Will my DD grow up to be flat-chested like me? - Mothering Forums
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#1 of 24 Old 03-26-2014, 02:47 AM - Thread Starter
 
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I'm not sure how to start this thread. Basically, I never really developed any breast tissue. I ended up with large areolas/nipples at age 12 and that's it. Nothing more ever developed after that. I hit the other puberty milestones - got my period at age 13 - but never got breasts. I finally got implants in my 20s.

 

This will probably sound shallow to some people, but I am terrified, I mean really terrified, that my daughter will end up with the same curse (yep, curse) of having no breasts. Let me be clear here. I'm not talking about AA or AAA cup. I'm talking about having close to no breast tissue at all - the same as a boy.

 

She's now 9.5 years old. She has very similar morphology to mine, tall, slim, very narrow rib cage, and still completely flat chested - no little buds, no nipple growth, nothing. She's like my 5-year old son. She has started growing pubic hair, so puberty is setting in. She has expressed some worry that her chest should be starting to grow, like the other girls her age, even if just a little tiny bit. She even says that she has noticed that her chest seems much narrower than the other girls, and asks if am I sure that anything will grow there. I don't know what to say to her. I haven't told her about the curse of my sisters and me because I don't want to set her up for it ahead of time (you never know what that can do). I've told her that if nothing changes by the time she is 13 years old, we'll go see a doctor.

 

I'm not even sure why I'm writing this except to ask if any other moms are in the same boat or have had a similar experience and what was the outcome with your daughter. Did your daughter turn out flat-chested, too? How can I approach this with her? Should I tell her that I never developed real breasts (just to be clear, I have not told my daughter about the implants. As far as I know, she thinks they're real)? Is there anything that can be done?? Diet? Hormones? Anything? 


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#2 of 24 Old 03-26-2014, 05:59 PM
 
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Have you spoken to a gynecologist about this? If you have one you see it may be a good idea in case there is a treatment that came up since you were a child. There may be hormone deficiencies that an endocrinologist can help find if buds don't come in the next year.
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#3 of 24 Old 03-26-2014, 06:49 PM
 
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I have the opposite issue, but yes, my daughter's development and journey through puberty is much like mine was.


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#4 of 24 Old 03-26-2014, 06:54 PM
 
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My daughter is 10.5 and hasn't started to develop at all yet, so I can't answer your question directly, but I am one of three sisters. The three if us have completely different shape and sized breasts. I most closely resemble my mother's in size (I am EE, and she was probably a DD at my age and weight) but the shape is not really the same. My next sister is smaller at a B cup, and the other is a C. So while there is a chance your daughter will have the same experience as you there is a los a good chance that she will not.
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#5 of 24 Old 03-26-2014, 08:38 PM
 
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My sister and were both flat, and my mom was not. I suspect we took after our father's side. There weren't any girls around to compare on that side since they were all in Europe. 

 

It sounds so similar to your case. Very narrow rib cage, no breast tissue, sister with same issue, but no other family members. 

 

I always wanted implants, but put it off until after I was done having children (36), and I chose small ones (225 CCs) so that I would still look like "myself". My sister never wanted implants, that I know of.

 

The thought did cross my mind that my daughter may have this issue as well. Her body type is a little different than mine though. Most of my (mom's) relatives have nice curvy yet petite figures with B-C cups, and my husband's family is a mixed bag of A-D+. cups. I suspect she will have breasts when she grows up, since she is built so differently than I am. 

 

That is a good idea, to ask the doctor, especially if she is showing other signs of puberty. You could call or ask in private, and tell them that you and your sisters never developed breast tissue and you are wondering what causes this and ask if your daughter might have the same condition. Let us know what you find out!

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#6 of 24 Old 03-27-2014, 05:41 PM
 
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I would recommend you do something to deal with your own insecurities and not pass them on to your dd. People come in different shapes and sizes; some women are flat-chested and you know what? There is nothing wrong with that!
I had the same problem, weighed 100 lbs until I had my first child. But my almost non-existent breasts fed two children for 8 years. They did what they were meant to do, and I couldn't be more proud of them.
If you teach your dd to be proud of whatever shape or size her breasts and her body is, chances are that being flat-chested will be a non-issue.

