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#31 of 66 Old 05-11-2009, 12:08 AM
 
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My DH has had both German and U.S. passports since he was a child. It's come in very very handy--he got his PhD and couldn't find an academic job he wanted in the U.S., but he was able to work anywhere in the EU with no hassle at all. When the time came, it was really nice to have an option to work outside the U.S. And now we have a European pension plan.

He's also used the German passport quite a bit when he traveled to countries where folks had anti-American sentiments. He often felt more comfortable being identified as an EU citizen than a U.S. citizen.
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#32 of 66 Old 05-13-2009, 05:06 AM
 
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Originally Posted by alekslasce View Post
DD has the Spanish and UK passport, but when she turns 18 she has to choose as Spain doesn't recognized double citizenship on adults. I'm sure she'll pick the British, more useful.

Alekslasce, I think it wont be necessary to choose. As far as I have reseached it is necessary to let Spanish Authorities know that one will keep the Spanish passport and then they will allow it. Some paperwork is involved. (This applies to nationality by birth from the parents nationality.)
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#33 of 66 Old 05-13-2009, 10:56 AM
 
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The kids & I both have American & Australian passports. We only have the American ones because we have to have them to enter the US. I would like to be able to travel into the US on the Aus passport alone, but that would mean renouncing my US citizenship- which i am not willing to do.

Multiple passports are expensive. And I stress out endlessly at having to keep six of the damn things safe with me when the kids & I travel abroad. DH only has an Australian passport, so he's laughing. Except at the passport control queues.

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#34 of 66 Old 05-18-2009, 04:42 AM
 
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Alekslasce, I think it wont be necessary to choose. As far as I have reseached it is necessary to let Spanish Authorities know that one will keep the Spanish passport and then they will allow it. Some paperwork is involved. (This applies to nationality by birth from the parents nationality.)
I understand that you can only have one EU citizenship as an adult. It doesn't matter as they can still work and live in any EU country. Some EU citizens are even allowed to vote in certain elections if they live in another EU country.
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#35 of 66 Old 05-18-2009, 12:54 PM
 
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Benefits and risk really depend on what country you are talking aobut. For example with China, china does not recognize dual citizenship and if you some how have 2 (have chinese by birth, but you have moved away and aquired another citizenship) you are suposed to renounce the other county's citizenship. If you enter china on their passport you have absolutly no rights as a citizen of canada (or wherever). citienship is very complicated there. Can't really see much benefit for my children to aquire chinese citizenship and renounce canada's. When we travel to China, my husband enters on his Canadian passport.
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#36 of 66 Old 05-25-2009, 11:32 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Thanks for all your responses. My dh is from Thailand. I am American and we're living in the USA. We do not have plans to travel to Thailand anytime soon. One interesting thing that I found was that Thailand does not find parental kiddnapping a crime and the USA is unable to make Thailand return a duel-citizenship child. This is hopefully not an issue for us as our mariage is good but scary just the same.

Kate~ Mama to two.
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#37 of 66 Old 05-31-2009, 02:41 AM
 
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Yes, we have to as well for the Kiddo. As a child to a German Citizen, Kiddo is obligated to enter the EU and Germany with a German Passport. And heck, of course it's a lot easier to enter with the 2 same passports. Not to mention a whole lot of other travel....even not that long ago a US citizen was not traveling to Cuba with his US passport just so...

There are a LOT of countries were it is a lot easier to enter with to EU passports, than it would be with one EU passtport and one US passport. Going to eastern Europe is a lot easier with German Passports than it is with American Passports. Verified personal experiences.

The whole "military service" thing might be a completely different ballgame 20 years from now, especially in Germany. Germany was debating for the last 15 year switching to a completely voluntary model instead of a "draft", but hey, we'll see. Having lived there the first 24 years I am not worried about it, all my friends and family found a way to avoid weapons on their hands and so will my son, if he so choses. There are ways around unvoluntary "serving" if that's what you chose to do.
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#38 of 66 Old 05-31-2009, 06:13 AM
 
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Canadian & American here, too, for same reasons as stated above

Shannon, mum to ds1 (8/03), ds2 (6/05), dd (5/07), and ds3 (7/09)
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#39 of 66 Old 05-31-2009, 11:26 AM
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My children have access to between 3 and 4 different passports due to where they were born and where we were born. As stated before, some of these countries insist you use their own passport to enter and exit if you hold dual/multiple nationalities.

