. I might want to get it for the tetanus part later...but tetanus being so rare, I'm not in a hurry)
I have given my daughter one vaccine, and that was Tetanus. We live in Maine. It's too possible that she'll be barefoot and get a puncture wound. And the treatment for that is --a tetanus shot. One that is worse (tocicity-wise) than the vaccine. So I got her the vaccine.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mamakay View Post
Chickenpox- will do a titre check around age 10ish, and vax then if not immune.
I have to find out how the chickenpox thing works. At what point does chickenpox start becoming more dangerous? That's when I'd want to get her vaccinated, if she's not naturally immune.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mamakay View Post
IPV- No point.
Yeah, I don't see this as a concern, unless we travel to a place where Polio exists.
boston is offline  
Old 11-25-2006, 05:54 PM
 
LongIsland's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: New York
Posts: 10,813
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by boston View Post
I'm interested in the Dtap (or Tdap, whatever it is now.)
How many doses would a 5 year old need, in order to be vaccinated?
The CDC recommends five (5) doses of DTaP. The first three doses of are the primary doses and anything after that are boosters.

Time interval between doses for a five year old child:

Dose 1-2: four weeks
Dose 2-3: four weeks
Dose 3-4: six months
Dose 4-5: six months

Are you looking to get the CDC recommended number of doses or the number of doses required for school entry in your state?
LongIsland is offline  
Old 11-25-2006, 06:03 PM - Thread Starter
 
boston's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Maine
Posts: 959
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by LongIsland View Post
Are you looking to get the CDC recommended number of doses or the number of doses required for school entry in your state?
Niether. She won't be fully vaccinated so it doesn't matter if she has what the school wants her to have. I'm doing a philosophical exemption. And I don't particularly trust the CDC so what they recommend isn't my main concern. I just want to know what it takes to make the shot work the best it can. What is ideal, medically speaking.
boston is offline  
Old 11-25-2006, 06:05 PM
 
Tracy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: "It's Chinatown, Jake"
Posts: 11,702
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
I would like some "protection" against Pertussis. It's the only disease that there's a vaccine for that actually worries me. My kid is about to enter a large public school next year.
how old is your youngest child?

Check out New Moon on my Astrology Site

http://tracyastrosalon.blogspot.com/

 

Tracy is offline  
Old 11-25-2006, 06:08 PM - Thread Starter
 
boston's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Maine
Posts: 959
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I have just one. A 5 year old.
boston is offline  
Old 11-25-2006, 06:11 PM
 
LongIsland's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: New York
Posts: 10,813
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by boston View Post
I just want to know what it takes to make the shot work the best it can. What is ideal, medically speaking.
Technically, three doses would be considered "vaccinated." However, as you can see from the number of boosters recommended so close to the primary series in childhood, then shortly thereafter in adolescence and adulthood, this vaccine is not exactly what many would consider to be efficacious.

I really can't answer your question. Truthfully and to put it bluntly - this vax sucks.
LongIsland is offline  
Old 11-25-2006, 06:17 PM
 
LongIsland's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: New York
Posts: 10,813
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
....
LongIsland is offline  
Old 11-25-2006, 06:31 PM
 
spero's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: the back of beyond
Posts: 9,488
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by boston View Post
I would like some "protection" against Pertussis. It's the only disease that there's a vaccine for that actually worries me. My kid is about to enter a large public school next year.
My understanding is that pertussis is only a big concern in an infant - when they're too young to get the vax anyway. And there are outbreaks amongst vaxed kids in schools just about every year.

Isn't the Dtap supposed to be one of the most reactive vaccines out there?


Quote:
That's interesting. My plan with Ruebella is to wait until my daughter hits puberty, and then have her get the vaccine, should she not have natural immunity by then.
Momtezuma Tuatara has an interesting story to tell about rubella, natural immunity, and pgy.


Quote:
I have given my daughter one vaccine, and that was Tetanus. We live in Maine. It's too possible that she'll be barefoot and get a puncture wound. And the treatment for that is --a tetanus shot. One that is worse (tocicity-wise) than the vaccine. So I got her the vaccine.
You are aware that letting a puncture wound bleed clean kills tetanus, right?