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#7 of 24 Old 03-27-2014, 11:11 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Thank you for all your replies. I have been doing a bit of research and I will be trying to find an endocrinologist that I can discuss this with.

 

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I would recommend you do something to deal with your own insecurities and not pass them on to your dd. People come in different shapes and sizes; some women are flat-chested and you know what? There is nothing wrong with that!
I had the same problem, weighed 100 lbs until I had my first child. But my almost non-existent breasts fed two children for 8 years. They did what they were meant to do, and I couldn't be more proud of them.
If you teach your dd to be proud of whatever shape or size her breasts and her body is, chances are that being flat-chested will be a non-issue.

 

I am happy to teach my DD to be proud of her body but I am certainly not going to ignore her worries. I understand the "everyone is different and every body should be accepted" point of view but I also understand (because I've been there) a girl who would like to be able to wear an evening gown, a sexy dress, a strapless shirt or dress, a bikini bathing suit (heck any bathing suit with cups). Telling my daughter that she needs to learn to accept her body and be proud of it when she is feeling like she is missing a part and missing out on wearing a huge number of things that girls and women enjoy wearing is not going to resolve her feelings or satisfy her desire to have breasts.  I remember my mother telling me similar things such as, "Be glad! You won't be so large-breasted once you have kids!" and "I don't see anything wrong with your size". These answers were her way of sweeping my concerns under the rug. They were not addressing my real feelings and concerns about the issue. No, I am not going to sweep this one under the rug. 


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#8 of 24 Old 03-28-2014, 10:29 AM
 
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Originally Posted by RomanGoddess View Post

 

I am happy to teach my DD to be proud of her body but I am certainly not going to ignore her worries.

 

I think it's a difficult line you have to walk here. You have to respond to her worries but without projecting upon her your own intense fears. I think it's best to remain cheerful, casual and open ... which you might have to mentally rehearse, and do almost as if you're an actor playing a part. Be reassuring without being dishonest. Say something like....

 

"Well, not everybody gets breasts at 9 or 10. I certainly didn't. Some girls are a fair bit older, and some barely get any breasts at all, so it's hard to predict when or how much your breasts will grow. It's normal to worry about how your body is changing as you go through puberty, but it's important to remember that everyone is different and what's most important is being strong and healthy -- which you certainly are. You're still pretty young. I think that if you're still worried this time next spring, we could make an appointment to talk with our doctor. How does that sound?"

 

I also think that since you can't predict what direction her questions will run, you should be prepared to disclose your own situation, and should have a rehearsed an explanation that just as honest, casual and cheerful as if you were talking to her about how people make career choices. "No, mine didn't really grow at all. When I got older I decided to have surgery to make boobs. I'm happy I decided to do that, but who knows, your situation could be totally different. It probably will be." 

 

Good luck! 

 

Miranda

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#9 of 24 Old 03-28-2014, 02:03 PM
 
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I think it's a difficult line you have to walk here. You have to respond to her worries but without projecting upon her your own intense fears. I think it's best to remain cheerful, casual and open ... which you might have to mentally rehearse, and do almost as if you're an actor playing a part. Be reassuring without being dishonest. Say something like....

 

"Well, not everybody gets breasts at 9 or 10. I certainly didn't. Some girls are a fair bit older, and some barely get any breasts at all, so it's hard to predict when or how much your breasts will grow. It's normal to worry about how your body is changing as you go through puberty, but it's important to remember that everyone is different and what's most important is being strong and healthy -- which you certainly are. You're still pretty young. I think that if you're still worried this time next spring, we could make an appointment to talk with our doctor. How does that sound?"

 

I also think that since you can't predict what direction her questions will run, you should be prepared to disclose your own situation, and should have a rehearsed an explanation that just as honest, casual and cheerful as if you were talking to her about how people make career choices. "No, mine didn't really grow at all. When I got older I decided to have surgery to make boobs. I'm happy I decided to do that, but who knows, your situation could be totally different. It probably will be." 

 

Good luck! 

