Encouraging a language only one parent speaks? - Mothering Forums

Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
Old 10-01-2008, 03:14 PM - Thread Starter
 
Haselnuss's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 358
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I'm American, DF is German, and we're hoping to raise our baby (due in December) bilingual - however, we'll be living in the US for the forseeable future, and my German isn't very good (I've been studying it for less than two years). I can understand it when it's spoken clearly, but really can't speak it myself beyond a very basic level - so all the responsibility for whether the little one learns it or not seems to fall to my DF. I know it's going to be hard for him to remember to speak German to the baby, as well as just to feel comfortable doing so - especially since I have older children from a previous marriage who won't understand a word!
What can we/I do to ensure the new baby does learn German, and also to help the rest of the kids catch up? If you've been in a similar situation, were you successful? One thing I thought might help the older kids (and the little one later) would be children's movies and books in German - does anyone know a good source for these (the different DVD regions are a problem with movies)?
Haselnuss is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 10-01-2008, 03:42 PM
 
Barbamama's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: USA
Posts: 158
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
We're in a similar boat, DH speaks French, I speak and understand ok, but can't really express abstract thoughts or carry on an adult conversation in the language. And my accent and grammar, well, let's just say that I know my MIL loves me, b/c she doesn't cringe when I open my mouth!

I can't tell you that it's worked for us, b/c DD is only 21 months, but she does understand French, and began speaking it a bit during a recent visit from my ILs. I think that hearing adult conversation in French really spurred her development, and I'm determined to have it continue. I'm planning to host monthly brunches for our Francophone friends.

As for media, we do books, DVDs (more on that later, there are ways around the region code thing) and youtube animated cartoons, and are going to step up our participation in a Francophone playgroup that we've joined, in addition to DH speaking only French to DD.

Gotta jet, naptime is now over. For the DVD region code thing, just google "DVD region codes" and you should find sites that will tell you whether you can, and if so, how to change your DVD players settings so that you can view other regions' DVDs. Sorry this is a big garbled, will come back later add/clarify.

ETA: Most of the media resources we've found are web based -- Amazon.fr and Amazon.ca ship to the states, French Sesame Street has its own website, French tv channels have children's sections on their sites (a la PBS kids), etc. I'm sure you could find similar in German. If you're in New England, there's a great foreign language bookstore in Cambridge, MA -- called Schoenhof's, I think. They have a very good selection of children's books. Last time I checked they would do mail orders. So I guess it doesn't matter if you're in NE or not! Sorry, long day.

And now that I've just rattled on about DVDs, websites, etc, let me take a step back and agree with a PP -- the best way for the baby to learn German is for DH to speak it to him, and the older kids will likely pick it up too. Are there ways that you could make interacting in German fun for the older kids? Just a thought.
Barbamama is offline  
Old 10-01-2008, 03:45 PM
 
FWMontessoriMommy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Texas
Posts: 10
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
The very best way to help your new baby speak German is for your husband to only speak German with the baby. He will convey the emotion attached to his native language and the baby will learn holistically (not just as vocabulary or snippets here and there). It may feel ackward at first for him, but it truly is the best; you'll also be happy to know that the older children will probably pick up more from hearing him speak with the baby than they would from movies. (My last montessori toddler environment was bilingual and the children picked up simple vocabulary in a matter of weeks with my assistant speaking only Spanish with them, even the children who had never been exposed to it previously.) Best wishes!
FWMontessoriMommy is offline  
Old 10-01-2008, 06:17 PM
 
Turkish Kate's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Body in Jax FL, Heart in Istanbul
Posts: 1,612
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
We're in a similar boat. DH is Turkish, DS was born in Istanbul, and my 15 yr old DD is from a previous marriage. We lived in Istanbul for three years, so that helped with DD's Turkish and we are fortunate enough to have a Turkish Au Pair living with us for the time being. DS was starting to replace some of his Turkish words with English, but thankfully that has been reversed and his language is exploding every day. I agree with PP, it definitely helps when the DC hears adult conversation. Now that I have two people speaking Turkish in the house, plus another two that visit very frequently, DS is much stronger in his language skills. His English is a little slower at the moment, but he clearly understands everything that is said in both languages. I would love to throw Spanish into the mix, but not sure how to manage that since none of us speaks Spanish beyond a few not-so-nice phrases.