The reason we have gone through the hassle and expense of applying for each passport is not as simple as breezing through passport lines/queues. As a PP said, it is not all breezy when holding multiple nationalities. In addition to military service, I believe there are also international tax laws that can set you back a fair bit with some countries! However we still feel that for our family, the benefits are worthwhile.

We live in very intense, global times and it is hard to predict what the future holds. Each child has the right to become a citizen of the countries so we do not feel able to make the choice for them. When they are 18, they will have to choose as most of the countries will not allow an adult to hold more than 2 nationalities. But they can make that decision based on the political/economic climate of the times.

In the mean time as people who travel fairly frequently, we have seen passport/visa laws which constantly change and evolve so we wanted to apply for the passports now. You never know what policy changes each new administration brings to international relations. An example of something simple is that when we were applying for a job in one country, we were given the job but could not get a visa through one nationality. However a new visa had just been issued to my husband's 2nd country of residence and so we were able to take that job. Had he not chosen to hold that 2nd nationality we would have had to turn down a dream job simply due to visa constraints.

Each country for us holds an emotional bond or root so we feel that we have to initially make the connection with the country and then see how everything unfolds as we continue on life's journey.

Something interesting to note is that, in most countries, children do not have the right to give up their citizenship. My husband's parents immigrated when he was a child , but he was able to reapply as an adult for the citizenship of his country of birth.

wbg...constantly amazed by Z , cherishing I , inspired by P , adoring K and still getting butterflies when I wake up with B !
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#40 of 66 Old 06-08-2009, 01:32 PM
 
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DS has three passports, UK, US and Argentine. His dad is Scottish, I am from the States and he was born in Argentina. When he turns 18 he will have to choose two.

Our current bean will have the same but Costa Rican instead of Argentine.

It has been so much easier in terms of travelling and visas.

Rebekah - mom to Ben 03/05 and Emily 01/10, a peace educator, and a veg*n and wife to Jamie.
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#41 of 66 Old 06-24-2009, 08:07 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Eclipsepearl View Post
I understand that you can only have one EU citizenship as an adult. It doesn't matter as they can still work and live in any EU country. Some EU citizens are even allowed to vote in certain elections if they live in another EU country.
That is not correct as such. Certain EU Citizens are allowed to have more than one nationality
see here f. ex. (ok its in German) : http://www.bmi.bund.de/cln_104/Share...html?nn=271632
http://www.eu-info.de/eu-familienrec...chaft-eu/7505/
Other states make it a bit more difficult.

There are a lot of people here that have an Irish and a Britsh passport - both EU countries. I know several people who have French-German nationality.

While we have the right to live and work in every EU country, there are
differences in certain areas: tuition fees for example, you may be a Eu national, but still need to pay fees because you did not live long enough in the country or you may not be eligible for a grant. I was able to get a grant in another Eu country because I lived there for more than a year prior to studies. If I had had a passport of that country; I would not have needed to live there before studying. - it is complicated and rules change all the time.

Regarding the right to vote, yes you may vote for European elections and local elections, but national elections not always. And as the national goverment determins so many circumstances of your life (taxes, social securitie etc) I think it is good to be able to vote in all elections.

I would like to encourage every parent to look into the rules and not to renounce on any right on behalf of their children - they will have to do that themselves.
But, boy would I wish that the rules and regulations were easier to understand and easier to apply...
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#42 of 66 Old 06-24-2009, 09:10 PM
 
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Originally Posted by goldfishkate View Post
Thanks for all your responses. My dh is from Thailand. I am American and we're living in the USA. We do not have plans to travel to Thailand anytime soon. One interesting thing that I found was that Thailand does not find parental kiddnapping a crime and the USA is unable to make Thailand return a duel-citizenship child. This is hopefully not an issue for us as our mariage is good but scary just the same.
Children cannot travel out of the US without a passport, correct? And an individual cannot obtain a duplicate passport, correct? So why not apply for your child's US passport and then put it in a safety deposit box? Wouldn't that work?

Marsha
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#43 of 66 Old 07-10-2009, 11:48 AM
 
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As I understand it, most countries view you as just a citizen of that country, and the other citizenships you may hold are your business. In practice this means that you usually don't have to "choose one" or "choose two," but some countries may have different requirements. In each particular case it's worth reading up on the laws regarding dual/multiple citizenship just so you know what you're in for. I know that the US does not recognize "dual citizenship," which simply means that if you hold a US passport you are treated as an ordinary US citizen in every way. It does not mean you have to give up other citizenships, just that the US does not offer any special status in that regard.