 

Miranda

I would add to the second part about the implants if they come up though. You might want to say that many people who don't develop breast tissue (whether due to a hormone imbalance, or due to heredity) DO NOT choose to get implants and still go on to live a happy life. (Ok, so we are still ticked off that we don't look like a "woman" topless and people who actually do fill an AAA training bra tell us to lighten up because they are flat too...I swear I just wanted to flash people sometimes so they would understand just how flat I was). 

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#10 of 24 Old 03-29-2014, 10:15 AM
 
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I think the way you handled it is perfect. If she expresses worry show her that you take her concerns seriously. I would probably tell her that we could go to the dr about it when she's 13 if she wants to, leaving it open. I know that you opted to change your shape because you were unhappy with it, but some women out there in your same boat (not talking about small breasts, but no breasts) might actually be fine and happy with that and not view it as a curse, but as a blessing. Don't be terrified for her. Let her come to her own conclusions about it if it comes to that and neither dismiss her worries nor project your worries on her. When she's 13, if she's still completely undeveloped she might say, "I'm worried I'll never get breasts," or she might say, "I never want to have any breasts; I want to stay the way I am!" Ask and listen and respond accordingly.

 

I agree that it's worth investigating with a doctor in a few years if she wants to. There might be something that can be done to stimulate normal growth if they do diagnose a deficiency. IME, 9.5 is really pretty young for any breast development, though. I have a 13 yr old and a 10 yr old. Very few of the girls in my 10 yr old's 4th grade class have any breast development and several of the girls in my 7th grader's class don't have any, either. Most of them are starting to, but there are quite a few who pretty much still look like boys. If your daughter has your body type could be she will have your breast type, too, but she might have inherited that from her dad's side. I'm about a C, but my sis is about an A. 

 

My dd1 had a lot of anxiety about puberty in 3rd grade (dd2 not so much). She was flat as a boy, but she wasn't worried about breast size in particular, just puberty and tween angst. We read a lot of books ("The Care and Keeping of You" from American Girl is great) and went out and got some little unpadded training bras because it made her feel better. She certainly didn't need them at all and really didn't even begin to start to develop until several years later. 

 

I know a couple of kids with different growth issues. I know a boy who is so cute, but he's a 4th grader who looks about like a 1st grader. He has always been tiny. I know his parents have talked to endocrinologists and initially chose to watch and wait, but left the option of hormone therapy on the table for later. I know a couple of girls who are really tall, too. Both of their dads are former basketball players and one of the girls, a 6th grader, is over 6 feet at this point and still growing (her dad is over 7 feet), but she is really happy to be tall and loved being the tallest kid (of all the girls and the boys, too) in her elementary school. Projecting my feelings, I would be worried about how tall she would ultimately become because it can be rough for a woman to be much over 6 feet, but you've gotta go with how she feels about being tall which is just great! 

 

I think it's fine to bring up surgery. I'm sure she's seen tattoos and body piercings, certainly earrings, and knows that people modify their bodies. It's fine to tell her that some people change the shape of their breasts and noses, too. Most women don't, but when someone is really unhappy with the way they look they might opt to change it. There are different ways to change breast shapes, too. Some women just choose to wear a padded bra for a little something more. Some choose surgery for a more permanent change. I don't think you have to tell her that you opted to change your shape via surgery right now. Let her think on the idea for awhile. If she brings it up again you can tell her about your choice then. Don't leave out that some women who feel too big have breast reduction surgery, too. I went to college with a girl who had that because she was in a lot of pain and was uneven. Your call on bringing up medical mastectomy or gender identity issues. My kids are very sensitive and prone to worry about disease so I probably wouldn't bring up breast cancer just yet, but your kid might be interested in medical stuff. I have told them about gender identity issues.

 

I do think you should let her make up her own mind about how she feels about her breasts. One of my best friends in high school inherited her mom's long roman nose, but her mom had had a nose job many years earlier so she got one for her daughter, too, while she was still in high school. I thought my friend's original nose was a great nose (similar to this one, but they weren't Jewish), but her mom didn't. I think my friend might have come to like her original nose as an adult (I never actually heard her say anything negative about it), but I guess it reminded her mom of her own feelings about her own nose, and she wanted her daughter to have a nose job, too. My friend seemed happy with the new nose, too, so I guess it worked out, but as a parent I think it would be better to let the child make up her own mind when she's an adult.

