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#61 of 90 Old 06-04-2009, 10:49 AM
 
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i think comic books and cartoons are great ways to start reading since there are so many clues from the pictures and not much text. DS doesn't always "get" calvin and hobbes but he does like to read comic books.
My dd learned to read with Garfield comic books
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#62 of 90 Old 06-04-2009, 12:02 PM
 
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Isn't that about what they are?
No way. The vocabulary challenges ME sometimes.

There are sentences ds can read and he is barely reading. Then there are sentences that are "Mommy's turn." This makes for a great thing to read together because ds can figure out parts but he'll be challenged by other parts for a good while. Ds learns something new every time we read them (not just with regards to reading skills). We've been reading parts of the same three books every night before bed for a year, lol

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#63 of 90 Old 06-04-2009, 01:37 PM
 
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Here's a random Calvin & Hobbes sample. Vocab words: preposterous, cynically, enterprising, analysis, convenient, character... That's just one random pick!

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#64 of 90 Old 06-04-2009, 04:41 PM
 
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I should write new ones for my kids. The BOB books bore him too now. It could read something like, "See the zombie. See the zombie build Lego. See the zombie build blue and red Lego. Watch the zombie eat brains while building red and blue Lego."
This is awesome! Go for it, would love to see the artwork to go along with that one!
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#65 of 90 Old 06-04-2009, 05:50 PM
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No way. The vocabulary challenges ME sometimes.

There are sentences ds can read and he is barely reading. Then there are sentences that are "Mommy's turn."
So it averages out to about 2nd or 3rd grade level, then? I guess I figured the format offset the vocabulary... it's pretty easy to figure out what's going on because the sentences are generally short and there are pictures, but the vocab keeps it from being too easy.

I've taught a lot of 3rd graders who have reading issues (some diagnosed as LD and some just behind their classmates) and Calvin and Hobbes is usually a big hit with them... and they seem to manage to read well enough to enjoy the books, anyway.

We kept a stack of Calvin and Hobbes books in the care for years, for Rain and anyone else I was hauling... we still have them, although they've migrated into the house...

 
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#66 of 90 Old 06-04-2009, 06:25 PM
 
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So it averages out to about 2nd or 3rd grade level, then?


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I guess I figured the format offset the vocabulary... it's pretty easy to figure out what's going on because the sentences are generally short and there are pictures, but the vocab keeps it from being too easy.

I've taught a lot of 3rd graders who have reading issues (some diagnosed as LD and some just behind their classmates) and Calvin and Hobbes is usually a big hit with them... and they seem to manage to read well enough to enjoy the books, anyway.
It's fun to look at even if you can't read at all, lol. Some parts get very philosophical with challenging vocabulary and little action to aid in deciphering. Other parts have no words at all, just hilarious drawings. Something for everyone.

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#67 of 90 Old 06-10-2009, 10:41 PM
 
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Sorry if this question is a repeat. I am planning on homeschooling my kids. How do you incorporate unschooling and at the same time get your kids to pass the state exams that homeschooling kdis are required to take?

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#68 of 90 Old 06-10-2009, 10:43 PM - Thread Starter
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Sorry if this question is a repeat. I am planning on homeschooling my kids. How do you incorporate unschooling and at the same time get your kids to pass the state exams that homeschooling kdis are required to take?
:

That is the kind of thing I was really curious about. Also, in the far off future, college prep.

As a side note: after this thread and doing several more hours of research, I am pretty sure I have decided I want to homeschool my kids. I just have to get my husband on board.
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#69 of 90 Old 06-10-2009, 11:11 PM
 
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Sorry if this question is a repeat. I am planning on homeschooling my kids. How do you incorporate unschooling and at the same time get your kids to pass the state exams that homeschooling kdis are required to take?
What state exams are homeschoolers required to take? If you're thinking of the No Child Left Behind tests, those are only for kids in public schools. The goal of No Child Left Behind is to empower the parents of children in under-performing public schools. Homeschooling is a form of private education and the No Child Left Behind program does not apply.

In some states, homeschoolers need to prove progress and may do that by taking a test (typically there is an assortment of tests that are considered acceptable), but I've never heard of homeschoolers having to take a specific state exam. In my state (Wisconsin), we do not have to prove progress to the state-- no testing of any kind is required.