Another area nobody has brought up yet is taxes -- each country has its own rules on income taxes paid by expats, and each pair of countries has its own tax agreement. So you may or may not be liable to pay taxes in your non-resident country of citizenship depending on these factors.

In our case, my dh and dds have dual citizenship (US and EU/Slovenia; we live in Slovenia). Currently the tax agreement between the US and Slovenia only allows us to take the standard foreign earned income exclusion on our US taxes. If we earned more than that we'd be liable to taxation in the US (on income we've already paid high income taxes on in Slovenia). Good thing wages are low in Slovenia.

I agree with the above posters -- get your children any legal citizenships they are entitled to that could benefit them, and then keep up with the legal aspects. They can make their own decisions as necessary when they come of age.

DD1 (Oct 99), DD2 (Sep 02), DD3 (Oct 09)
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#44 of 66 Old 07-11-2009, 01:53 PM
 
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my son has just the American Passport now but we are going to get him a UK passport as well. For us the benefit is to not be bothered when going into my husband's country. With a US passport they are only allowed to give so much time in the country, then we have to go through a bunch of nonsense at immigration office once the time is up, easier to just bring him into the country with his british passport.
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#45 of 66 Old 07-21-2009, 10:13 PM
 
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DD can have 3 citizenships. Currently she only has her Canadian. At some point I plan to get her her New Zealand citizenship (through me) and through her Dad, who also has dual citizenship, she's eligible for Irish. I"m planning to get her registered with Ireland next - hell yeah.

Of course, whether she does anything with it is another matter. My sister had dual UK/NZ and has never done anything with it
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#46 of 66 Old 07-24-2009, 01:52 AM
 
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dd has
costa rica (she was born there and had to get a passport in order to leave the country)
USA (me)
Lithuania (DH)

We got her Lithuania and USA so that we can take her there or here if and when we want with out trouble
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#47 of 66 Old 07-24-2009, 02:22 AM
 
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I have a Polish and US passport. It's VERY convenient when traveling in Europe as Poland is in the EU. It's also convenient if I ever wanted to move there or live abroad for a few years. No paperwork needed.

We're trying for our first currently, and I'm hoping to work out a dual citizenship for my child as well. It's just easier for travel. But, also, she/he would have access to all the European universities without massive paper work and without paying the non-EU payments. I guess I'm thinking WAY ahead of time, lol. They might not even want to go to college. But, I figure, the more options - the better.

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#48 of 66 Old 07-29-2009, 06:40 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Girl Named Sandoz View Post
My son has a German and a UK passport - not sure yet if he'll have to choose when he turns 18 but Germany has mandatory military service (or conscientious objector social service) for boys so once he turns 18 he'll probably just choose his UK citizenship - if that still applies. I agree with the pp who said that rules and regulations change all the time so it's best just to wait and see.
Same here except that it's a German and an American passport.

We got our 2 kids German passports last year b4 coming back to Europe. I just figured, traveling would be easier this way, especially since I wasn't sure if I might travel with both of them on my own sometimes as well and thought it would be better to have it 'straightened out'

~*Val*~ Vegan SAHM to DD (2/02) DS (7/05) 6x and wife to my best friend.
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#49 of 66 Old 08-02-2009, 03:19 PM
 
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DS has Czech and U.S. citizenship. I think it's great that he's a citizen of an E.U. country as well as the U.S. It'll make things so much easier for him if he chooses to stay in the E.U. or live in the States. Czech Republic did away with military service a couple of years ago, so no worries there.
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#50 of 66 Old 12-08-2009, 05:42 PM
 
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Just wondering if anyone or your kids have passports issued by two different countries? If so what are the benefits for your family?
We do...USA & Iran.
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#51 of 66 Old 12-11-2009, 01:08 AM
 
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DD and I have American and Mexican passports, we are going to Mexico during spring break and DS is going to get his passport as well and DH just applieds for his, we did it kind of late. It's not that we are going to use them much, I barely use mine and I'm a Mexican national, the benefits of it is the dental healthcare, is cheaper.