 

So right now, I think you're doing all the same things I would do. Definitely take it up with a doctor later on if that's what your daughter wants to do. You could talk to a doctor yourself just to research what the options might be for treatment if needed so you could relay that info to your daughter if she expresses interest in going to a doctor a few years down the road. I wouldn't advocate implants as a teenager, but if hormone therapy might help it could be worth investigating the risks and benefits. Might be risky (I don't know anything about it) and not something you want to mess with and you might feel that implants are a safer bet down the road. Maybe some natural supplements like soy could help boost her hormone levels enough to induce growth. I really have no idea, not having researched it at all, but I think your job as a mom is to research safe options and let her make her own mind up. 

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#11 of 24 Old 03-29-2014, 11:34 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I think it's a difficult line you have to walk here. You have to respond to her worries but without projecting upon her your own intense fears. I think it's best to remain cheerful, casual and open ... which you might have to mentally rehearse, and do almost as if you're an actor playing a part. Be reassuring without being dishonest. Say something like....

 

"Well, not everybody gets breasts at 9 or 10. I certainly didn't. Some girls are a fair bit older, and some barely get any breasts at all, so it's hard to predict when or how much your breasts will grow. It's normal to worry about how your body is changing as you go through puberty, but it's important to remember that everyone is different and what's most important is being strong and healthy -- which you certainly are. You're still pretty young. I think that if you're still worried this time next spring, we could make an appointment to talk with our doctor. How does that sound?"

 

I also think that since you can't predict what direction her questions will run, you should be prepared to disclose your own situation, and should have a rehearsed an explanation that just as honest, casual and cheerful as if you were talking to her about how people make career choices. "No, mine didn't really grow at all. When I got older I decided to have surgery to make boobs. I'm happy I decided to do that, but who knows, your situation could be totally different. It probably will be." 

 

Good luck! 

 

Miranda

 

Yes, I agree, it is a difficult line to walk. I am taking great care not to project my worries to her at this point. In our discussions, I have told her that everyone is different, some women are flat, some are big. I don't want to tell her that I am flat yet because I don't know how that will psychologically set her up for expecting to be flat as well, and you never know how mind affects body in the end.

 

What I don't want to do is replicate my own mother's approach, which was to basically (a) avoid the topic altogether, and (b) if I brought it up, tell me how great it is to be flat and how thankful I will be when I am older that I don't have huge breasts and how there is nothing wrong or abnormal about my breasts. When a friend brings up an issue that she is concerned about, telling your friend that you don't see anything wrong and that she must "look on the bright side" is not the right approach.


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#12 of 24 Old 03-29-2014, 11:42 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I agree that it's worth investigating with a doctor in a few years if she wants to. There might be something that can be done to stimulate normal growth if they do diagnose a deficiency. IME, 9.5 is really pretty young for any breast development, though. I have a 13 yr old and a 10 yr old. Very few of the girls in my 10 yr old's 4th grade class have any breast development and several of the girls in my 7th grader's class don't have any, either. Most of them are starting to, but there are quite a few who pretty much still look like boys. If your daughter has your body type could be she will have your breast type, too, but she might have inherited that from her dad's side. I'm about a C, but my sis is about an A. 

 

 

I would like to meet with a doctor NOW just to discuss the issues. I don't want my daughter there. I would just like to discuss, in full detail, my own history with the doctor (early pubic hair, development of large areola/nipple at age 12 but no breast buds and no development of breast tissue, menarche at age 13, severe back acne until age 30 when I finally went on acutane, 21-24 day menstrual cycle). There are a few red flags there that maybe will give an endocrinologist an idea as to what might have happened to me and what might be happening to my daughter.

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#13 of 24 Old 03-29-2014, 11:56 PM
 
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I had small breasts- A cup- before kids, and I'm tall with curvy hips so I was very insecure about my perceived "inadequacy". After breastfeeding they were gone and sad, so I also got implants a few years later. I had the same fears for my daughters that you do. Not so much "fears" really, because that's a strong word, but I got teased horribly as a kid for being flat chested and I just hoped it would be a non issue for my girls.

