Run-ins with Police Officers - Page 3 - Mothering Forums

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#61 of 126 Old 07-19-2006, 11:11 PM
 
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i have read every post on this thread... And just my 2 cents: My dad was a cop, and an EMT, and a firefighter.... And he is a good man, now retired from all of the above, and his friends were good men... Only one of them ever got caught misbehaving, speeding actually, and there was a HUGE scandal because the fellow cop who pulled him over let him off... So, yes, they do get caught.. And there were reprocussions... (sp?) I think he was demoted, and definitely re-assigned...
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Originally Posted by Herausgeber
I wonder what the relationship is between childhood obesity and kids no longer being allowed to play outside their homes without parental supervision. I know lots of "worried" parents who think it's much "safer" for junior to sit in front of an Xbox all day scarfing down junk food than to be out in the big, scary street. I guess it depends on your idea of relative danger.

I had hoped to be able to fight this unhealthy trend by letting my soon-to-be-born child play outside when she gets older, like I did as a kid, except that apparantly (1) there won't be anyone else out there for her to play with and (2) if I do let her outside, someone will call the cops on me.
hmm.. think we will have to meet up covertly, behind a safe fence to let our children play together away from the maybe well-meaning nosey neighbors...

I agree, the original poster needs to take up the prob with the neighbors, not the officers. These officers are dads too, and take concerns regarding children VERY seriously... My dad has only now started letting me in on some of the horrors he encountered while on the job, involving kids that is... (And I am all grown up-29 yrs old)... maybe his scare tactic to make sure I am keeping his little grandbaby safe...
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#62 of 126 Old 07-20-2006, 10:08 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Herausgeber
I wonder what the relationship is between childhood obesity and kids no longer being allowed to play outside their homes without parental supervision. I know lots of "worried" parents who think it's much "safer" for junior to sit in front of an Xbox all day scarfing down junk food than to be out in the big, scary street. I guess it depends on your idea of relative danger.
I agree there are parents that allow their children to put the child in front of a game system; however, I don't think it has much to do with being "safer." The game systems/television become a babysitter so the parent doesn't have to deal with the child. I really don't see where this has anything to do with playing outside alone.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Herausgeber
I had hoped to be able to fight this unhealthy trend by letting my soon-to-be-born child play outside when she gets older, like I did as a kid, except that apparantly (1) there won't be anyone else out there for her to play with and (2) if I do let her outside, someone will call the cops on me.
Congrats on fighting this unhealthy trend with your children. I definately think that children need to be outside (supervised). My children play outside a ton during the day mixed with game time and television time. It's all about balance. As far as there being noone else outside, I guess that depends on where you live. There are always kids outside playing in my neighborhood although the usually wait until early evening. As far as someone calling the police, if the shoe fits and you are neglecting you parental responsibilities then at least you are ready for the visit from the officers.

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#63 of 126 Old 07-20-2006, 10:22 AM
 
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At the age of 11, in a tiny town outside of Fairfield, ME (Vassalboro) I was chased by two men in a pickup truck.
I was less than a quarter mile from my apartment building, walking home with my 15-yr-old neighbor (who ran off without me, BTW)from a trip to the convenience store.
Luckily, I was able to escape.
What I wouldn't have given to see a police officer that evening. My father went out with our neighbor to look for the men. He was too leary of the police to report the incident, (Not because he didn't trust POs - he worried about getting in trouble for things he was involved in)and as far as I know these people are still at large.

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#64 of 126 Old 07-20-2006, 03:05 PM
 
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http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/tm_obje...name_page.html

Interesting article in an English newspaper today says that kids are actually safer today than 30 years ago. Some snippets:

"Ironically, this hyper-attentive-ness is actually having a damaging effect on our children."

"But too many kids are now starting secondary school having never walked to classes on their own.For this reason, many 11 and 12-year-olds are believed to have the pedestrian skills of a six-year-old in the 70s."

"HEATHER Welford, a childcare expert and writer based in Newcastle, agrees that too many kids aren't able to look after themselves.