Bethsy, mamma to Leonor (4) and Owen JR (11/15/09), wife to Owen (10/12/03)
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#52 of 66 Old 01-22-2010, 01:30 PM
 
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but some other countries DO still have military service for young men for up to 2 years ... I know because that's one of the reasons my nephews won't claim the passport from their father's country ...
That's not necessarily true. The only ways you must do military service is when you are born in that country or you have obtained a passport with that country and have lived there for more than 6 months meaning you have claimed some sort of residency there! And nowadays, the service is between 6-9 months.. it's only 2 years in Cyprus

We have dual citizenship in the US and Greece. When traveling within Europe it is much easier to use the EU passport than the US one.

Plus having an EU passport is easier and convenient when looking for a job in Europe as opposed to only having the US passport because then you'd have to go through all this paperwork!
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#53 of 66 Old 01-23-2010, 06:50 PM
 
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We have dual and triple citizenship, some of the kids have triple, me and my dear dual.
We checked up on all the rules and whatnots first, of course, and it was fine. No problems. It makes travelling to our home contries a lot easier. And there are some other good benefits too.

-pixie, my dear, and (A-88), N-98, Littlest-06/00-08/00, J-03 & Little Miss Cotton Ball Button-03 (SN), S-05, Hope-loss 09/09, Bean-loss 04/10, and littlePopcorn due feb. 8th -11.
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#54 of 66 Old 01-23-2010, 07:18 PM
 
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After our second child is born we will apply for Australian Citizenship for them through me. So they will have Canadian and Australian. The issue for me isn't so much the passports but the citizenship. This way they will have access to Australian universities/govt living allowance (Austudy) if they choose to study there and would also be able to work without complicated visas etc.

Of course, it does make it easier to travel through the passport control queues, but it's not like we are there every few months...

Once I am eligible for Canadian citizenship I will apply and am looking forward to easier US/Canada border crossings.

Leila, mama to Eleanor (10/08) and Emmett (4/10)

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#55 of 66 Old 02-10-2010, 03:07 PM
 
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My children each have three passports. They are also eligible for long term residency status in the EU if we choose to live there as I am a duel citizen of the UK. About the military service; My kids are both Russian citizens and if they go there are eligible to serve the service. However there are rules like you don't serve if you are a full time student. My husband (who is Russian) didn't break any laws by doing this himself and when he turned 27 aged out of compulsary military service. The rules may be complicated but they are workable. The benifits of a world class free education outweigh the possible problems. The other countries they are citizens of have no service requirements so if they choose to avoid Russia during the time of service they will have no problems also.

The benifits are obvious. They can legally live and work in countries all over the world. They have a choice that so few of us are allowed. They are able to travel to former Soviet Union countries virutualy pain free, something that is difficult for me. They are also able to travel to countries like Cuba without drama which the USA says is not allowed, There are various visa waver programs that they are eligible for with different countries saving money and time. And lets be honest not all countries are treated equally. EG. My husband has a very hard time traveling to many countries as a Russian national (less now with a greencard). Even with an Australian wife he wasn't able to attend my grandmothers funeral because he couldn't get a visa in time. The benifits are not only that the lines are shorter but the world opens up and life choices become infinate.
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#56 of 66 Old 02-28-2010, 02:50 PM
 
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#57 of 66 Old 05-16-2010, 12:23 AM
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DD has Armenian, Israeli and US passports and citizenships.

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#58 of 66 Old 05-17-2010, 04:45 PM
 
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Only benefit for us was not needing a visa to visit Turkey,and they could stay there longer.Given the mandatory military service for all men I told dh there was no way I would want the kids becoming citizens and getting passports.
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#59 of 66 Old 05-19-2010, 09:22 AM
 
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One thing that really disturbs me about being forced to have American passports for my children is that my son will be required to register for the US draft system when he turns 18. My Aussie boy could be conscripted to fight wars for a country he has visited for a total of 3-4 months over 18 years. We have great universities and work opportunities here, and the opportunities that he might have there are just not good enough to make it worth it. However, as long as I have US citizenship, they have to have US citizenship. And while my parents are still living, I won't give up my US citizenship. I sometimes feel like I am between a rock and a hard place over this issue. If I am pushed though, I will chose my children over my parents, & that is not a very nice place to be either.

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#60 of 66 Old 05-19-2010, 06:36 PM
 
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I didn't know US boys still had to register!

Our little puck will have South Korean citizenship which requires 20 months of military service. But when he turns 18, if he doesn't want to serve, he can always give up that citizenship. It won't make him any less culturally Korean, just make him less a servant of the state.

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