Turns out I needn't have worried, because they're very proportionately shaped as teens, and while we've never discussed it specifically, it doesn't seem to be a problem for them at all.

In general, I struggle with vanity and my self esteem is more closely tied to my looks than I think it should be, and I'm very pleased that I didn't pass this on to either of my daughters. They're healthy looking, naturally beautiful kids, who never fuss over appearances, wear makeup, and could care less about shaving. I am relieved for them that they seem to have escaped some of the ridiculous hang ups I've got. (I credit much of that to never having a tv!)

But I understand why you'd be wondering if your daughter may experience physical development similar to your own, and the short answer for us is- they developed differently from me.

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#14 of 24 Old 03-30-2014, 05:14 AM
 
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I am happy to teach my DD to be proud of her body but I am certainly not going to ignore her worries. I understand the "everyone is different and every body should be accepted" point of view but I also understand (because I've been there) a girl who would like to be able to wear an evening gown, a sexy dress, a strapless shirt or dress, a bikini bathing suit (heck any bathing suit with cups). Telling my daughter that she needs to learn to accept her body and be proud of it when she is feeling like she is missing a part and missing out on wearing a huge number of things that girls and women enjoy wearing is not going to resolve her feelings or satisfy her desire to have breasts.  I remember my mother telling me similar things such as, "Be glad! You won't be so large-breasted once you have kids!" and "I don't see anything wrong with your size". These answers were her way of sweeping my concerns under the rug. They were not addressing my real feelings and concerns about the issue. No, I am not going to sweep this one under the rug. 
I'm not saying you should ignore her worries, I'm saying that if you are TERRIFIED your dd will end up flat-chested, chances are she will pick up on your feeings.
You can be sexy and attractive with big breasts or no breasts, if you dress for your body type. What if your dd complains that she is too tall? Or too short? Or her skin colour is not dark/light enough?

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#15 of 24 Old 03-30-2014, 03:04 PM
 
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not sure yet, though I have worried my dd will inherit the small breasts which i have that have actually been diagnosed as being hypoplastic due to low milk supply. My mom and half sister look nothing like me in the chest and developed fully so it is possible for small chested women's children to have normal breasts if the opposite is true. I would say to make sure she is eating breast healthy foods, there are  online forums and products and natural enhancers out there if you google it, you can make sure she is eating breast growth friendly foods at the very least. I would caution you not bring up implants until 18, many girls are late bloomers so to stay positive I would mention that if she has questions until she is an adult. 


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#16 of 24 Old 03-30-2014, 05:43 PM
 
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I don't want to tell her that I am flat yet because I don't know how that will psychologically set her up for expecting to be flat as well, and you never know how mind affects body in the end.

 

What I don't want to do is replicate my own mother's approach, which was to basically (a) avoid the topic altogether, and (b) if I brought it up, tell me how great it is to be flat and how thankful I will be when I am older that I don't have huge breasts and how there is nothing wrong or abnormal about my breasts. When a friend brings up an issue that she is concerned about, telling your friend that you don't see anything wrong and that she must "look on the bright side" is not the right approach.

 

I think you need to be HONEST with her. Right now you are lying to your DD about what size your breast are, which, ultimately, will teach you that you are not capable of being straight with her. I think that continuing to lie to her about the size of your own breast could have a bigger impact that just telling her the truth.

 

You have implants, which is fine. Being OK with this is part of accepting your own body.

 

I think that being authentic and real with our teen daughters is one of the best gifts we can give them.

 

When our friends have problems and talk about them, they mostly want us to validate how they feel. The whole puberty thing is scary for kids, though the specific worries vary from child to child. Many kids are bothered by what is happening in their own bodies, and other are worried about what isn't happening. They get so many messages that their body shape/size means so much about them as a person, and they are so concerned that their body won't be "right."  I think that it sounds like your mom failed to validate your concerns, so you never really felt heard or understand. You can let your DD know that you hear her, really hear her. That you understand how she feels.