She says: "Parents do have to use their common sense when it comes to safety. But, generally, I don't think they're giving kids enough chance to be streetwise. They can't be streetwise unless they let them be independent."
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#65 of 126 Old 07-20-2006, 04:56 PM
 
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I was taking a public bus by myself to meet friends at the mall when I was 12. I think that by the time a child is going to school they are fairly capable of playing outside with intermittent supervision, but I would want him playing with friends, not alone, and I would want a window open so I could at least hear him if he needed me. The children in my neighborhood frequently play outside without many adults around, but I live in a largely Mormon neighborhood in a smallish town, and we have a community philosophy about looking out for each other's kids. Also, the police chief lives two doors from me, so maybe that makes us all feel better!
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#66 of 126 Old 07-20-2006, 07:01 PM
 
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I have also had a lot of negative interactions with cops. I don't think that authority is good for anyone, well-intentioned or not.
I let my 3.5 yr. old play in the backyard alone (we leave the door open and I can hear him talking). People who won't let a 13 yr. old outside alone are doing that child a lot of harm, IMO. THIRTEEN!?!? I was riding my bike to school (about a mile) at 6 with my neighbors (both boys, 1 and 3 years older than I). I don't believe that the world is more dangerous today than it was 16 years ago. Everything I have read says that violent crime is down, and that kidnapping is very rare.
If some cop said anything to my kid in my yard, I would expect them not to answer. I don't need nosy men with GEDs and guns harassing my children. Let alone "keeping them safe."
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#67 of 126 Old 07-20-2006, 09:55 PM
 
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Originally Posted by mylilprincess
I am in Canada too and I must disagree with you. I have seen MANY times cops stop and ask children who are unsupervised where their parents are. I also AGREE VERY MUCH that children should not be left outside alone. I know Canada is safe in comparison to the states but there are still far to many sex offenders and child molesters for me to feel it is safe for my children to be left outside for any period of time w/o me. I know this is a sad thing to say and I realize my kids will feel over protected but they will NOT be kidnapped or molested and that is way more important than anything else.
I was outside all the time as a child - not alone, but with my younger sister. We were catching buses to movies with another friend by the time I was about 8 or 9. We went swimming without a parent, and caught the bus home, etc.

I was molested...repeatedly by a relative, in that relative's home...and repeatedly by the janitor at my elementary school. I was never threatened or molested while I was outside - not even once. Keeping kids inside doesn't protect them unless you're always there.

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#68 of 126 Old 07-20-2006, 10:02 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Houdini
"The number of missing persons reported to law enforcement has increased from 154, 341 in 1982 to 876,213 in 2000. That is an increase of 468%."
I don't have time to check the links right now. Do any of the statistics address how many of the missing persons are kidnapped by non-custodial parents? That problem is much bigger than it used to be.

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#69 of 126 Old 07-20-2006, 10:38 PM
 
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Is that true, Storm Bride?
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#70 of 126 Old 07-20-2006, 11:22 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Storm Bride
I don't have time to check the links right now. Do any of the statistics address how many of the missing persons are kidnapped by non-custodial parents? That problem is much bigger than it used to be.
It doesn't break state the stats from in years past, but here is a breakdown.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Houdini[url
Based on the identity of the perpetrator, there are three distinct types of kidnapping: kidnapping by a relative of the victim or "family kidnapping" (49 percent), kidnapping by an acquaintance of the victim or "acquaintance kidnapping" (27 percent), and kidnapping by a stranger to the victim or "stranger kidnapping" (24 percent).

Family kidnapping is committed primarily by parents, involves a larger percentage of female perpetrators (43 percent) than other types of kidnapping offenses, occurs more frequently to children under 6, equally victimizes juveniles of both sexes, and most often originates in the home.

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#71 of 126 Old 07-21-2006, 12:19 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Houdini
Family kidnapping is committed primarily by parents, involves a larger percentage of female perpetrators (43 percent) than other types of kidnapping offenses, occurs more frequently to children under 6, equally victimizes juveniles of both sexes, and most often originates in the home.
A high number of mothers "kidnap" their children to escape abusive husbands.
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#72 of 126 Old 07-21-2006, 12:45 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Herausgeber
Is that true, Storm Bride?
Is what true? About being molested as a child?