The DVD region thing is easy enough to get around. We bought this one from Amazon and love it, haven't had any problems with it at all, although we paid the higher price--it's on sale now for half of what we paid a month ago! No way were we going to give up the hundreds of movies we bought while in Turkiye!
Turkish Kate is offline  
Old 10-01-2008, 06:40 PM
 
tammyswanson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Soutwestern Pennsylvania, USA
Posts: 1,481
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I want to expose DS to more languages as well, the problem is, I did minor in Spanish in college, but I haven't spoken it for quite a few years. DH knows a little German and my FIL lent us some German language tapes. I do say some things in Spanish to DS so he gets some exposure, but the one thing I have been doing is, I go online to spanish radio stations and let DS listen to them when I'm online. That way he gets it in his head at an early age the various sounds and hopefully can pick it up a little easier. I know that immersion is the best way to learn, but we don't have much opportunity to do that around here.

Just another suggestion.

Circ doesn't work! Stop the violence of circumcison. Had another UP/UC/HB in August!
tammyswanson is offline  
Old 10-01-2008, 10:03 PM
 
organitarian's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Boston Ma
Posts: 12
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
i have a couple ideas. First of all speak to him even if its a few words say eat then eat in german you have to associate words with things like momma and then in german. Your other kids will pick up the words as well. And there are childrens videos in the other languages as well as english/german or other language ones. good luck and keep it going

helpmeet to dh mommy to ds 5/2/09
organitarian is offline  
Old 10-03-2008, 04:25 AM
 
CarsonBookworm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Somewhere
Posts: 693
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Such great advice offered from the Moms who posted above me!

Working jammin.gif Student Mama to a energy.gif4 y/o.

CarsonBookworm is offline  
Old 10-03-2008, 11:14 AM
 
Kates779's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Rockland County, NY
Posts: 60
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
THe thing about little kids and their learning of language is that it is TOTALLY different than how we learn as adults. We learn that red = rojo, that pero = but, and perro = dog. The babies don't learn like that when they are starting out. They learn on a parallel. So, the ideal way to teach a child learning how to talk multiple languages is to have a person designated to that language and only that language. For instance,
My husband speaks only spanish to our son, I speak only english. Hubby speaks english to me and to people (other than his family) outside the home. This teaches Alex that when he speaks to mommy or people in a store he must speak english, but when he speaks to hubby or his family he speaks spanish. RIght now, we are JUST starting to talk at all and while he totally understands everything DH says in spanish, he doesn't have any spanish words himself, yet.
Kates779 is offline  
Old 10-03-2008, 01:36 PM
 
CarsonBookworm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Somewhere
Posts: 693
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I know that DD won't be fluent in Hebrew because I speak Hebrew and English to her....but as long as she gets some sense of the language....that's all that I'm really looking for in our situation.

Working jammin.gif Student Mama to a energy.gif4 y/o.

CarsonBookworm is offline  
Old 10-03-2008, 01:47 PM
 
RomanGoddess's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Across the pond
Posts: 1,996
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
You can order German books and DVDs from www.amazon.de. You will have to pay a little extra for delivery and of course everything is in euro so it won't be cheap, but it might be worth getting some stuff.

You can also check out your local Goethe Institut - they might have a library or something. There is a Goethe Institut in just about every major city.

Other than that, I would just make sure your husband speaks to your child in German - always.

Roman Goddess, mom to J (August 2004) and J (April 2009).    h20homebirth.gif signcirc1.gif
RomanGoddess is offline  
Old 10-03-2008, 02:55 PM
EVC
 
EVC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Bay Area, CA
Posts: 4,252
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
The very best thing to do in that situation, imo (but based on a good deal of research), is to hook up with some local Germans with kids approximately the same age as your kids. You can usually find groups through sites such as meetup.com

It is really not enough for one parent to speak to the child. Often not even enough for both parents to speak to the child. Gosh, I have so many students whose parents spoke ONLY Russian to them as children (and whose first language was technically Russian) who now at college age can't put two words together (hence they are in my class now learning Russian as a foreign language).

The thing is, in order to develop language, kids need to be FORCED to speak it. The need to be put into situations where they have no choice but to speak and are in some way motivated to do so.

German speaking playgroups are probably your best bet (as well as travel to Germany however often your time and finances allow). If your kids are with peers who are speaking German, they will learn quickly to speak as well.