 

which, I believe, is often what our friends want from us when they have problems - just to feel heard and understood

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#17 of 24 Old 03-31-2014, 02:32 AM - Thread Starter
 
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I think you need to be HONEST with her. Right now you are lying to your DD about what size your breast are, which, ultimately, will teach you that you are not capable of being straight with her. I think that continuing to lie to her about the size of your own breast could have a bigger impact that just telling her the truth.

 

You have implants, which is fine. Being OK with this is part of accepting your own body.

 

I think that being authentic and real with our teen daughters is one of the best gifts we can give them.

 

When our friends have problems and talk about them, they mostly want us to validate how they feel. The whole puberty thing is scary for kids, though the specific worries vary from child to child. Many kids are bothered by what is happening in their own bodies, and other are worried about what isn't happening. They get so many messages that their body shape/size means so much about them as a person, and they are so concerned that their body won't be "right."  I think that it sounds like your mom failed to validate your concerns, so you never really felt heard or understand. You can let your DD know that you hear her, really hear her. That you understand how she feels.

 

which, I believe, is often what our friends want from us when they have problems - just to feel heard and understood

 

Honestly, I completely see your point. I'm very torn about telling her. On the one hand, yes, I want to disclose all in the interests of being authentic and real as you put it. On the other hand, I don't want to set her up with an **expectation** that she's going to be flat-chested because I was flat-chested. 


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#18 of 24 Old 03-31-2014, 02:39 AM - Thread Starter
 
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I'm not saying you should ignore her worries, I'm saying that if you are TERRIFIED your dd will end up flat-chested, chances are she will pick up on your feeings.
You can be sexy and attractive with big breasts or no breasts, if you dress for your body type. What if your dd complains that she is too tall? Or too short? Or her skin colour is not dark/light enough?

 

If she complained that she was too tall and or too short and she fell within the norms, I would validate her wish to be taller or shorter and tell her that (unfortunately), there's not much we can do about that that, as she is totally within the norm and she does not have any disorder or abnormality. If she complained that she was too tall or too short and did NOT fall within the norm, I would take her to a doctor and check for hormonal imbalance or chromosomal disorder (as extreme height variance is usually due to this). I do not think that you can compare this to skin colour AT ALL, unless are talking about skin that was green or prune coloured, in which case yes, we would definitely be seeking help. I'm not talking about variations within the norm. I'm talking about a variation that is genetically considered an abnormality, aesthetically is definitely not within the norm, and can be due to either a genetic mutation or a hormonal disorder. 


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#19 of 24 Old 03-31-2014, 06:24 AM
 
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Honestly, I completely see your point. I'm very torn about telling her. On the one hand, yes, I want to disclose all in the interests of being authentic and real as you put it. On the other hand, I don't want to set her up with an **expectation** that she's going to be flat-chested because I was flat-chested. 
But it is what it is. Your mother has breasts, you didn't. So, you are not like your mother. There is no reason to believe that your DD will develop like you did. I think you need to tell her your truth.
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#20 of 24 Old 03-31-2014, 06:25 AM
 
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RomanGoddess, you mentioned that your sisters also have this condition. Does your mother? Do you feel like it's something that might be passed down maternally or do you think it was just spontaneous in your case, or could it have come from your dad's side?

 

If your daughter knows your sisters (you said they didn't do implants?) I think it's reasonable to point to them and say some people in our family don't develop much and maybe point to someone else in your dd's dad's side and say, but some do. She's got genes from both sides so who knows...


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I think I missed that part. But I still think you need to talk with her if she's asking questions.
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#22 of 24 Old 03-31-2014, 07:50 AM
 
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Insufficient breast tissue (can be very, very small, boy-like breasts) is called "Breast Hypoplasia". ("Hypoplasia" just means underdevelopment or incomplete development and can refer to other parts of the body, too, such as tooth enamel.) This is not a terribly uncommon condition. During your pregnancies did you experience any breast changes? I don't know if you would with the implants and surgery for them. Have any of your sisters been pregnant and experienced any breast changes or nursed even a tiny bit? If so, using google medical credentials my armchair diagnosis would be severe breast hypoplasia. Women with breast hypoplasia or insufficient glandular tissue usually have a lot of difficulty nursing, but some are able to nurse a little bit and supplement with bottle feeding. 

