Could my daughter possibly have an Autism Spectrum disorder? - Mothering Forums

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Old 05-09-2014, 09:04 AM - Thread Starter
 
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A few days ago, I posted a question on here asking about my daughter's behaviours. Every single person that replied mentioned an Autism Spectrum disorder.  So, I thought I would ask about that specifically. :)

 

 

 

1.Her facial expressions don't match her emotions. 
2. She can't make eye contact when she's talking to people. 
3.It's very hard for her to make friends, or start a conversation. 
4. There's a delay for her to reply to you 
5.When she hears something, she'll repeat it a couple times. 
6.Rocks back and forth or side to side. 
7. NEEDS to do things the same way over and over. 
8. Sometimes she won't get a joke until way later than the rest of us, or she won't understand when someone is using sarcasm. 
9. Takes expressions literally sometimes. 
10.If she burns herself with a straightener, she won't even flinch. She'll just continue on as normal. 
11. When we're in the car, and the music plays at a level that's sort of quiet, she'll cover her ears and say it's too loud. 

She'll also have other strange little habits. She'll be staring into space rocking back and forth and fiddling with something. I always see her do this. 

12. I don't know if this could have anything to do with it, or if it even matters, but she's very uncoordinated and clumsy. 
13. Likes doing things on her own, as apposed to doing things with others. (Friends, or family.) 

14. She has trouble following verbal instructions.

15. She can't explain throughly what she wants and it seems, like she expects us to know what she wants without having to tell us.

16.She can't stand being hugged, or tapped on the shoulder.

17.When we call her, she's unresponsive sometimes

18. She has all the OCD symptoms, except superstitious thoughts. (Sometimes she has to wash her hands for up to 260 seconds..This makes her hands bleed, but if she doesn't do it she'll become very anxious.)

19. She also has some ADHD like symptoms, like zoning out even when people are talking to her, and switching back and forth from different activities. 

20. She'll need to arrange things perfectly, and in the same order. They can't be out of order or she gets very anxious.

21. She hates it when people touch her stuff. (She'll get all anxious and tell them they're ruining it.)

 

So, last post I thought I was maybe just being a nervous mother..But lots of people have said that this behaviour seems odd even to them. So, once again, What are your thoughts?

 

Thanks !:)

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Old 05-09-2014, 12:37 PM
 
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When a person posts a handful of specific observations that concern her, it's possible that people reading that post can miss the picture. I responded in the other thread, and my questions remain: 

 

Is this stuff mostly new or recent? 

How does she do socially, particularly at maintaining friendships and casual conversation?

Have the teachers, mentors and other adults in her life mentioned similar concerns and observations?

 

"Yes, pretty well, and no" would put your question in a very different context than "No, poorly and yes." 

 

Miranda


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Old 05-09-2014, 01:19 PM
 
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Jenna, this may seem really obvious, but have you checked with your pediatrician or had any formal testing done? Maybe I missed that in a previous post. As helpful as other parents can be, it sounds like you need some expert input here. The Autism Society might also be of help:  http://www.autism-society.org.

 

Keep loving your daughter in every way possible. You have been uniquely chosen to be her mom and her advocate and will make good decisions regarding her care. Wishing your family all the best.

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Old 05-09-2014, 09:23 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Originally Posted by moominmamma View Post
 

When a person posts a handful of specific observations that concern her, it's possible that people reading that post can miss the picture. I responded in the other thread, and my questions remain: 

 

Is this stuff mostly new or recent? 

How does she do socially, particularly at maintaining friendships and casual conversation?

Have the teachers, mentors and other adults in her life mentioned similar concerns and observations?

 

"Yes, pretty well, and no" would put your question in a very different context than "No, poorly and yes." 

 

Miranda

Yes, you're right I forgot to add that information. Sorry! 

 

This stuff is not new. She's had this stuff since she was a little girl. She's very poor at maintaining conversations, also. And yes, others have noticed. They noticed how she acts around peers and in other situations. Thanks!

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Old 05-10-2014, 04:24 AM
 
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Based on what you've posted I think you have very good grounds for getting her assessed for an Autistic Spectrum Disorder, the symptoms you describe do sound like she has an ASD &/or sensory integration issues. The fact that she's got to 14 without it being picked up on suggests it's not very severe (this is often the case with females), but it does sound like it's enough to affect her life and may cause problems for her as an adult so it's definitely worth seeking help for her, to help her develop skills that don't come naturally to her etc. As someone who realised as an adult I had ADHD I can tell you that even someone who seems to be "coping" with symptoms of a disorder like this can be struggling a lot in life even when they look like they're managing, and the older you get the less tolerant people are of your inability to do things that are expected of a "normal" person. One day she's going to have to be independent and cope by herself in the world and the more you can give her the tools to do this (without denying who she is) the better her life will be!

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Old 05-11-2014, 10:16 AM
 
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Get a formal evaluation. Until then you won't have an answer.

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Old 05-11-2014, 11:17 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Get a formal evaluation. Until then you won't have an answer.

 I know that. I was asking here, for any people who have the knowledge, and have dealt with something like this first hand. I was asking for their experience. That's the point of forums, isn't it? Haven't you seen all health forums on the internet? They're there for a reason. To make sure you're on the right track. And I wasn't looking for a definite answer. I was asking for *opinions*. 

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Old 05-11-2014, 11:33 AM
 
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I do apologize for offending you. To be honest, I don't frequent health forums on the internet because if I have a health problem I go to my doctor. I can appreciate that we have different approaches. I hope you find some answers for you situation soon.

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Old 05-11-2014, 03:07 PM
 
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Trying to figure out if a child has a special needs or if their development falls within the range of "normal" is a very common internet question. It isn't a health issue, and most doctors don't have a clue. There are plenty of perfectly good doctors around who would blow off a child with a mild special need as "just fine" without understanding how their issues are effecting their life. This really isn't what our medical personal are trained for.

 

Asking questions on the internet is how many parents figure how what sort of specialist call and how to get started on what is a VERY complicated path. Even the comment "get an evaluation" is vague. What sort of evaluation, from a person with what sort of credentials? Anyone who thinks those are easy, straight forward questions really doesn't know much of the special needs maze.

 

I suggest asking on the special needs board -- you are more likely to get responses from BTDT moms there.

 

I have a DD who has high functioning autism, and figuring her out has been difficult. I think there are enough red flags for your DD to warrant a "complete neuro-psychological" evaluation.

 

Check with your insurance -- this isn't always covered and it can be very expensive. You can also request an evaluation from the school -- if you want to go that route, do so in writing in a real letter with a date and a signature. Private evals tend to be more detailed and useful, school evals are free.


but everything has pros and cons  shrug.gif

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