ZM

eta: If you live in a state where testing is required, there are a few different approaches that I've heard of. You can explain to your kids that taking the test is a necessary hoop through which you must jump to stay legal, and, if you are concerned about their getting a sufficiently high score (typically, it just needs to not be in the bottom 3rd or quarter), spend a few weeks preparing for the test. Or you can give them the test without any prep, but early enough so that you will have the option to prepare and retake the test if necessary. As a homeschooler, you also have the option of setting your child's grade, and so you could decide to "hold your child back" a grade level if they were academically a late bloomer (allowing them to take an easier test), and then let them skip a grade to graduate "on time" if it suits you later.
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#70 of 90 Old 06-10-2009, 11:50 PM
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:

That is the kind of thing I was really curious about. Also, in the far off future, college prep.
Why would college prep be an issue? What about unschooling makes you think it would prevent a child from prepping for college?

When my kid got to be 13 or 14, she started thinking about this sort of thing... during the last year or so she's gotten more serious about it. Unschooling is about helping her follow her heart and achieve her goals, and there's no reason those can't include college... and she's certainly smart enough to realize that there are things she can do as a teen that will make it more likely that colleges will accept her and giver her $$$.

 
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#71 of 90 Old 06-10-2009, 11:54 PM - Thread Starter
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Why would college prep be an issue? What about unschooling makes you think it would prevent a child from prepping for college?

When my kid got to be 13 or 14, she started thinking about this sort of thing... during the last year or so she's gotten more serious about it. Unschooling is about helping her follow her heart and achieve her goals, and there's no reason those can't include college... and she's certainly smart enough to realize that there are things she can do as a teen that will make it more likely that colleges will accept her and giver her $$$.
There's nothing about unschooling that makes me think it would prevent a child from prepping for college, and I did not intend to imply that. I was just curious as to how that worked out for other families. Expressing curiosity does not indicate criticism or doubt. Thank you for your reply.
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#72 of 90 Old 06-11-2009, 12:23 AM
 
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There's nothing about unschooling that makes me think it would prevent a child from prepping for college, and I did not intend to imply that. I was just curious as to how that worked out for other families. Expressing curiosity does not indicate criticism or doubt. Thank you for your reply.
Not Dar, but I don't think she meant to imply that you were being critical. It's sometimes hard to understand what folks don't get about unschooling as it's just living life. Many unschoolers view college as just another choice in life and not a destination. Therefor, IF and WHEN a child desires to go to college, they will look into doing the things they need to do to achieve that goal.

That said, almost all colleges now accept and even like to accept homeschoolers. Sometimes creating a transcript of sorts to explain what your child has been learning through their teenage years is necessary, but sometimes a written narrative will suffice. Other than that, college applications pretty much just require whatever standardized testing they require (SAT, ACT), the application itself, and an essay as part of that. Sometimes you can present a portfolio of your child's work instead of a transcript.

If your child seems college-bound, it may be a good idea to begin keeping slightly closer track of what they're up to. But it's not completely necessary. It's really one of those bridges you cross when you come to it.

I blog to keep track of my kids' activities. I don't blog everything, but some of the more show-offy activities, I guess. It's part scrapbook, part writing exercise, part "school" file, and partly just for the extended family to see what the boys are up to.

As for state requirements, it really varies state to state. As a pp pointed out, the testing requirements are for public schooled students, not homeschoolers. In Ohio, we do a notification at the beginning of the year which is a loose outline of our intentions and then an assessment at the end of the year. The assessment can be either a standardized test of your choice or a written narrative by a certified teacher. We do the written narrative and my step-father is the one who does it. It's really easy. My letter of notification is something another mom on a homeschooling list wrote years ago and which most of the unschoolers I know use.

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#73 of 90 Old 06-11-2009, 12:36 AM - Thread Starter
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She said "what about unschooling makes you think it would prevent a child from prepping for college" which yes, would be a critical statement had I uttered it. I do not think it would prevent a child from entering college, and I too have read all the studies and information that states colleges readily accept homeschoolers (Mothering did a huge article on this as many may remember...). I was just curious as to how it works, there are a lot of requirements for college and it's hard for me to imagine a child learning it all without any kind of curriculum. Not saying it's impossible or even difficult, I just wasn't sure HOW it happened. My only experiences with school are with the public school system.

