My 10 year Old Daughter Still wets the bed- ......Anyone? - Mothering Forums
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#1 of 7 Old 02-04-2011, 08:14 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Although I know that bed wetting is somewhat normal, I am truly starting to worry that this is never going to end!! We try to encourage her, tell her not to worry, there were bed wetters on both sides of our family. It won't go on forever( RIGHT???) Her brother can be brutal to her at times about it. Even with pull ups, often the rest of our laundry gets set on the back burner for the sheer mountainous piles of pee bedding that always seem to accumulate- Daily ( and in the winter- that's about 2 loads a night- sheets, blanket, comforter). Trying to hang in there with out becoming exasperated ( um, I think I'm exasperated....). We limit fluids at night. She' goes to the bathroom before bed and often we get her up in the middle of the night. Yesterday, I went in to her room to kiss her good morning at 6:20 a.m. before I left for work. I told her she was dry and encouraged her to get up. Her dad woke her at 7, and she was wet ( which of course means a 20 min bath, and 10 mins of trying to get her out of the tub.) Any one else have older kids that still wet the bed? Any magic out there? She's a "cool" kid with a "secret" and it's really starting to wear on her self esteem. 

 

Oh, my........

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#2 of 7 Old 02-04-2011, 08:35 PM
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Well, just happened to see your post and was hoping I might gleen some info for my dd. She is 5 and wants to be dry at night and it has been a struggle.

I am just about to potty train my ds and got some info that has been helpful to dd too. So this is what we do. She falls asleep, I wake her one hour after she falls asleep, any later and she is sometimes wet. Take her to the bathroom, she usually goes, then right back to bed and asleep. Honestly, she does not even fully awake during all this. Then I wake her one hour before she wakes up, take her to the bathroom, she goes then I put her back to bed. Most of the time it keeps her dry. Sometimes it does not, like last night, she ate some watermelon before bed, and oops, wet all night. I think she peed like three or four times! So we do let her have a water bottle for sips of water but at the same time do not let her down a bunch of fluid before bed. I wish I would have thought of what that watermelon was going to do! duh!

Not sure yet how to transition to her going on her own. I keep waiting for about two week of full dryness but something keeps happening every once in a while that makes her wet. I dunno, wait and see I suppose!

 

good luck!

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#3 of 7 Old 02-04-2011, 08:39 PM
 
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I wet the bed til I was 11 or 12.  I didn't wet the bed every night by that point, but I was still wearing pull ups.  I was put on a medication to help with it.  I don't remember what, but I assume it must have been the hormone your body is supposed to produce to tell your bladder to hold it in through the night or to wake you up.  Have you tried talking to her doctor about it and options besides pull ups and alarms?  My mom used to wake me up every night but it wasn't enough.

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#4 of 7 Old 02-05-2011, 01:48 PM
 
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I wet the bed until I was 11 or so. What finally seemed to help me was practicing holding it longer during the day. It was if I had to train my bladder to hold it until I really had to go. (or, that might have just been when I grew out of it)

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#5 of 7 Old 02-05-2011, 03:40 PM
 
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My oldest is turning 10 in April and she sounds just like your daughter!  I don't have any advice since our routine is pretty similar to yours but I thought I'd let you know that you're not alone :)  I brought it up with her pediatrician and she recommended hypnosis (implying that it's a psychological issue) and although I do get that it's 'all in the head' with some kids I don't think it is in our case so we're making an appt with a specialist.  Does your daughter urinate frequently throughout the day?  Does she need to GO immediately (without much warning)?  These are a couple of the things that make me believe that we are dealing with a medical issue.  I'll update once we have more info on what's going on, or if I hear about any new tricks...   


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#6 of 7 Old 02-05-2011, 03:44 PM
 
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What is her doctor saying about it?


DS (6.06), DD (10.08), DD (05.11).

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#7 of 7 Old 02-05-2011, 04:48 PM
 
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My kids are younger- 6 1/2, 4, and 4, but DH was a long-term bedwetter, and none of my kids are dry at night, so I think we're headed in your direction. Have you ever tried one of those alarm conditioning systems? We had a conversation with DD1's pediatrician, recently, and we've decided this summer to give one of those a try. We're waiting until the summer, because she's in school, and the summer is a better time if her sleep is going to be interrupted for awhile. There are also medication options, and hypnosis, and I'm sure there must be other possibilities I haven't explored yet. I would strongly recommend finding a health care professional who's supportive and has some expertise in nocturnal eneuresis. It's fairly common for bedwetting to persist-- in fact, the rate in healthy, neurotypical adults is about .5%. But there are so many things that can help, that it's worth reaching out if you haven't already.

Apologies of course if you've already been down that route-- I don't mean to condescend. redface.gif

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