8 year old daughter with BO, hot flashes and mood swings - Page 2 - Mothering Forums

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#31 of 44 Old 12-26-2012, 12:07 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Tigerchild View Post

I agree, the fear-mongering is really horrible around this subject.

 

My daughter started developing breast buds at 8, and got her period at 10.5 (about six months before I did).  She is healthy, happy.  She's eaten an excellent, whole foods/mostly organic diet her whole life.

 

Puberty is not "early" at 9 or 10.  It's just not.  My daughter was one of the first in her class to develop, but not the only one, and now that they're all 10 or 11 she doesn't look that much different (other than she is very tall, she's 5'5"!)  She's not overweight (never has been, if anything she falls on the underweight side of things).  She still plays with dolls, hangs out with friends, loves to write and imagine and all the fun kid things (climbing trees, building forts, ect).  One can do that, and still have a period once in awhile, I don't think my daughter is unusual in that at all.

 

I worry for girls who have to be in an environment that says "developing boobs is bad" or "omg you're 'growing up' too quickly".  I know I have had to go mama bear postal on a few people in my life to prevent them from putting their ignorant and shaming comments on my kid.  Her body started changing.  So what?  She just learned how to care for her changing body.  It didn't need to put limits on her, or expectations, nor did it fundamentally change who she is on the inside.  Some of her peers that are undeveloped are into boys and the like, she is not.  I'm glad for a face to face community that isn't shaming towards her (or any of the other girls) regardless of the state of their physical development.
 

This is not fear-mongering, this is stating a concerning issue of our times. Nor is this shaming, if you take it as that way, then that is your sensitivities around this issue. I am glad your DD is handling puberty so well. But I am also glad that my DD didn't have to experience it at such a young age.


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#32 of 44 Old 12-26-2012, 12:31 PM
 
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Sorry, can't agree with you. It is not good that a child of 8 or 9 is starting her period, who now has to cope with her adult body and the emotions that go along with it. Our environment is awash in endocrine disruptive toxins which how ever you slice it, is not good for the human organism.

 

When it's stated as "puberty" starting at 8 or 9, that does not mean period, Mirzam.  Menarche tends to start a couple of years after the beginning of puberty.  If a girl gets her period at 8 or 9, then presumably she started puberty at 6, 7, or earlier, which *would* actually meet the definition of "early puberty."

 

Developing breast buds or some body hair (often the first signs of puberty) at 8 or 9 is not abnormal.

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#33 of 44 Old 12-26-2012, 01:24 PM
 
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When it's stated as "puberty" starting at 8 or 9, that does not mean period, Mirzam.  Menarche tends to start a couple of years after the beginning of puberty.  If a girl gets her period at 8 or 9, then presumably she started puberty at 6, 7, or earlier, which *would* actually meet the definition of "early puberty."

 

Developing breast buds or some body hair (often the first signs of puberty) at 8 or 9 is not abnormal.

Developing breast buds, body odor, underarm and public hair are all physical signs of puberty, prior to menarche, which have corresponding emotional effects on a child. These physical changes while common at 8 or 9 years old, do not make them a good thing, just not unusual these days. It has been shown that it takes less time for early maturers to go from the development of breast buds, public hair to menarche, than girls who mature later. This can result in psychological difficulties: having to cope with significant body and lifestyle changes at an earlier age than their friends, before they are emotionally ready for biological maturity. 

 

Detrimental Psychological Outcomes Associated with Early Pubertal Timing in Adolescent Girls.

 

 

 

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[i]t is possible that early development may interact with normative hormonal changes in such a way as to be particularly detrimental for early maturers (a psychobiological model). Increases in hormones, particularly estradiol, during puberty may heighten a girl’s sensitivity to environmental conditions, resulting in disproportionate increases in negative affect following discouraging events, such as exchanges with peers or parents (Brooks-Gunn & Warren, 1989). Because early maturers must endure the consequences of hormonal changes at a time when the majority of their later-developing peers are more stable, this may amplify feelings of being isolated or misunderstood by others. Correspondingly, hormonally-triggered erratic behavior may be perceived by others in such a way as to result in conflict, social problems, or the cessation of longstanding childhood friendships.

 

 

I know how it feels to be an early developer - I started developing pubic hair at 9/10 years old. I was at boarding school, and I found it to be mortifying to be the only one. Of course nowadays, it appears that this is no longer early, but it was a terrible experience for me as a child. I started my period a few months before I turned 13. 