I'm starting to get the impression that it's sort of like gentle discipline...by not forcing your children to do something they are more likely to do it. I think it's hard for me to wrap my brain around the concept becuase I was forced for years to learn things I hated and do homework I hated, ect, so I can't imagine someone *wanting* to do those things. But then again, if I'd been given time to WANT to learn something, I bet it would have been different. In fact, my own experience is an example. I flunked high school, took a test to get out, went straight to college and became a B- student off the bat, simply because I was learning things I actually cared about to accomplish a goal I wanted to get to, instead of just arbitrarily following a curriculum that I hated, that was actually way below my level, in a specific order.
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#74 of 90 Old 06-11-2009, 12:42 AM
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Not Dar, but I don't think she meant to imply that you were being critical. It's sometimes hard to understand what folks don't get about unschooling as it's just living life. Many unschoolers view college as just another choice in life and not a destination. Therefor, IF and WHEN a child desires to go to college, they will look into doing the things they need to do to achieve that goal.
Yeah, that. I was typing while eating ice cream and comforting the dog who is terrified of the thunderstorm, so it was a bit disjointed.

When you specifically asked about college prep, it sounded like you thought that learning that stuff would be different in some way for an unschooler from learning other stuff.... and I wondered why.

 
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#75 of 90 Old 06-11-2009, 12:42 AM
 
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I'm starting to get the impression that it's sort of like gentle discipline...by not forcing your children to do something they are more likely to do it.
Hmmm... I don't think it's like that at all, nor do I think gentle discipline is really like that either from my experience. Or maybe I'm misunderstanding. I don't think that a lack of coersion leads to results desired by the parents. I think a lack of coersion leads to the results desired by the kids. Which I think is a good thing. It's their life, might as well let them live it.

If they want to go to college (because they're reasonable and understand that some of their long-term goals and interests might be best served by doing so), then they'll do what they have to do to make it happen. Or maybe they'll realize they don't want to bother and would rather postpone going or indefinitely put college on hold.

The point is that whatever they choose is valid for them because they're unique and autonomous individuals.

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#76 of 90 Old 06-11-2009, 12:50 AM
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it's hard for me to imagine a child learning it all without any kind of curriculum. Not saying it's impossible or even difficult, I just wasn't sure HOW it happened.
Ah. Well, we did use curriculum. There's nothing about unschooling that precludes the use of curriculum, if that's what the learner chooses. For the SAT IIs Rain just took, we had three different test prep books. Why reinvent the wheel...?

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I'm starting to get the impression that it's sort of like gentle discipline...by not forcing your children to do something they are more likely to do it.
I don't know that I'd say that... lots of unschoolers choose not to go to college. For me, it's more that by not forcing my child to do something, she will be able to devote her energies and passions towards the path she truly wants to take.

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I think it's hard for me to wrap my brain around the concept becuase I was forced for years to learn things I hated and do homework I hated, ect, so I can't imagine someone *wanting* to do those things. But then again, if I'd been given time to WANT to learn something, I bet it would have been different. In fact, my own experience is an example. I flunked high school, took a test to get out, went straight to college and became a B- student off the bat, simply because I was learning things I actually cared about to accomplish a goal I wanted to get to, instead of just arbitrarily following a curriculum that I hated, that was actually way below my level, in a specific order.
I was a high school dropout, and now I'm in a PhD program at a highly regarded university, and absolutely love it. So yeah, I know that you're talking about.

 
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#77 of 90 Old 06-11-2009, 01:13 AM - Thread Starter
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I don't mean to say that my kids have to go to college. I only went for a year, my husband didn't graduate college either. I just wanted to know how that would work IF they wanted to do it. The statement Dar quoted was not referring to college specifically, I was actually talking about learning in a general sense.