Yes - My grandfather experienced a catastrophic brain hemmoraghe when I was a baby, and nobody realized that one thing the brain damage did was to completely eradicate his grasp on right and wrong in certain ways, particularly sexual. The abuse was eventually discovered by my mom (my grandmother had been bribing us with candy to stay quiet - for several years) and the situation was dealt with.

The janitor (about 50-55, I'd guess) just seemed to have a real thing for girls who were barely pubescent...

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#73 of 126 Old 07-21-2006, 01:11 AM
 
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My whole neighborhood is filled with kids playing outside, they play stickball and jump-rope in the street, they meet at the park, they walk to and from football and cheerleading practice. My kids have been in just about every house (with kids) on the block, and every kid on the block has been in mine. No one would call the police on a parent who's kids were playing outside. We have what is called a "community" in our little neck of the 'hood. We all know each other, we know which kid belongs to which house and parents, and we all would rather go to the parents in person if something needed to be sorted out. If we think someone's kids are going hungry, someone from one of the many churches will be bringing a food basket by on Saturday morning. If someone's kids are wearing the same dirty clothes day in and day out, someone will be bringing a bag full of clothes and dropping it on the doorstep. Not to say the police or other authorities are never called, but it's usually a last resort for serious situations. People are more inclined to think someone's having a rough time and needs help rather than, "Call CPS!"
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#74 of 126 Old 07-21-2006, 02:38 AM
 
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I have two friends who are police officers, and they are fine human beings as far as everything I know about them. But man, I have not had good luck with dealing with police officers myself. They always have that power trip thing going on.

The last time was the worst. I was going over the speed limit and my license was expired (2 weeks, I was eight months pregnant and with everything that was going on in preparing for the birth I had managed to forget to renew, oops.) The officer informed me that he could give me a ticket for "evasion" (which was ridiculous, I slowed way down, put my turn signal on, and pulled over when it was safe, about 50 yards from where he turned his lights on. There was only a narrow shoulder on either side so there was nowhere to immediately pull over. Um, I'm sorry, no, I'm not going to freaking stop in the middle of the road with a car full of kids.) He told me sternly that he could have my car impounded right now if he wanted to, and that if I didn't have the car picked up by someone within the hour, he would. And that he could take me down to the station (and do what, book me? ,) but he was going to be "nice" and let me go with two $450 tickets instead. By the time he was through with me I was in tears. He could have just given me the tickets, plain and simple. But nooo, he had to make sure I knew exactly how much power he had to make me suffer.

And then. Then he told me I had to get out of the car and walk home. Eight months pregnant, with three small children in tow, in 90-degree weather, and with groceries that couldn't sit in the heat. While he sat in his nice air-conditioned car until we were out of sight, I'm assuming to make sure I wouldn't go back and get the car. My children wanted to know why I was crying, and why the PO, who was supposed to protect us, was so mean? :

Every time I drove down that road I felt sick to have been treated so unnecessarily meanly and not been able to say a word about it. I mean, what can you do? Nod your head like a child and say, "I understand." Unless you want more trouble, which in no uncertain times you've been informed would be easy enough for him to make for you.

Although I wasn't contesting the tickets, I did want to have the fines reduced, so I went to court. I told the judge the whole story, and when I was done I was shaking I was so angry. The judge asked the PO if he had anything to say in response. He looked down at his papers and said simply, "no." I can't tell you how good it was to be able to say my piece, with witnesses, and have him be able to do nothing about it. I hope he was ashamed of himself.
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#75 of 126 Old 07-21-2006, 02:56 AM
 
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4LB's, that is truly horrible.
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#76 of 126 Old 07-21-2006, 12:35 PM
 
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Stories like these are why my children are supervised while outside. Why risk it.