Quote:
I have to find out how the chickenpox thing works. At what point does chickenpox start becoming more dangerous? That's when I'd want to get her vaccinated, if she's not naturally immune.
I'm not sure I'd say it becomes more dangerous, just harder to deal with.


Quote:
Yeah, I don't see this as a concern, unless we travel to a place where Polio exists.
If I'm not mistaken, polio still exists right here in the US - right?

Every baptized Christian is, or should be, someone with an actual (disturbing) experience, ... a close encounter, with God; someone who, as a result, becomes a disturbing presence to others. - Fr. Anthony J. Gittins, A Presence That Disturbs
spero is offline  
Old 11-25-2006, 07:05 PM
 
mamakay's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: in la la land, or so they say...
Posts: 8,332
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)
Quote:
I would like some "protection" against Pertussis. It's the only disease that there's a vaccine for that actually worries me. My kid is about to enter a large public school next year.
You probably want to just look at the seroconversion rate. From what I remember, around 75% of kids seroconvert with the first dose, around 85 % by the second dose, and around 90% with the third.
I'll try to find the DtaP package insert to find out for sure. The tests are done on infants, but it should be about the same for a five year old.

Quote:
That's interesting. My plan with Ruebella is to wait until my daughter hits puberty, and then have her get the vaccine, should she not have natural immunity by then. I think as adults, women ought to be responsible for their own health during pregnancy, not the children in their community. When I was pregnant I got checked to see if I was immune. I wasn't. Despite being "up to date" on my shots. I still had a healthy baby, thankfully.
Just an FYI...the rate of adverse reactions (weirdo arthritis syndromes) to the Rubella vax are highest in girls who are going through puberty or have already gone through it, so if I had a girl and I was wanting her immune before pregnancy, I'd probably want to get the vax before puberty for that reason. JMO.
mamakay is offline  
Old 11-25-2006, 07:29 PM
 
LongIsland's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: New York
Posts: 10,813
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamakay View Post
You probably want to just look at the seroconversion rate. From what I remember, around 75% of kids seroconvert with the first dose, around 85 % by the second dose, and around 90% with the third.
Are there any seroconversion rates for the fourth and fifth booster doses?

Obviously the seroconversion rates for this vax begin to plummet pretty much as soon as the needle comes out of skin, YKWIM?
LongIsland is offline  
Old 11-25-2006, 07:41 PM
 
Fyrestorm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: Connecticut
Posts: 3,766
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by skellbelle View Post


If I'm not mistaken, polio still exists right here in the US - right?
Only from the OPV vaccine...hasn't been a case of wild polio in the US in over 20 years.

Victim of Birth Rape & Coerced ribboncesarean.gifUnnecesareanribboncesarean.gif What makes people think they can cut up someone else's genitals? nocirc.gif
Fyrestorm is offline  
Old 11-25-2006, 09:13 PM
 
mamakay's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: in la la land, or so they say...
Posts: 8,332
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by LongIsland View Post
Are there any seroconversion rates for the fourth and fifth booster doses?

Obviously the seroconversion rates for this vax begin to plummet pretty much as soon as the needle comes out of skin, YKWIM?
I'm having a really hard time finding the seroconversion rates for fewer than 3 doses. Even the package insert only mentions the rate after the 3rd dose.

Weird.

I'll keep looking.
mamakay is offline  
Old 11-25-2006, 09:41 PM
 
wonderwahine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: wi fi didnt do it!
Posts: 9,295
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fyrestorm View Post
Only from the OPV vaccine...hasn't been a case of wild polio in the US in over 20 years.
that they know of.......no paralytic polio, but 95% of people have polio and never even knew it, it just causes flu like symptoms.
wonderwahine is offline  
Old 11-25-2006, 10:18 PM
 
mamakay's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: in la la land, or so they say...
Posts: 8,332
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)
Haha...I just figured out why they aren't real keen on using seroconversion tests for pertussis vaxes:
They don't know what's going on at all. They don't know which components (the different toxoids, bacterial antigens, etc.) give protection, if some are worthless, etc. They just have no idea, so they put a little bit of everything in there and hope for the best.