I agree partly about the philosophy that it's their life and we may as well let them live it, but at the same time, there are some things I think they need to do, like say...learn to read (not saying that it's hard to learn to read with unschooling, becuase I totally think it's easy if not easier). Or, with discipline issues, I kinda need my kids not to hit eachother or run out into the street. I'm just saying that sometimes there are some things that I find is important for me to teach my kids. Just speaking of my own experience, here.
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#78 of 90 Old 06-11-2009, 01:16 AM - Thread Starter
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If they want to go to college (because they're reasonable and understand that some of their long-term goals and interests might be best served by doing so), then they'll do what they have to do to make it happen. Or maybe they'll realize they don't want to bother and would rather postpone going or indefinitely put college on hold.
For some reason you're really just not understanding what I am saying. Because that's exactly what I was trying to say...that if you don't force, they will make it happen (of course assuming that's what they wanted to do, my statements about college were based on the idea that the child wanted to go. I did not mean to say that by unschooling your kids automatically want to go to college becuase every kid has to go to college and that's what I want as a parent, that's not what I think at ALL).
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#79 of 90 Old 06-11-2009, 01:25 AM
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Okay, then I guess I'm not understanding you either. Can we go back a few posts, and could you explain this bit a little more? Why are you asking about college prep specifically on a thread about unschooling? You said it's the kind of thing you're curious about - what about it makes you curious?



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Sorry if this question is a repeat. I am planning on homeschooling my kids. How do you incorporate unschooling and at the same time get your kids to pass the state exams that homeschooling kdis are required to take?
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That is the kind of thing I was really curious about. Also, in the far off future, college prep.

 
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#80 of 90 Old 06-11-2009, 01:29 AM - Thread Starter
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Okay, then I guess I'm not understanding you either. Can we go back a few posts, and could you explain this bit a little more? Why are you asking about college prep specifically on a thread about unschooling? You said it's the kind of thing you're curious about - what about it makes you curious?
Just thinking about myself here as an example. It's hard for me to imagine myself as a young teen wanting to learn, say, algebra. I can't imagine acing the SATs, which are required for many colleges, without this integral knowledge. It's hard for me to imagine myself studying science in detail either had I not been forced to do it. It truly is hard for me to picture someone learning the specific, painstaking things that I learned in school just by living life. I'm not saying that other people didn't do it, or that it's difficult to do it, or anything like that. I am just trying to explain why for me specifically it was hard to understand, that's all. I was not trying to say that I thought it was "different" than other aspects of unschooliing.

I think I get it a little more now, that if the child wants to accomplish a goal they will choose to do the things they have to do to get there. I honestly hadn't thought of it that way.
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#81 of 90 Old 06-11-2009, 01:59 AM
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I think the "just living life" thing can be confusing, because on one level it seems to imply a lack of advance planning or putting forth intense effort to learn things. In unschooling families, "just living life" can encompass a lot of things that really don't look like what most people think of as just living life, like pulling out the SAT prep book and making biology flashcards...

One things that has struck me during our years of unschooling has been that I was trained to think of more academic-looking learning as very separate from "just life", and it doesn't necessarily have tp be. It is surprising when an unschooled kid says, "Okay, now, get me an algebra textbook." I almost hesitate to say this, though, because I think a lot of wanna-be unschoolers expect that after a few months of chasing rainbows this is exactly what kids will say: "Okay, enough of that, let's start on those math goals." And really, usually it's not like that at all, especially with the little ones. I've seen a lot of unschooled kids shift a bit at 13 or so, but definitely not all of them.

I guess if kid who has lots of experience with different ways of learning and knows darn well that textbooks and academic curricula are just one tool, and not always a very good one... if *that* kid wants a textbook, I feel differently about it than I do it, say, a parent stocks the shelves with books and answers most questions by referencing them, and rarely says instead, "Let's email Joe and ask" or "call Mary" or go to this place or this website, or go outside and look, or think about what the answer might be, or scartch some stuff on the back of an envelope.

I'm blathering... but I think schools teach that textbooks and formal curricula are the usual (and best) way of gaining knowledge, and therefore it's important for unschoolers to get out of that mind set... but I also think that at times these things can be useful tools, and we also don't want to throw the baby out with the bathwater...

Yep, that ice cream sugar high is kicking in just fine....

 
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#82 of 90 Old 06-11-2009, 02:42 AM
 
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I think that the "intense effort" you speak of comes (mostly) later, Dar. The thing with young unschooled kids is that while they may enjoy challenges when they're interest is really caught, and thus delve into some deep thinking and intense effort to some extent, eventually they get bored or stuck or whatever and move on until it makes sense. Which I think, as an adult, is an excellent way to learn things, really.