PhDin' mama to dd (Oct. 2005)
EVC is offline  
Old 10-03-2008, 07:31 PM
 
emmasmommy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Posts: 1,111
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Dh is Swedish and I do speak Swedish fairly well, but other than reading an occassional book to them, I don't speak Swedish with them. We have several books and movies from Sweden (it's easy to "hack" any DVD player to play all regions, you can find the codes online). We are also fortunate to have an active Swedish community nearby with a Swedish language school that starts at preschool age. DD1 is in her 3rd year at the school, and dd2 will start after Christmas - she could have started in September, but she's not potty trained yet and that is a requirement. The school reinforces the language. Trips back to Sweden have helped dd1 a lot. She comes back speaking more and more Swedish every time we have gone. DD2 understands Swedish fluently, but still uses way more English than Swedish.
emmasmommy is offline  
Old 10-09-2008, 12:50 AM
 
MrsAprilMay's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Ohio
Posts: 705
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I'm running into problems with DD learning Arabic. I don't speak it (I don't think my tongue will ever adjust...sigh) but I understand a lot of it. DD understands MIL when we visit. DH just isn't around a lot so they don't get much exposure to Arabic.
MrsAprilMay is offline  
Old 10-10-2008, 01:00 PM
 
Needle in the Hay's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 1,403
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by EVC View Post
It is really not enough for one parent to speak to the child.
My DS has always lived in a French-speaking area and my DH is French, yet English is his stronger language, even though he has had only one parent speaking it to him.
Needle in the Hay is offline  
Old 10-10-2008, 01:08 PM
 
RomanGoddess's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Across the pond
Posts: 1,996
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Needle in the Hay View Post
My DS has always lived in a French-speaking area and my DH is French, yet English is his stronger language, even though he has had only one parent speaking it to him.
This can happen if the child has spent his young years at home with the minority language parent. If the minority parent works full-time from the get-go, it's an uphill battle. Once we moved to Italy, only DH speaking French to our DD was not enough French exposure for her.

A child needs approximately 20 to 24 hours exposure in a language per week to speak and understand it at a bilingual level. Otherwise, it generally just ends up being fluent comprehension or something less.

Roman Goddess, mom to J (August 2004) and J (April 2009).    h20homebirth.gif signcirc1.gif
RomanGoddess is offline  
Old 10-10-2008, 02:30 PM
 
kriket's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: SW Ohio
Posts: 4,609
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by FWMontessoriMommy View Post
The very best way to help your new baby speak German is for your husband to only speak German with the baby.
Totally!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kates779 View Post
The thing about little kids and their learning of language is that it is TOTALLY different than how we learn as adults. The babies don't learn like that when they are starting out. They learn on a parallel. So, the ideal way to teach a child learning how to talk multiple languages is to have a person designated to that language and only that language.
And yes again!

I babysat a German/English girl and this is what they did mom was german and only spoke German to DD.

However, when they start talking on their own it will be a cocktail of the two languages. luckly I lived with a German exchange student, and we figured out what she was saying eventually!

Good luck and you are giving you LO an invaluable gift!!

I'm crunchy... Like a Dorito.
Mama to Sprout jog.gif 4.09 and Bruises babyboy.gif 7.11 handfasted to superhero.gif 9.07

kriket is offline  
Old 10-10-2008, 02:46 PM
EVC
 
EVC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Bay Area, CA
Posts: 4,252
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
My DS has always lived in a French-speaking area and my DH is French, yet English is his stronger language, even though he has had only one parent speaking it to him.

Just curious: How old is he? Does he attend a local (French) school? Because that is often when the problems start: when they reach school age and begin reading, speaking, and learning in the majority language all day long their proficiency in the minority language (even if BOTH parents speak it at home) often starts to slip and sometimes begins to fail them entirely.

If the child is home with the minority language speaking parent all day (either because they have not yet started school, or because they homeschool in the minority language), then that is certainly a different story altogether. Not sure of your situation, though. If he is at a French school and his English is still stronger, then that is an amazing accomplishment on your part! Really VERY rare. And if so, please share your secrets


Quote:
Originally Posted by RomanGoddess View Post
This can happen if the child has spent his young years at home with the minority language parent. If the minority parent works full-time from the get-go, it's an uphill battle. Once we moved to Italy, only DH speaking French to our DD was not enough French exposure for her.

A child needs approximately 20 to 24 hours exposure in a language per week to speak and understand it at a bilingual level. Otherwise, it generally just ends up being fluent comprehension or something less.

Our experience thus far is similar to this: both dh and I speak ONLY Russian to dd. However, she goes to an English language pre-school. At this point, she still understands Russian perfectly, but prefers to speak English and her spoken Russian is definitely lagging behind despite being exposed almost exclusively to Russian at home.

However, she is very clever. She has figured out that I am capable of speaking and understanding English (she has heard me speak English to her friends, other parents, etc. on numerous occasions and it is clear to her that I understand when she speaks to me in English), so she almost always answers me in English even when I speak to her in Russian.