 

Complete absence of breast tissue is extremely rare and is called "amazia". It is often only on one side and associated with various syndromes. It can occur on both sides, but is even less common. Another rare condition is called "amastia". Sometimes the two are confused. Amastia is a complete absence of breast tissue, but also the nipple and areola —nothing at all.

 

I think it's worth talking to a doctor about, but I don't know if I'd bring all the medical stuff up to your daughter yet. Maybe you can chat with your own doctor about your history and your concern about your daughter.

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#23 of 24 Old 03-31-2014, 08:50 AM
 
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It sounds like you might have tuberous breasts. Were you able to breastfeed?

There is not much known about tuberous breasts. There does seem to be a genetic link. My sister and I both have them. She did not develop breast tissue, and only developed large areolas. I developed large areolas first, but did go on to develop breast tissue. I was able to nurse quite well. We know of no one else in our family that had this condition - our mother has fantastic breasts! So not fair.

We both faced harsh self esteem issues because of our deformities. Being able to breastfeed my children helped me come to terms with it. They served their purpose, ya know?

I also was extremely worried about my own daughter. We decided that if she develops the type with no breast tissue, we would spring for appropriate implants when the time is appropriate. I know the heartache of looking different, and I wouldn't wish that on her.
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#24 of 24 Old 04-05-2014, 11:40 PM - Thread Starter
 
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It's been a while since I've been able to get back to this thread. In answer to the questions:

 

Tuberous breasts: the jury is out (at least for me it is). When I look at images of tuberous breasts, most of them do not look anything like mine, because I was flat. But the protruding areola certainly would suggest that they are tuberous. Here is the photo that I think best reflects what mine looked like before implants:

 

http://www.drsalibian.com/wp-content/themes/salibian/images/BA5-2.jpg

 

Breastfeeding: The breast implants were placed under the muscle and the incision was in the armpit, so the surgery did not affect breastfeeding. My breasts changed in size during both my pregnancies. During the first pregnancy, the midwife said that she did not think I had tuberous breasts, as it was very obvious that my breasts had changed during the pregnancy.  She did say that I would have to breastfeed often because of their small size and therefore small storage capacity. I was able to breastfeed both my children. I became engorged with milk within three days of the birth of my first child. Thereafter, I had to nurse my daughter at least every hour and sometimes more often because my breasts could not store that much milk at once. I also had to supplement because, well, sometimes she want want milk and I just didn't have any other than the trickle that my boobs were producing on tap because nothing left was stored. On the other hand, by about 2.5 months, I was able to exclusively breastfeed and at 4 months, I was able to pump 200 ml in one sitting (both breasts combined). For the second child, I was able to breastfeed exclusively, just barely, nursing my son very very very often. He dropped percentile points on the curve but as he was born in the 90th percentile (9.5 pounds) he had a lot of excess fat and the doctor was not worried.

 

My middle sister has a bit more tissue than me (maybe AA or AAA) and breastfed all four of her children without supplementing until she decided to wean. I'm not sure they were tuberous breasts.

 

My mother and sisters: I have always known her with breasts (normal shaped, not tuberous), previously size A, now a B post-menopause. She insists that she "had nothing" before children. Who knows, but to me this would be a radical change if she went from looking like me to looking like she does now. Note that my breast size has not changed at all since children, nor has my sister's, size AA or AAA and has given birth to six children. My oldest sister also remained flat-chested at menopause (no children).

 

I emailed my oldest sister to ask her if she thought she had tuberous breasts, and showed her some photos. She now thinks she does. She is almost flat like me, maybe has a bit more tissue. My middle sister has slightly more tissue, as I mentioned above. I don't think that either of them had the protruding nipples like I did, though.

 

During my visit to the gynecologist this summer, I'll see what she says. It's difficult to see what my breasts were like before, due to (a) implants and (b) 4+ years of breastfeeding that has change the areolas and nipples a lot.

 

I am worried that my daughter is already getting pubic hair but still no breast development at all, which was exactly my path.


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