Hair removal for pre-teens? - Mothering Forums
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#1 of 11 Old 08-24-2012, 10:37 PM - Thread Starter
 
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My daughter is almost 10 and she has very hairy legs.  She is half Greek so it is very dark and noticeable. I have tried to tell her that it's not a big deal but she is starting to feel really self-conscious about it.  She is a gymnast so her legs are visible a lot year round.  I don't know whether 10 is too young to start shaving.  Or whether she can even do it without hacking up her legs.  I think waxing would likely be too painful - although that would possibly last longer (have to do it less frequently).  She keeps seeing this commercial for the No No hair removal system and wants me to get it for her but I've read a ton of reviews that it doesn't actually work.  So...opinions?  Is just turning 10 to young to worry about hair removal?  If not, how to go about safely removing the hair?  I certainly don't want her to be feeling embarrassed about her body.


Shawna, married to Michael, mommy to Elijah 1/18/01, Olivia 11/9/02, and Eliana 1/22/06
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#2 of 11 Old 08-25-2012, 07:21 AM
 
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I think it really depends on the tween. In her case, it sounds like she is old enough. Is the hair remover system she wants cheap or expensive? I've bought a couple of things like that which were inexpensive because my dd's thought they would be wonderful just so my kid could see for themselves that they didn't work well. Both my dd's shave using decent disposable razors. The big thing seems to be making sure they get replaced in a timely fashion so the kids aren't shaving with dull blades.

My dd's stating shaving a little later, but not much. But they have lighter hair and less of it.

One of my dd's has special needs and started shaving at 12 and has never cut herself. I suspect your dd will do fine with a little instruction.

but everything has pros and cons  shrug.gif

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#3 of 11 Old 08-25-2012, 10:54 AM
 
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I wouldn't buy the No No system. If it's still around when she can pay for it herself? Then she can get it.

 

There are lots of products from razonrs to depilatories that she can try. I don't think 10 is too young to shave, if she wants to take care of her hair issues.

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#4 of 11 Old 08-25-2012, 04:07 PM
 
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I let my 11yr old wax. She only went twice before she asked to use a razor.

I don't think there is a set age. Just a combination of genetic hair growth and personal preference.

Not sure how I feel about permanent hair removal at a young age, but even for myself, I researched the nono devices and haven't heard much positive about them

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#5 of 11 Old 08-25-2012, 06:24 PM
 
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My 10-year-old is unconcerned about leg hair at this point, but I'd let her shave if she were uncomfortable. I've been thinking about how she should remove the hair when the time comes, and I wonder if an electric razor would cause the least damage, but as I recall they don't give a close shave. Hmm still I might have my daughter try that first. Not sure. I use a regular razor but I sure hacked up my legs when I was learning how.
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#6 of 11 Old 08-25-2012, 06:27 PM
 
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I had an electric razor at ten and started using a razor shortly after. My mom explained how to use it and to expect some cuts because it is hard to shave at times, especially with low quality razors. I got my dd a higher quality one when she decided she wanted to shave her underarms
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#7 of 11 Old 08-25-2012, 08:59 PM
 
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my grandma used to wax me at that age when i would visit her in the summers, and it was great. plus on the long term it really cut down my hair a lot. on the legs it is really pretty easy, i would let my 10 year old get it done, no worries as long as i was in the room and i had had the waxer do me first to see is she was good.

 

i personally hate shaving and think that it would take a lot of a pre teen or teenagers time up in what is probably already a busy day. and i have a teenage niece and i hear her complain a lot about if she has stubble or things like that. 


partners.gif 2twins.gif  So what if I don't fit cleanly into a defined parenting style, my kids don't fit into a personality archetype either!

 
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#8 of 11 Old 08-26-2012, 06:10 PM
 
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I say when they are old enough to be uncomfortable with body hair, then they are old enough to remove it if they want to. I remember in middle school  a girl who had very dark, long leg hair who wanted nothing more then to shave. She wasn't allowed to until age 13 or 14 (I can't remember now), it affected her to the point where she never showed her legs, preferring to wear jeans in 100 degree weather instead. DD1 is very comfortable with her body. She still wanders around the house unclothed not caring who sees her, so when she asked to start shaving at age 9 because she was uncomfortable, I let her. She did for a few months and then got tired of cutting herself and hasn't since. For now anyway!


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#9 of 11 Old 08-27-2012, 09:08 PM
 
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Re: hacking up legs.... Personally I've found doorknobs to be more dangerous than shaving razors, in terms of both frequency and severity of injury. But no one keeps their kids from using doorknobs.

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#10 of 11 Old 08-28-2012, 11:52 AM
 
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Yeah? Wow. I've never hurt myself with a doorknob. I can't think of a time my kids have either. What injury comes from a doorknob?

(No snark here- just wondering if I'm overlooking some injury or dont' remember something.)
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#11 of 11 Old 08-28-2012, 12:27 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mamazee View Post

Yeah? Wow. I've never hurt myself with a doorknob. I can't think of a time my kids have either. What injury comes from a doorknob?
(No snark here- just wondering if I'm overlooking some injury or dont' remember something.)

Depending on the speed bruised ribs and nasty bumps that bleed from the actual knob ime. From doors blood blisters, bruises, and fingers cut off (or nearly in my mother's case. I found that high quality razors prevent small cuts but the cuts are typically small even with crappy ones.
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