Dh on the other hand understands very little English and speaks even less. And I have noticed that when he speaks to her in Russian, she makes a MUCH greater effort to answer him in Russian.

Kids are quite clever about languages even from a very early age. And I stand by my statement that they MUST be put into situations where they are FORCED to speak the language, because most kids (of course not all ), will generally choose the easier, more familiar language when given the choice to do so. And that is very often at the expense of the minority language.

PhDin' mama to dd (Oct. 2005)
EVC is offline  
Old 10-23-2008, 02:04 PM
 
songbird45's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 1,387
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by EVC View Post
It is really not enough for one parent to speak to the child. Often not even enough for both parents to speak to the child. Gosh, I have so many students whose parents spoke ONLY Russian to them as children (and whose first language was technically Russian) who now at college age can't put two words together (hence they are in my class now learning Russian as a foreign language).
My experience is that parents who do not allow English at home have kids who are truly bilingual. YMMV.

Mom to a little boy (June 2009)
songbird45 is offline  
Old 10-23-2008, 02:47 PM
EVC
 
EVC's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Bay Area, CA
Posts: 4,252
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
My experience is that parents who do not allow English at home have kids who are truly bilingual. YMMV.
Could be. Although I think it depends on a lot of factors. First of all, for this, I would think that both parents then must speak the target language. Not sure how it would work for people doing OPOL, especially if the second parent isn't him/herself proficient in the target language and the parents use the majority language to communicate with each other.

Second, how do you "force" a child to speak a certain language? Do you refuse to answer them unless they speak the "right" language to you? That could work, I suppose, with some children and might be a good way to encourage language--but I would think that it would depend to some degree on the child's personality. Some kids might rebel and in those cases, my guess it that it could backfire.

I also think that in such a situation, it would still be of GREAT benefit for the child to have peers that speak the language. Once kids reach a certain age, they do become concerned about fitting in with their peer group (at least kids in school, perhaps less so with homeschoolers). And a lot of learning takes place among peer groups. If there's a peer group which reinforces the target language, I think that would be optimal.

I remember a prof I once had who spoke a minority language at home with both his wife and daughter. There was NO English spoken at home, and when his daughter started school, she spoke the minority language very well, but barely spoke or understaood English. As a result, the other children teased her And this resulted in her rebelling against the home language--she absolutely REFUSED to speak it EVER. For her it had been a source of teasing by her peers, so she rejected it outright. Even when her parents stuck to their guns and continued to speak to the minority language, she would either ignore them, or respond in English. She would NOT speak their language.

Obviously, not all kids would react in such an extreme way. I don't even think most or many kids would. This is just to say that there are A LOT of factors going into this and I don't think there is one foolproof formula. But I do believe the best things to encourage continued language proficiency throughout adolescence are 1. Target language speaking peers and 2. Travel to countries where the target language is spoken. I think homeschooling is probably a better match with bilingualism than, say, public school, and a bilngual school would be great too, but that's not always an option for families.

PhDin' mama to dd (Oct. 2005)
EVC is offline  
Old 10-28-2008, 02:40 PM
 
Lady Lilya's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Durham, NC
Posts: 3,646
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
DH and I want DS to learn Russian as a primary language.

My Russian is not so good, but I try to use as much of it as I have, since DS is alone with me most of the day. We even decided that it is preferable for me to speak imperfect Russian rather than English or saying nothing at all.

DH speaks Russian only to DS. But, he speaks English to me, so DS hears that.

When out with me, or when we visit my family (a common occurrence) DS hears only English.

Some evenings, or on weekends, DH's family takes DS with them for a few hours. They speak only Russian to him.

During the day, I play for myself Russian audio lessons, and DS overhears that. I also have Russian cartoons for him, that he loves. And simple Russian children's books, that I can "read" to him (usually just books with pictures and the name of the item under it....I can't handle sentences very well).

At this point, at 14mo, he seems to understand a little bit in Russian, and nothing in English. He says a few words, all in Russian. So, I guess it is working.

I am finding that all of this is helping my Russian too. Every time we watch the cartoons, I feel like I understood a little better. I'm recognizing phrases I know more and more when I hear DH talk to his family. I expect that eventually DS will get far ahead of me, and have to help me to learn Russian.