http://www.firstcoastnews.com/news/t...?storyid=61467

Rebecca wife of Megan...moms to six crazy kiddos! Seth (15), Madison (13), Zachary (12), Trevor (12), Alex (10), and Nicholas (9)
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#77 of 126 Old 07-21-2006, 12:40 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sevenkids
My whole neighborhood is filled with kids playing outside, they play stickball and jump-rope in the street, they meet at the park, they walk to and from football and cheerleading practice. My kids have been in just about every house (with kids) on the block, and every kid on the block has been in mine. No one would call the police on a parent who's kids were playing outside. We have what is called a "community" in our little neck of the 'hood. We all know each other, we know which kid belongs to which house and parents, and we all would rather go to the parents in person if something needed to be sorted out. If we think someone's kids are going hungry, someone from one of the many churches will be bringing a food basket by on Saturday morning. If someone's kids are wearing the same dirty clothes day in and day out, someone will be bringing a bag full of clothes and dropping it on the doorstep. Not to say the police or other authorities are never called, but it's usually a last resort for serious situations. People are more inclined to think someone's having a rough time and needs help rather than, "Call CPS!"
It sounds like a great area to live in.....much like the communities of days past. It would be great if more communities returned to these types. We know everyone on our street and have known them for five years plus (we live in a habitat community and all built our houses together). I still don't let my kids out front without supervision. This neighborhood is nothing like the one you describe. The other night we had a parent encouraging a fist fight between two 12 year olds and then another fight right after that between two 15 year old which ended with the one parent telling another parent he has a tree in the backyard just for him (my one neighbor is black). Not the environment I imagined it would be when we moved in so I take all the precautions I can to keep my children safe.

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#78 of 126 Old 07-21-2006, 12:58 PM
 
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Storm Bride, I meant your claim about a rise in stranger abductions. I don't question your personal story.
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#79 of 126 Old 07-21-2006, 03:48 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Herausgeber
Storm Bride, I meant your claim about a rise in stranger abductions. I don't question your personal story.
Oh - sorry. I wasn't really making a claim. I'm just curious as to how much of a rise in stranger abductions there has been. It seems to me that there has been a huge upsurge in family kidnappings over the last 10-20 years, but it may just be my perceptions. (For one thing, many "missing kids" notices that I see have comments about the child possibly/probably being in the company of the mother, father, grandmother, etc.)

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#80 of 126 Old 07-21-2006, 11:02 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Houdini
Stories like these are why my children are supervised while outside. Why risk it.

http://www.firstcoastnews.com/news/t...?storyid=61467
Respectfully, I understand why a story like that would affect your outlook. It would give anyone pause. It's horrific. But understand, that for others of us, it no more impacts what we believe is developmentally appropriate for our children than other horrific and rare (but some less so) incidents. Like driving past a family laid out dead beside the interstate after having their vehicle struck by an out of control truck doesn't keep me from traveling that same road with my family; knowing of someone who died of head injuries from a bathroom fall doesn't change our bathing habits; hearing of a baby that died at term in labor doesn't incline me towards an elective c-section a couple weeks early; watching an experienced horseman have his thigh shattered by a horse's kick never made it cross my mind to keep dd clear of them; and reading about little girls kidnapped right out their beds doesn't make me afraid to say good night. Bad things happen, and we all make our individual assessments of risk level vs. what we most value about living. We all come to a different place in that assessment, but I think it's important to acknowledge that everyone's perspective is valid on it. Supervising your children outdoors until a late age is entirely reasonable. But so is giving them a lot more space sooner.
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#81 of 126 Old 07-22-2006, 03:35 PM
 
