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Old 08-16-2008, 06:53 PM - Thread Starter
 
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What do you do about teaching the other culture? History, language, politics, geography, etc! I am white and american, but DH is 100% chinese and only moved here from taiwan at age 24! I want my children to know all about Taiwan and China, and asia in general! However, this seems like a BIG cirriculum for after school studies! Is homeschooling my only option?
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Old 08-18-2008, 09:27 PM
 
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We have been lucky to live in large, multicultural cities. My kids attended "Saturday school" for years to learn Japanese. We also belonged to the cultural centre which sponsored courses, martial arts classes, festivals, movie nights etc.

Cooking is fun - you can research a recipe that is a local "specialty", learn about the agriculture of the region - and the geography (rice needs wetlands etc.), take a trip to Chinatown for supplies (if you have one nearby), and have a great meal at the end of the experience.

Resources - internet, of course. Libraries. A subscription to a foreign children's magazine - often easier than books because the articles are short and they have pictures. Movies and DVDs - use the English subtitles to help!

Your children have a great advantage, if your DH has taught them the language. My father didn't teach us Japanese because the emphasis was on assimilation in North America after the war. I regret it a great deal, although I understand why he didn't.

I think it helps if both cultures are part of daily life - language, food, habits (shoes off indoors!). If you don't speak the language, you could learn some greetings and useful phrases and use them daily.

We are planning a trip to Japan next year - that will be our ultimate learning experience!
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Old 08-19-2008, 12:36 AM
 
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We are really focusing on the language, I buy Spanish books and toys whenever I can. We incorporate my husband's Mexican traditions into the holidays. We cook a lot of food from Mexico (I've had fun learning!). He is really too young at this age for history/geography, but I imagine we will do that too.
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Old 08-20-2008, 05:38 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DoingDoing:Julie View Post
What do you do about teaching the other culture? History, language, politics, geography, etc! I am white and american, but DH is 100% chinese and only moved here from taiwan at age 24! I want my children to know all about Taiwan and China, and asia in general! However, this seems like a BIG cirriculum for after school studies! Is homeschooling my only option?
I'm also trying to figure out how to impart language and culture on my upcoming LO. I was born in Taiwan, but my family emigrated to the US when I was less than a year old. I speak Mandarin fluently, but not Taiwanese.

I found this website recently but haven't had time to look it over: http://www.ocac.gov.tw/english/

Check out the Global Chinese Language And Culture Center link, it's in English. Some content is in both English/Chinese and some only in Chinese.
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Old 08-21-2008, 10:53 PM
 
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I agree with MsApricot about finding a Saturday school so the child can learn their culture, heritage and father's language, although I am sure it might not necessarily be possible if you don't live in a city that has a notable Taiwanese community.

Or, if possible, you can connect with mothers who have adopted Chinese children. Where I live I have noticed that there are a lot of mothers who have adopted Asian children and in the weekend Korean school a lot of the adopted parents take their kids there.
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Old 08-23-2008, 01:00 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Thanks for your input!
I think probably you are all right, study the language at home with DH, join asian communities in activites etc, subscribe to magazines (possibly published directly from taiwan!) And make it a family effort. Keith is teaching me chinese right now, but I also am not learning taiwanese. My DH and his family all speak it fluently, so there are a few words they use here and there which I learn as well.
I think this will be a fun project for us, mixing two cultures! I am so excited.
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Old 08-23-2008, 03:16 AM
 
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I like children's books on the country and e tell stories native to the land and people. Those are just the basics. Then if you wanna get all festive with it, check out kid's ethnic cookbooks so that they can prepare food from other countries.

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