Leigh, mama to Rostislav homeborn Aug 9 2007, and Oksana homeborn Feb 24 2011.
Lady Lilya is offline  
Old 10-28-2008, 07:35 PM
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 1,933
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I'm German, DH American and we obviously live in the US. I bought books and DVDs, CDs in Germany, but you can buy them in America through amazon. It's a bit pricier though than buying them in Europe. Maybe someone can get them for you?
You also should look into getting a region code free DVD player to be able to watch the DVDs (region codes!!!).
You can use onlinetvrecorder to watch German TV:
http://www.onlinetvplayer.com/channe...L1-Germany.htm
Then there are kid's websites, such as the one for the Sendung mit der MAus which is great...
Netflix has a bunch of German movies, among them fairy tales.

Hope that helps! I speak German only with our son, hubbie English only.
nia82 is offline  
Old 10-31-2008, 04:11 AM
 
peaceful_mama's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: #12 Grimmauld Place
Posts: 4,940
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kates779 View Post
THe thing about little kids and their learning of language is that it is TOTALLY different than how we learn as adults. We learn that red = rojo, that pero = but, and perro = dog. The babies don't learn like that when they are starting out. They learn on a parallel. So, the ideal way to teach a child learning how to talk multiple languages is to have a person designated to that language and only that language. For instance,
My husband speaks only spanish to our son, I speak only english. Hubby speaks english to me and to people (other than his family) outside the home. This teaches Alex that when he speaks to mommy or people in a store he must speak english, but when he speaks to hubby or his family he speaks spanish. RIght now, we are JUST starting to talk at all and while he totally understands everything DH says in spanish, he doesn't have any spanish words himself, yet.

THANK YOU FOR THIS. I am stealing your example to use with DH. I have been having this argument for FOUR YEARS. That our children are certainly intelligent enough to NOT mix up the languages and to know instinctively who to speak what language to.
DUH of COURSE they would see that when Daddy talks to me, to people in stores, to whatever and whomever, that he is speaking English and they would understand instinctively from that example. Also that when he speaks to his friends from overseas, he speaks Arabic like he does to them and they would (DUH) figure out that they can and should speak Arabic to that person.

WHY OH WHY did I NEVER think of this on my own?????

lovin DH since 1/04, best mom for my 3 boys 10/04, 11/08, 11/10 one girlie (1/07), one 13 wk (10/13) and 5/15 just your average multigenerational living family!!
peaceful_mama is offline  
Old 10-31-2008, 06:28 AM
 
etoilech's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: where the MILD things are
Posts: 1,299
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by EVC View Post
Just curious: How old is he? Does he attend a local (French) school? Because that is often when the problems start: when they reach school age and begin reading, speaking, and learning in the majority language all day long their proficiency in the minority language (even if BOTH parents speak it at home) often starts to slip and sometimes begins to fail them entirely.

This totally not been my experience. We live in Switzerland. My husband is Swiss. He spoke Swiss-German to the kids (although not consistently, admittedly) and I spoke English. My son has started kindergarten and now we only speak English at home. We have lots of friends that have followed the same pattern and they haven't notices any slipping of English once they start school. Of course you have to work to provide opportunities to use the minority language and be dedicated to keeping it up.

Here in Switzerland, I would say it's more common that not most children have exposure to at least one other language. People here are generally pretty competent in two languages and lately I've noticed eager to share that with their kids. My neighbors are both Swiss-Germans, but one speaks Italian fluently and has spoken to her daughter since birth in Italian.

Anyway, I see it as something that you MUST work hard at (keeping up the minority language), but I haven't seen any examples of what you are talking about. If we move to an English speaking country, I absolutely plan on JUST speaking German in the home. You gotta do what you gotta do to keep it up.
etoilech is offline  
Old 11-03-2008, 05:19 AM
 
RomanGoddess's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Across the pond
Posts: 1,996
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by etoilech View Post
This totally not been my experience. We live in Switzerland. My husband is Swiss. He spoke Swiss-German to the kids (although not consistently, admittedly) and I spoke English. My son has started kindergarten and now we only speak English at home. We have lots of friends that have followed the same pattern and they haven't notices any slipping of English once they start school. Of course you have to work to provide opportunities to use the minority language and be dedicated to keeping it up.
I have seen this work well when the home becomes the "English-only haven". It is much much much more difficult to get a child to continue to speak the minority language when only one parent speaks English, the child attends a local public school, the minority parent also works, the TV is in local language, the other parent speaks the local language, all the kids' activities are in local language, you get the picture...

Roman Goddess, mom to J (August 2004) and J (April 2009).    h20homebirth.gif signcirc1.gif
RomanGoddess is offline  
 
User Tag List

Thread Tools


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off