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Old 03-22-2007, 08:57 AM - Thread Starter
 
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How have any single dads dealt with make-up for their teenage daughters?

Without a female role model in this respect and being reluctant (as a male) to advise cosmetics standards what have you done?

I do not want my daughter learning beauty tips from girls her age - from the way they look they generally need advice themselves.
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Old 03-22-2007, 02:12 PM
 
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I think honestly dispelling make-up myths is the best way to go. i.e., a guy would much rather kiss a make-up free cheek or lips. That guys actually find minimal make-up much more attractive than lots of make-up, and that some guys prefer women without any make-up at all!

My dh is one of those who dislikes make-up completely. I never wore a whole lot (not a foundation type of gal), but what I did wear I threw out after dh told me I was much sexier and kissable without it.

I know you probably don't want to encourage your teen to be kissing lots of boys, either, but my point is that the whole idea behind make-up is making yourself more attractive for the opposite sex (and to fit in, of course, but that's a lot less important to most girls for this particular thing). If you can communicate to her that less is actually more, it would probably be the biggest favor you could do her.

Oh, and I'd have that conversation with her as a kid/pre-teen, BEFORE she starts buying and wearing make-up.

HTH

Julia
dd 1 year old
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Old 03-22-2007, 02:49 PM
 
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there is a book called "teen Beauty" by the makeup artist bobby brown - it's message is very low maintance + less is more. Maybe that would help.
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Old 03-22-2007, 02:57 PM
 
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My understanding is that you can actually find "applying make-up" classes at local community centers. My wife and my daughter will probably take one together in a few years (my wife doesn't wear makeup, so...).
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Old 03-22-2007, 03:34 PM
 
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Old 03-22-2007, 04:58 PM
 
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makeup is somethin that does happen i started wearing it in the 6th grade and let me tell you it looked bad! they offer free make overs at like macy's and those type of stores you might want to take her to a place like that they can teach her something minimal. but looking at how old your daughter is you seem to have time the styles will have changed by then and who knows electric green eyeliner may be in so minimal wont be the style
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Old 03-22-2007, 05:33 PM
 
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you can also often get free makeovers at places like Bare minerals and Merle Norman. Merle Norman I know will give you a sheet of paper laying out exactly what they did to attain the look you got that day so you can repeat it at home. you could go with your daughter and tell them what you'd like - a youthful, pretty, uncomplicated makeup situation. i'm sure they would be happy to oblige. hth
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Old 03-22-2007, 06:24 PM
 
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Here's a suggestion based on personal experience:

I was not allowed to wear makeup until I was "officially" a teenager, 13 years old.

For my 13th birthday present, my mother took me to the Clinique counter at our local mall and got me a "make-over" and bought the make-up that the sales-lady had used. The sales-lady showed me how to properly apply the makeup, and it was very natural and young looking. : That makeup lasted me a LONG time. (And I don't cringe at "over-done" makeup when I look at my junior & high school pictures now.) It was a terrific birthday present.

For the most part, I still apply my makeup that way and I still purchase similar colors. (I'm 33 yrs.) I will certianly do the same thing for my daughter.

Mom to my little Froot : (3/5/09)
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Old 03-22-2007, 08:47 PM
 
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I would also worry more about WHAT she's putting on her face. I would encourage her to use the mineral makeup instead of all the stuff that's packed full of chemicals. The mineral makeup doesn't look caked on and it doesn't clog pores like the regular stuff. Just tell her that it will help to keep her from getting zits. I would also moniter the type of media she's exposed to. I can remember being that age and thinking I was supposed to be covered in the junk because everyone in the teen mags appeared to be. Maybe try to subscribe to a positive young womans mag instead, like New Moon.
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Old 03-24-2007, 06:15 PM
 
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How have any single dads dealt with make-up for their teenage daughters?
I just wanted to trespass for a minute and point out that this is the Dads forum. The reason my dh doesn't like to post here is that if he tries to ask the other Dads a question, a bunch of moms respond.

It is the Dads forum.

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14yo ds   11yo dd  9yo ds and 7yo ds and 2yo ds  
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Old 03-24-2007, 10:48 PM
 
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Originally Posted by phathui5 View Post
I just wanted to trespass for a minute and point out that this is the Dads forum. The reason my dh doesn't like to post here is that if he tries to ask the other Dads a question, a bunch of moms respond.
:
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Old 03-26-2007, 04:39 PM
 
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Originally Posted by phathui5 View Post
:

I just wanted to trespass ....The reason my dh doesn't like to post here......... .
... ................My fault. I thought I was on "Mothering DC"....