As an unschooled teen, I loved doing algebra for fun. I enjoyed Algebra before when I was in school as well, but it was a great deal of fun to work on equations once there wasn't someone forcing me to do it. That's kind of like going ot bed at a reasonable hour or not drinking too much or obeying laws or eating right or exercising though - there are so many things in our lives that are not precisely top of our list for activities we'd love to do, but which we know benefit us so we stick to it and get through it anyway. Other examples are work output or cleaning the house. The outcome is so enjoyable, or...we feel virtuous or accomplished, that the process isn't sooo bad. Or maybe work just isn't that bad to begin with.

And imagine growing up feeling that work was just a part of regular life. No better or worse than taking out the garbage or reading a book...just some of the stuff we have to do. So in that sense, doing things that are challenging in order to get us to a desired end is just...inevitable really. You need to bathe now and then, and cook meals and clean up and run errands and poop, for god's sake, which takes all sorts of time out of the day, but oh well.

Maybe my two beers are kicking in...

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#83 of 90 Old 06-11-2009, 03:29 AM
 
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I am thinking about offerring my youngest a 'program'. She will read a whole book in a morning, cook something, feed her neopets, take care of the animals, play with her playmobil folks, play guitar hero, let me read to her, and then come to me and want to go to the library yet again.

The other day I had her do copy work, then sent her for a 2 mile walk with her sister (to get her out of my hair, I admit) and she still had plenty more hours in a day. But she seemed extra happy. She ended up outside playing for a couple of hours afterwards

It seems there are so many hours in a day to do all kinds of things. There is plenty of time to be free, to play with friends, to work on the computer. She doesn't watch TV, although she could, and she does like movies. Oh, she is very drawn to watching PBS history programing with me at night. She has watched the new Lincoln ones a couple of times, and often asks me if they are on.

I just feel that she may need 'more', but a lot of my feelings lately don't 100% jive with what I think of as unschooling, so I am thinking we aren't going to even be on the unschooling spectrum any longer. I just don't know.
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#84 of 90 Old 06-11-2009, 03:45 AM
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You know, I still picture her as like 8, but I think she's really older now... whch kind of goes back to the earlier posts...

What does she want to do? I mean yes, you could fill in the gaps in her schedule for her and give her more to do, but I would see this as more as a sort of regrouping time, during which she's gearing up to burst ahead in some direction... maybe she does need "more", and maybe if you resist the temptation to provide it she'll come up with her own plans and ideas for filling her time.

Just a thought... I also with I had a tenth of her energy... maybe you could send her out here for a bit?

 
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#85 of 90 Old 06-11-2009, 06:59 AM
 
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Just thinking about myself here as an example. It's hard for me to imagine myself as a young teen wanting to learn, say, algebra. I can't imagine acing the SATs, which are required for many colleges, without this integral knowledge. It's hard for me to imagine myself studying science in detail either had I not been forced to do it. It truly is hard for me to picture someone learning the specific, painstaking things that I learned in school just by living life. I'm not saying that other people didn't do it, or that it's difficult to do it, or anything like that. I am just trying to explain why for me specifically it was hard to understand, that's all. I was not trying to say that I thought it was "different" than other aspects of unschooliing.
I wanted to go to college. I saw it as important to go to college. It became a life goal. Therefore, I found out which classes would bear prepare me for college, which classes would give me the best chances for getting into college, and then I took those classes, and did well in them.

No one forced me to take Physics, or AP Chem II, or AP Calc, or AP English Lit. All of that was way above and beyond what what I was "forced" to do. I didn't have to take Any science, or Any math senior year at all, because I'd already fulfilled the requirements, already taken as much in those areas as the typical high school kid did, and still I chose to take two sciences, and calc. Plus the other classes I had that year too.

Kids can have a lot of motivation to make things happen, when they have a goal or generally think something is important or just good or useful. Of course Algebra is useful. I needed Algebra just to be a shift manager in a pizza shop at 17. One of the other 17 year old shift managers had a harder time with Algebra. Guess who ended up getting closing shifts, and who ended up Not getting closing shifts? Me, I'd taken Algebra in the summer school between 8th and 9th grade. I'd researched the math classes I needed in high school for the path I wanted, and realized I was "behind" where I wanted to be. So I signed up for summer school, so I could take the class after Algebra, right away in 9th grade, and be on the path to having AP Calc, senior year.