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Originally Posted by WinterBaby
Respectfully, I understand why a story like that would affect your outlook. It would give anyone pause. It's horrific. But understand, that for others of us, it no more impacts what we believe is developmentally appropriate for our children than other horrific and rare (but some less so) incidents. Like driving past a family laid out dead beside the interstate after having their vehicle struck by an out of control truck doesn't keep me from traveling that same road with my family; knowing of someone who died of head injuries from a bathroom fall doesn't change our bathing habits; hearing of a baby that died at term in labor doesn't incline me towards an elective c-section a couple weeks early; watching an experienced horseman have his thigh shattered by a horse's kick never made it cross my mind to keep dd clear of them; and reading about little girls kidnapped right out their beds doesn't make me afraid to say good night. Bad things happen, and we all make our individual assessments of risk level vs. what we most value about living. We all come to a different place in that assessment, but I think it's important to acknowledge that everyone's perspective is valid on it. Supervising your children outdoors until a late age is entirely reasonable. But so is giving them a lot more space sooner.
Fantastic Response.
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#82 of 126 Old 07-22-2006, 10:27 PM
 
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Originally Posted by fourlittlebirds
The last time was the worst. I was going over the speed limit and my license was expired (2 weeks, I was eight months pregnant and with everything that was going on in preparing for the birth I had managed to forget to renew, oops.) The officer informed me that he could give me a ticket for "evasion" (which was ridiculous, I slowed way down, put my turn signal on, and pulled over when it was safe, about 50 yards from where he turned his lights on. There was only a narrow shoulder on either side so there was nowhere to immediately pull over. Um, I'm sorry, no, I'm not going to freaking stop in the middle of the road with a car full of kids.) He told me sternly that he could have my car impounded right now if he wanted to, and that if I didn't have the car picked up by someone within the hour, he would. And that he could take me down to the station (and do what, book me? ,) but he was going to be "nice" and let me go with two $450 tickets instead. By the time he was through with me I was in tears. He could have just given me the tickets, plain and simple. But nooo, he had to make sure I knew exactly how much power he had to make me suffer.
With all due respect you were 8 months pregnant, unlicenced, speeding, with a car full of kids and your angry with the cop? IMO he was doing what he needed to do to make the roads safer.
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#83 of 126 Old 07-22-2006, 10:36 PM
 
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What does the fact that she was 8 months pregnant, her license had expired and she had kids in the car have to do with making the streets safer?

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#84 of 126 Old 07-22-2006, 10:46 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Storm Bride
What does the fact that she was 8 months pregnant, her license had expired and she had kids in the car have to do with making the streets safer?
Personally, I am figuring the ticket made the streets safer b/c maybe the poster would think about their speed the next time they are behind the wheel of a vehicle. I think the 8 months pregnant and having kids in the car just made the decision to speed all the more wrong b/c she was putting even more innocent lives in danger. I have no idea about the expired license other than the officer had every right to ticket and impound the car.

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#85 of 126 Old 07-23-2006, 12:18 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Dov
I wasn't aware that playing 10 ft from one's apt door was illegal, it's not in our CC&R's anywhere. their ego-mojo or whatever.
Hopefully your lease has no such rules, but it definitely sounds like you live in a stuffy condo community that might have stupid regulations about things like this. I could never live in a place like that. Even our peaceful, kid-filled, tiny Ohio town isn't enough for me. I can't wait until I have my acre in the country with the nearest neighbor a mile away. I suggest you consider living somewhere more family-friendly.
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#86 of 126 Old 07-23-2006, 12:33 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Houdini
Personally, I am figuring the ticket made the streets safer b/c maybe the poster would think about their speed the next time they are behind the wheel of a vehicle. I think the 8 months pregnant and having kids in the car just made the decision to speed all the more wrong b/c she was putting even more innocent lives in danger.
I find the speed issue to be kind of funny, actually. I wish I could remember exactly where it was, but we had a case somewhere in Canada where a guy was ticketed for speeding on the highway - he was driving the same speed as everybody else. He asked the judge how much over the "speed limit" was acceptable, and was told that the limit was the limit. So, he and a friend tried an experiment. They drove at the speed limit, on the highway, in adjoining lanes...and were ticketed for obstructing traffic. They took it to court, and the charge held. So, driving over the speed limit was speeding, and driving at the speed limit was obstructing traffic...

I think speeding is dangerous, but I also think that avoiding tickets is a game you can't win much of the time.