The gentleman simply asked for some advice to better raise his daughter, and he got it. Single parenting is no small task. Regardless of who posted on this thread, I sincerely hope it helped him in some small measure. Best of luck to you, JWSJ.

...My first post and I get a slap on the wrist. I'm going back to lurking...

Mom to my little Froot : (3/5/09)
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Old 03-26-2007, 05:16 PM
 
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not a single dad, but I have a daughter (though she is still a baby). DW and I have talked about this. Both of us came from families where the mom wore little to no make-up and the girls still went through a "buckets of makeup" phase.

Personally I think make-up is not a battle I will choose. In the grand scheme of things I think we can send a bad message about appearences when we panic about this or that. I would much rather my daughter go around "looking like a clown" than risk her feeling like I don't respect her. Even when our intention is to say "you look nice without any alteration" the intended message can very easily get spoiled in her perception.

But of course I think rebellious teenagers are adorable and I am actually looking forward to our kids experimenting with their own style and self-expression hah even if it means loads of lime green eye shadow (or whatever). We think it is too too cute when we see a group of the living dead wandering the mall, each attempting to be more daring with the makeup, top hats, safety pins, and hairdye than the next.
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Old 03-26-2007, 07:45 PM
 
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Originally Posted by phathui5 View Post
..I just wanted to trespass for a minute and point out that this is the Dads forum. The reason my dh doesn't like to post here is that if he tries to ask the other Dads a question, a bunch of moms respond....
Oh for cryin' out loud. If you happen to be sifting through the "new posts" section, you're not necessarily looking to see which forum the thread is posted in. Great suggestions can come from both sides of the gender spectrum.

I think Frumpy's suggestion was the perfect idea. Her mom took her, but it would be equally as effective for a dad.

Maybe it would be best if there wasn't a "dads" forum. This question could have been asked in the "Teens and Preteens" forum. Speaking of which, to the OP: browse through the Natural Living forum; I see makeup threads there all the time. Good luck!

WARNING: The comments and opinions expressed above do not necessarily reflect those of the community in which I reside; or those of the internet parenting network.
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Old 07-23-2007, 01:51 AM
 
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If my son can drain one can of shaving cream each week by using his pretend shaving kit to shave three times a day with enough shaving cream to shave a polar bear than i imagine my daughter should be able to use moms makeup to make herself grown up too. but they are only five and four so my advice is limited in value but i say take her out to learn how to do it properly. if the experts say that the trick to wearing makup is looking like you are not wearing any then the problem is half solved. lol
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Old 07-23-2007, 02:09 AM
 
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Originally Posted by ShaggyDaddy View Post
not a single dad, but I have a daughter (though she is still a baby). DW and I have talked about this. Both of us came from families where the mom wore little to no make-up and the girls still went through a "buckets of makeup" phase.

Personally I think make-up is not a battle I will choose. In the grand scheme of things I think we can send a bad message about appearences when we panic about this or that. I would much rather my daughter go around "looking like a clown" than risk her feeling like I don't respect her. Even when our intention is to say "you look nice without any alteration" the intended message can very easily get spoiled in her perception.

But of course I think rebellious teenagers are adorable and I am actually looking forward to our kids experimenting with their own style and self-expression hah even if it means loads of lime green eye shadow (or whatever). We think it is too too cute when we see a group of the living dead wandering the mall, each attempting to be more daring with the makeup, top hats, safety pins, and hairdye than the next.
I'm also not a dad, but I'll also go this way.

I wore a ton of make-up when I was a teenager. My mom wore none. My sister wore about half of what I did. I wasn't trying to look sexy for the boys (my make-up scared most of them!) and couldn't have cared less about how to "properly" apply it. I was going for a specific look, and I got what I wanted. I broke almost every make-up rule in the book, but I liked it. My parents largely ignored it, although my dad did make a negative comment once...that was 24-25 years ago, and I've never forgotten it...and it took a long time for me to forgive it. He thought he was commenting on my make-up - but, to me, he was commenting on my identity and means of self-expression. His attempt to warn me about overdoing the make-up really hurt...a lot.

I also don't cringe when I see my old heavily made-up pictures. I continued to wear my make-up like that into my late 20s or early 30s. I knew how to put it on properly, but that wasn't what I wanted. For work or a wedding - sure, I was restrained. But, for me - far from it! Oh - and my ex didn't care one way or the other - he thought I was beautiful with or without my "war paint". I wore it for me.

Lisa, lucky mama of Kelly (3/93) ribboncesarean.gif, Emma (5/03) ribboncesarean.gif, Evan (7/05) ribboncesarean.gif, & Jenna (6/09) ribboncesarean.gif
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