So, we're left with placebo controlled trials for efficacy. Here's the best I could find:
http://cat.inist.fr/?aModele=afficheN&cpsidt=3699171

Quote:
The vaccine efficacy after two doses was 55 percent (95 percent confidence interval, 12 to 78 percent), on the basis of 14 cases in the DTP-toxoids group and 31 in the DT-toxoids group that met the definition of the World Health Organization. Conclusions. A pharmacologically inert, acellular pertussis-toxoid vaccine that is easily standardized is safe and confers substantial protection against pertussis.
The American acellular vaccines are based on the Swedish ones, and there haven't been any placebo controlled trials on ours, but the Swedish trial are used as the expectation basis.
So, 2 doses cuts the risk of pertussis in half. My wild guess is that one dose does about the same thing, and 5 doses probably doesn't bring it up much from there, either. But it looks like nobody's studied what happens with one dose. So who knows?
I have read that 5 doses can bring the efficacy up to as high as 80%.
So maybe the protection goes up 10% with each shot after the second? Or maybe one dose would only provide 40% protection?
I dunno.
It sucks that this hasn't really been figured out in some logical way.
mamakay is offline  
Old 11-25-2006, 11:14 PM - Thread Starter
 
boston's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Maine
Posts: 959
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by skellbelle View Post
My understanding is that pertussis is only a big concern in an infant - when they're too young to get the vax anyway. And there are outbreaks amongst vaxed kids in schools just about every year.
I think it's still a concern with older kids and some adults. Side note: we have a family member with type 1 Diabetes and I really want to avoid infecting him with Pertussis if we can help it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by skellbelle View Post
Isn't the Dtap supposed to be one of the most reactive vaccines out there?
Yes. It's pretty nasty. But this chart {http://www.vaccinesafety.edu/thi-table.htm} shows that these vaccines at least do not have Mercury in them. I'd like to know where I can find any evidence that the dtap is worse than other thermerisol-free vaccines.

Quote:
Originally Posted by skellbelle View Post
You are aware that letting a puncture wound bleed clean kills tetanus, right?
That's great but it's not very likely to work for my family. We're too excited by blood.

Quote:
Originally Posted by skellbelle View Post
I'm not sure I'd say it becomes more dangerous, just harder to deal with.
I know people who've had varicella as adults who've been very sick from it. Hospitalized for a couple weeks in one case. That's certainly harder to deal with!

Quote:
Originally Posted by skellbelle View Post
If I'm not mistaken, polio still exists right here in the US - right?
No one's reporting being sick from it at least.
boston is offline  
Old 11-25-2006, 11:16 PM - Thread Starter
 
boston's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Maine
Posts: 959
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamakay View Post
Just an FYI...the rate of adverse reactions (weirdo arthritis syndromes) to the Rubella vax are highest in girls who are going through puberty or have already gone through it, so if I had a girl and I was wanting her immune before pregnancy, I'd probably want to get the vax before puberty for that reason. JMO.
Thank you for this information. I hadn't heard that before...
boston is offline  
Old 11-25-2006, 11:18 PM
 
wonderwahine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: wi fi didnt do it!
Posts: 9,295
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Isn't the Dtap supposed to be one of the most reactive vaccines out there?
from what I've read, yes, but i think its more in the newborns/toddler thing than a 5yr old. Its linked to SIDS and other things.
wonderwahine is offline  
Old 11-25-2006, 11:19 PM - Thread Starter
 
boston's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Maine
Posts: 959
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamakay View Post
I have read that 5 doses can bring the efficacy up to as high as 80%.
So maybe the protection goes up 10% with each shot after the second? Or maybe one dose would only provide 40% protection?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Immunization Action Coalition
How effective is this vaccine?
In general, inactivated vaccines are not as effective in producing immunity as are live vaccines. In studies of acellular pertussis vaccine, children who received three or four doses were 80%-85% less likely to develop pertussis than unvaccinated children. Immunity appears to last for five to 10 years. Tdap vaccine is believed to be similar in effectiveness and duration of immunity as pediatric DTaP vaccines.
I think I want to aim for 4 doses.