Lisa, lucky mama of Kelly (3/93) ribboncesarean.gif, Emma (5/03) ribboncesarean.gif, Evan (7/05) ribboncesarean.gif, & Jenna (6/09) ribboncesarean.gif
Loving my amazing dh, James & forever missing ribbonpb.gif Aaron Ambrose ribboncesarean.gif (11/07) ribbonpb.gif

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#87 of 126 Old 07-23-2006, 10:50 AM
 
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Stormbride,

Nice response. I've driven the speed limit with my son in the car and had SUV- driving moms or Ford F-150's tailgate me within inches. What is more dangerous going the speed limit or picking up the pace a few miles an hour? We could go on and on and people are going to see what they believe.

Here's something to chew on. There are only two kinds of laws: criminal and civil. If you want to get a court room fired up next time you show for a traffic ticket ask the p.o. which law you broke. It's obviously not a criminal for a speeding ticket so it must be civil. There are only two types of civil cases: contract dispute and tort. You obviously won't have a contract with the police officer (no a driver's license is not a contract with that officer). You did not commit a tort because there is no harm or injury. Almost all p.o.'s will not have a clue as to what you are talking about and the judge, or the prosecutor, will probably step in to defend the p.o. Then you can ask who the p.o. who he/she represents. He/she will probably say something like "the state" or "the city." If you want to really start some fireworks then ask the judge who he/she respresents. You may see an explosion (can you say conflict of interest). You can also ask the p.o. to define "the state" or "the city."

Most people are other people. Their thoughts are someone else's opinions, their lives a mimicry, their passions a quotation. - Oscar Wilde
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#88 of 126 Old 07-23-2006, 01:05 PM
 
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Ok, after having read every post (which some were quite lengthy), I have to add my 2 cents.

First, I'm a granola bar. Never used to be, I actually was more of a chocolate chip cookie, but then I became a mom, so now I'm a granola bar with chocolate chips My DH is more of an organic power bar. Not quite as crunchy as me, but well, I think you get the point.

Here's where I tell you that he is a police officer and has been in the military (both active and reserve) for over 10 years. He also happens to work in one of the most dangerous cities in the US based on population. He has seen some strange things, been shot at, written tickets, given breaks, etc. All that being said, not all cops are bad. You can think I'm biased because I'm married to one, and that is ok, but it simply isn't true.

What is actually happening here with the generalization that cops are bad, or thugs or whatever other term you're using, is the same reason why some parents stated that they won't let their kids go outside and play by themselves. Because these parents hear of horror stories or believe that their neighborhood is unsafe (I'm not saying its not, just making a blanket statement), they assume that it is unsafe for their kids to go outside alone. Really, if you think all cops are bad and are basing that on a bad experience or a bad story you heard, are you really any different? Most people don't hear about the good things that happen in a neighborhood or the good cops, because media doesn't deem that as interesting, so it gets seriously under-reported to the average citizen.

Some examples:

There was a break-in at a local church in the area, and the police officers didn't have any leads. One officer ended up catching the person based solely on an impression of a shoe print left in the carpet. The impression wasn't deep enough to make a print from it, so they had to take pictures, which turned out only so-so. The story didn't even make the news for more than 10 seconds, mostly because it was a small crime. The officer got recognition from his department, but that didn't make the news either.

Another officer saved a man's life because of his first aide knowledge. Story never made the news even though the person that was injured had been shot.

A veteran officer of 20+ years mentors kids and inner city youth to keep them out of drugs and bad situations. He started a program at his department to facilitate this and the program also recognizes youth that exceed in academic areas. He received recognition by the department, but the 20 second news clip just talked about the program.

I know about these stories (and countless others) because the first one was my husband, the second was my BIL, and the third is my step-dad.

So, I'm not saying that everyone's feelings are completely unwarranted, but I would caution you to be careful the generalizations that you make about others. It doesn't serve anyone any good. I've had my fair share of speeding tickets and some of the cops were real jerks, but that doesn't make me think that all cops are bad. It also doesn't teach my children good values if I generalize about a particular profession or population.