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#34 of 44 Old 12-26-2012, 03:24 PM
 
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My dd started getting body odor and acne around 7 or 8 years old with noticeable underarm/pubic hair, some breast development and moodiness starting around 9 or 10 years old. She did not have hot flashes at any point though. I would say that is something to see a doctor about to rule out other conditions.

 

Dd's first period happened right at her 12th birthday- which was the same age that I got mine. I don't think it is particularly early- age 10 to age 13 is pretty average for a first period and has been since I was a kid.

From what I have discussed with other mothers most girls seem to be getting their periods around the same age that their mothers did so it isn't like there has been a big shift in the last 30 or 40 years. There is evidence of a shift from what was average first menarche of 100 years ago (13 or 14 years) but a lot has changed since then, including children being taller and having better access to health care and a variety of food. I think it is a curious point that there has been a shift but not necessarily a health concern. If your dc enters puberty earlier than a child 100 yeas ago it doesn't necessarily mean there is anything wrong with their body if most kids these days are entering puberty earlier as well.

 

Dd was upset that first period but not after that. It hasn't dramatically altered her lifestyle, personality or stolen her childhood away. She has now had a period every month for 10 months and isn't having any emotional difficulties over her body. She weighs 81 lbs and is a little over 5'3" tall. She wears a size 32A bra. She is not unhealthy, in a stressful environment and gets plenty to eat.


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#35 of 44 Old 12-28-2012, 05:47 AM
 
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I have heard that it's only after a girl gets underarm hair that she can get her period. Any time after she starts growing underarm hair. And I don't believe it's unhealthy. I mean, you may not see the other girls around her going through it, but I'm sure they are. It isn't something you want to announce to the world. I also don't see a problem. I honestly think that Mother Nature would only start their puberty when they were ready. They may not feel ready, but Mother Nature knows they are. You may not see them as ready, but they might. There may be studies showing there being a quicker time between them, but trust me, girls feel just as insecure about going through puberty later than all their friends, as to early. And as I said before, I'm sure if she's in a close knit of friends, and they can talk about it, they'll find they are all going through similar things (maybe not the flushes (I know I went through them, and still do (and I've only had my period for 3 years now)) but not many of my friends did, and so she just has to watch herself when she feels that way (also make sure her vitamins are up, like I mean I don't want to scare you, but when I go through a hot flush, I have to watch my iron levels, otherwise I faint, but as long as she's active and happy she'll be fine)) and that way they feel less insecure.
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#36 of 44 Old 12-28-2012, 11:12 PM
 
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It's highly individual.  DD has had her period for 6 months now, and still doesn't have underarm hair (we go swimming once a week, so it'd be noticeable).

 

Come to think about it, I think it took me about a year to develop underarm hair after I started my period, and it's always been sparse.

 

I'm thinking maybe the body hair thing might be more dependent on how hairy you tend to be (I'm not, I can literally go months without shaving and unless you're feeling my leg it wouldn't be noticeable, I have fine/light body hair).

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#37 of 44 Old 01-14-2013, 07:47 PM
 
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I hate to say this but we have been going through this since our daughter was 7! She is 10 now. No period but cycling with emotions. Last week we could say nothing to her right. Keep in mind we have a 3 year old. I am literally ready to just quit and leave. I am so stressed now myself that I am not helping but rather probably hurting the situation. I can only tell you we are right there with you...
 


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#38 of 44 Old 01-14-2013, 07:56 PM
 
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@ TigerChild:

 

I don't know why but your views seem to coincide with mine. I am so frustrated with the amount of shaming of our society projects onto women of any age. We have to somehow fit into a mold and I am so sorry but I carry way too much guilt of not fitting that mold. I feel as though I am supposed to be the kind, gentle, cooking, cleaning, working, all doing mother of the world because that is what is so often pushed onto me. I am not that person--->at least not all the time. I lose my temper, I mess things up, I say swear words, I dislike people/views/comments, I don't want to cook sometimes, etc. I am tired of feeling as though I should be everything to everyone all the time. You sound as though  you are doing good things for your daughter and she is adjusting just fine to womanhood. Good for the both of you! thumb.gif
 


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#39 of 44 Old 01-14-2013, 08:05 PM
 
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 I am experiencing the same type of episodes with my 10 year old daughter. Recently she will get an onset of hot flashes and sharp pains in her stomach followed by a feeling of nausea and slight dizziness. These episodes last about 15-20 mins and then go away. She is very frightned when this occurs so I took her to a paediatrician and completed a bunch of blood work. All the results came back normal... So it is still unknown why this is happening! Did you ever find a reason or cause to why this is happening to your daughter?