http://www.vaccineinformation.org/pertuss/qandavax.asp
boston is offline  
Old 11-25-2006, 11:22 PM - Thread Starter
 
boston's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Maine
Posts: 959
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by romans_mum View Post
that they know of.......no paralytic polio, but 95% of people have polio and never even knew it, it just causes flu like symptoms.
Do you have a source for this?
boston is offline  
Old 11-25-2006, 11:23 PM - Thread Starter
 
boston's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Maine
Posts: 959
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by romans_mum View Post
from what I've read, yes, but i think its more in the newborns/toddler thing than a 5yr old. Its linked to SIDS and other things.
Right. This is what I learned, too. That's partially why I wanted to wait until my kid was way out of the toddler woods.
boston is offline  
Old 11-25-2006, 11:25 PM
 
wonderwahine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: wi fi didnt do it!
Posts: 9,295
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
that of course doesnt mean its impossible for it to react in an adult.....I guess we will have more reports on that since they are pushing the vax in adults now.
wonderwahine is offline  
Old 11-26-2006, 12:27 AM
 
mamakay's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: in la la land, or so they say...
Posts: 8,332
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)
Just an FYI, the Immunization Action Coalition is a very, very suspect source.
I'm not saying the 85% figure is necessarily wrong, but you might want to check their sources.

Here's a link on why the pertussis vaccine doesn't work very well.
(the bacteria is smarter than our immune systems).
http://iai.asm.org/cgi/content/full/68/12/7152


Quote:
It is becoming clear that B. pertussis bacteria are capable of infecting and proliferating in a large proportion of vaccinated individuals. In one study, 33% of the exposed individuals receiving the highly effective five-component acellular pertussis vaccine had evidence of infection and 24% coughed for 21 days or more (19). In the same study, 82% of individuals receiving a licensed whole-cell vaccine had evidence of infection and 65% coughed for 21 days or more
I really, really don't think the IAC's numbers are right.
mamakay is offline  
Old 11-26-2006, 12:47 AM
 
mamakay's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: in la la land, or so they say...
Posts: 8,332
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by boston View Post
Do you have a source for this?
http://www.cdc.gov/nip/publications/pink/polio.pdf

Quote:
Up to 95% of all polio infections are inapparent or
asymptomatic. Estimates of the ratio of inapparent to
paralytic illness vary from 50:1 to 1,000:1 (usually 200:1).
Regarding the differences between the 50:1 and 1000:1 ratios, I think it's probably safe to assume that extreme starvation probably pushes people closer to the 50:1 side, and extreme good health pushes you to the 1000:1 side.
mamakay is offline  
Old 11-26-2006, 12:57 AM
 
alegna's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 42,826
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Just FYI- I am reactive/ allergic to the tetanus. I think it's more common than people think. Watch for swelling, redness and reduced movement in the limb injected. If there is a reaction, do NOT give more doses. My reactions got worse and worse while they narrowed it down to the tetanus (kept giving it to me....) : :

-Angela
alegna is offline  
Old 11-26-2006, 04:22 AM
 
LongIsland's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: New York
Posts: 10,813
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamakay View Post
Also from the Pink Book on polio regarding the remainder of the polio cases:

Approximately 4%–8% of polio infections consist of a minor, nonspecific illness without clinical or laboratory evidence of central nervous system invasion. This clinical presentation is known as abortive poliomyelitis, and is
characterized by complete recovery in less than a week.

Three syndromes observed with this form of poliovirus infection are upper respiratory tract infection (sore throat and fever), gastrointestinal disturbances (nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, constipation or, rarely, diarrhea), and influenza-like illness. These syndromes are indistinguishable
from other viral illnesses.


Fewer than 1% of all polio infections result in flaccid paralysis.
LongIsland is offline  
Old 11-26-2006, 04:27 AM
 
LongIsland's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: New York
Posts: 10,813
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by boston View Post
I know people who've had varicella as adults who've been very sick from it. Hospitalized for a couple weeks in one case. That's certainly harder to deal with!
Complications from varicella happen for a reason. While the adult may appear to be "healthy," they are usually not and most have diagnosed immune system disorders.

Based on CDC varicella surveillance, it is well known that something is usually going on with the immune system of those suffering complications from varicella -- and it's usually cancer, diabetes, asthma, they're on dangerous cortisterioids like Prednisone, for something, etc. Sometimes even the IV drugs used to treat varicella complicate it even further.

While the CDC likes to tout that even "healthy" people suffer complications and death - individuals who suffer complications are not as "healthy" as they think and make them susceptible to complications and secondary infections.

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm4818a3.htm
LongIsland is offline  
 
User Tag List

Thread Tools


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off