Now, as for letting your kids go outside and play alone, I think it is totally dependent upon the neighborhood, your kids' personality, and your own comfort level. My oldest is only 2, so we dont let her go outside alone. We have 2.5 acres of land, so when she is older, yes, she can go outside and play alone, but there will be rules and limits to keep her safe. The only thing that would keep us from letting our kids play alone outside will be the neighbors. They have a dog that has on more than one occasion, come over to our yard and acted inappropriately towards myself, DH and even our kids. Our neighbors let their 4 y/o run around outside alone, but the problem is, their son likes to play near the road where cars are driving 50+ mph. They also do not watch him out the window either. He is completely unsupervised.

So, I don't think that those parents that have issues with letting their kids' play alone outside are totally unwarranted. There are circumstances that it would make more sense for the kids to be supervised. But, is it really that difficult to put off what you are doing so that you can enjoy some time outdoors with your kids? Even if its just to read a book? For me, personally, if my kids want to play outside, we all go outside. Their fun is more important than whatever I'm doing inside.

**when I say YOU, I'm not referring to anyone in particular. Just a general YOU.**
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#89 of 126 Old 07-23-2006, 01:09 PM
 
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Stormbride,

Here's something to chew on. There are only two kinds of laws: criminal and civil. If you want to get a court room fired up next time you show for a traffic ticket ask the p.o. which law you broke. It's obviously not a criminal for a speeding ticket so it must be civil. There are only two types of civil cases: contract dispute and tort. You obviously won't have a contract with the police officer (no a driver's license is not a contract with that officer). You did not commit a tort because there is no harm or injury. Almost all p.o.'s will not have a clue as to what you are talking about and the judge, or the prosecutor, will probably step in to defend the p.o. Then you can ask who the p.o. who he/she represents. He/she will probably say something like "the state" or "the city." If you want to really start some fireworks then ask the judge who he/she respresents. You may see an explosion (can you say conflict of interest). You can also ask the p.o. to define "the state" or "the city."
I just have to add, that I would be very surprised if the first in this series of questions even got answered. It doesn't pertain to the fact at hand, no matter how you construe it, and I doubt any judge would let it go on and on to the point of erruption.
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#90 of 126 Old 07-23-2006, 06:31 PM
 
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I just have to add, that I would be very surprised if the first in this series of questions even got answered. It doesn't pertain to the fact at hand, no matter how you construe it, and I doubt any judge would let it go on and on to the point of erruption.
First of all, I have had and do have p.o's that are friends. They, like so many others, have a thankless job. Every time the trash man picks up my family's trash and I am outside with my son, I let my son know how thankful I am that the trash man does what he does. Without trashmen, the world would be in terrible shape. You were defending your husband which is noble and I was offering some info that many, many books have been written on and has occurred in court rooms innumerous times. The "I doubt any judge would let it go on" is a symptom of the original thread. Who gives who the right to "judge" what should be allowed or not? That is completely relevant to the topic at hand (where a child plays). The original post was about run-ins with police officers and how to handle the situations (I gave an example of a court room and how being knowledgable can help a defendant not feel overwhelmed). I've worked with probation departments, CPS and been in court many times working with judges, ad litems, p.o.'s, prosecuters. I know that a certain arrogance can occur when others are given authority. This can be a real threat, especially when someone makes a 8 1/2 month pregnant woman walk home in the heat with 3 children in tow.

Most of the p.o.'s I've known were good, decent people who really wanted to help people. I would suggest that if an officer ever comes to the house in regards to a child, be NICE. They are not out to get anyone. I recently worked with a family where the wife tried to sic the p.o. on her husband for "neglecting" the children (they are divorced). The husband was very nice while the wife was belligerant and the p.o. ended up saying "thank you" to the man for his time and told the wife to chill out or he would have to deal with her (she was yelling and very aggressive).

Most people are other people. Their thoughts are someone else's opinions, their lives a mimicry, their passions a quotation. - Oscar Wilde
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