We went through the belly pains last year. Our daughter was 9 then. They sent us to a gastroenterologist and tried to cite all these reasons it could be but that they did not know for sure. I think it is simply stuff our girls are going through physically. Perhaps, we even had this but didn't pay any attention to it? Our daughter is recently starting to say she is hot and while I joke and say "it's just you", it really may be just her. Our pediatrician said it was nerves but that just didn't fit our daughter. Sure, she has nerves and she has a mom who has more anxieties than most but she knows my background (traumatic birth family and adoption) but those things don't affect her. Our home is pretty tense these days between a three year old and a pre-teen going through these physical/emotional changes so all I can offer is understanding and hugs to you ladies...


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#40 of 44 Old 01-16-2013, 03:43 PM
 
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DP and I were both 11 when we got our periods, the end of summer before 6th grade. DD1 got hers at 11.5, again, right before 6th grade. DD2 is 12 and in 6th grade and will probably start before she hits 12.5. I got my first bra in 4th grade, training, but none of my other friends had them yet and were totally jealous. I remember one of my best friends in 6th grade mortifying me in front of her father by declaring how life was so unfair and I got mine first (she was a total brat looking back on it, but in the moment sometimes you don't realize how insane your friends can act at when you're his age, lol). Honestly, that's the only time I was embarrassed by "developing early". Sure, there were other period related offenses or otherwise humiliating teenage moments, but developing a little bit ahead of the curve isn't generally "a bad thing", especially not now. I've heard of a few having menses at 9, but most are 11-13, and I know of a couple 14 year olds who still haven't.

FWIW, we don't let either of our girls slut/body/whatever shame anyone else. I've even called out her friends for calling other girls at school bad names. It's a good practice.

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#41 of 44 Old 01-30-2013, 07:15 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Tigerchild View Post

I agree, the fear-mongering is really horrible around this subject.

 

My daughter started developing breast buds at 8, and got her period at 10.5 (about six months before I did).  She is healthy, happy.  She's eaten an excellent, whole foods/mostly organic diet her whole life.

 

Puberty is not "early" at 9 or 10.  It's just not.  My daughter was one of the first in her class to develop, but not the only one, and now that they're all 10 or 11 she doesn't look that much different (other than she is very tall, she's 5'5"!)  She's not overweight (never has been, if anything she falls on the underweight side of things).  She still plays with dolls, hangs out with friends, loves to write and imagine and all the fun kid things (climbing trees, building forts, ect).  One can do that, and still have a period once in awhile, I don't think my daughter is unusual in that at all.

 

I worry for girls who have to be in an environment that says "developing boobs is bad" or "omg you're 'growing up' too quickly".  I know I have had to go mama bear postal on a few people in my life to prevent them from putting their ignorant and shaming comments on my kid.  Her body started changing.  So what?  She just learned how to care for her changing body.  It didn't need to put limits on her, or expectations, nor did it fundamentally change who she is on the inside.  Some of her peers that are undeveloped are into boys and the like, she is not.  I'm glad for a face to face community that isn't shaming towards her (or any of the other girls) regardless of the state of their physical development.
 

    Thank you so much for your post! My dd is about the same as yours, and I have struggled with holding a balanced view of it all.  I needed to hear this. Thanks!! 


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#42 of 44 Old 02-01-2013, 07:27 AM
 
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I have experience with a young girl, 7, developing occasional body odor that was......wait for it......related to food intolerances (this is mothering, afterall ;)).  In her case, it was too much dairy ("clean" dairy at that).  Once that was more or less eliminated, the problem went away.  She shows no other signs of entering puberty.


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#43 of 44 Old 02-06-2013, 12:09 PM
 
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It's called puberty dear, it just means she will shaft her periods
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#44 of 44 Old Today, 09:48 AM
 
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This what had happened to my daughter as well, she is 9 years old, many time so hot flashes and we used to put some wet cloths, etc, and also burpings. We have seen pediatric and GI specialists but nothing worked out and all tests were normal. When I visited India I took my daughter to pediatric where he identified saying that could be Vitamin D deficieny and that cause all these symptoms and he ordered Vitamin D test that cam out 9 which is very very low. She is back to normal after boosting her Vitamin D. You may better to check Vitamin D.
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