I had information, and I had a goal, and I made it happen.

Unschooled kids have information, and they develop goals too.
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#86 of 90 Old 06-12-2009, 12:25 PM
 
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I'm glad I found this thread, I was curious as to what unschooling meant, still not sure how it is different that homeschooling.

I see how this could be great for younger kids, but when it comes time to needing certain courses to get into a unveristy, do you then switch to corespndance courses? Maybe it is different now, but when I went to Univerity you needed to have certain high school courses to apply and a lot of these high school courses had province wide exams, so do you just learn the material on your own and challenge the exam, or do you take an online course? What if you do not know the material yourself? I was very very bad at math and barely passed algebra, how would I get a child to learn calculus or so other require thing that was beyond me?

Also do you think there is a place for an unschool philosophy in your day to day life when you do put your chidlren into the school system?
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#87 of 90 Old 06-12-2009, 12:49 PM
 
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Babymommy, here's a post from an unschooling mom about going to university in Canada.

She also has a blog, in her signature, so checking that out might explain a lot. I also saw an older article about a 13-year-old who went to college in Canada after unschooling. It seems there are ways to achieve it with an unschooling approach.

In the US, the qualifiers for entering university are different and have been discussed at length above. As for material you don't know, most unschooling parents and teachers for that matter, don't presume to know everything, but are quite adept at finding desired information. Teaching is really about providing access to information more than it is about actually imparting knowledge. In that sense, really you could do anything and everything to find any and every resource available to help a child find what they want to do.

There are lots of folks who feel that they use an unschooling philosophy outside of education, but for whatever reason send their children to school. I think that's fine and good, but I wouldn't necessarily call them unschoolers. I very much view unschooling as more than an educational choice/philosophy though and it extends to the rest of our lives. We just can't help it. Why let children learn on their own then attempt to control them in other ways? We practice anarchism at home.

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#88 of 90 Old 06-12-2009, 01:31 PM
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Originally Posted by babymommy2 View Post
Maybe it is different now, but when I went to Univerity you needed to have certain high school courses to apply and a lot of these high school courses had province wide exams, so do you just learn the material on your own and challenge the exam, or do you take an online course? What if you do not know the material yourself?
We're going through some of this right now, as my 16 year old unschooled daughter just took two SAT II subject tests... exams that test the mastery of certain bodies of knowledge that high school students might learn. They're not necessary for admission to every college, but many of the more competitive colleges do require some of them.

For the literature one, she basically looked through a prep book and taught herself a few terms she didn't know, and that was it. She loves literature and had apparently already learned to do literature analysis just through reading what she loved.

She also did biology, and for that one she took a class at the community college and then studied on her own afterward, because the the class wasn't all that great. I tried to help, but honestly, I took biology over 10 years ago and there were large chunks that I either don't remember or never learned.... so really she did it mostly on her own..

 
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#89 of 90 Old 06-12-2009, 02:00 PM
 
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You know, I still picture her as like 8, but I think she's really older now... whch kind of goes back to the earlier posts...

What does she want to do? I mean yes, you could fill in the gaps in her schedule for her and give her more to do, but I would see this as more as a sort of regrouping time, during which she's gearing up to burst ahead in some direction... maybe she does need "more", and maybe if you resist the temptation to provide it she'll come up with her own plans and ideas for filling her time.

Just a thought... I also with I had a tenth of her energy... maybe you could send her out here for a bit?
She recently turned 10! Crazyness. Sometimes I write 9 still. It's hard to believe the time has flown by so quickly. She is very energetic, and in a focused determined way. She (and my older dd) do more in a monring than a lot of people do in a week.

She really doesn't need anything from me...she is very self-starting and self-determined. She is very much like her Dad. She's very creative and playful. I really don't need to do much. She has her own ideas, but she is also very open to mine. She does some copywork now and seems pleased with it. She has also 'done math' with her Dad. He's a math lover, and more traidtional about how to do math. They use a book. Anytime we've done tradtional book learnin' with her, she's been like a sponge, with no downside to her creativity or freedom. So we will see. But I won't call this unschooling...maybe on the spectrum, maybe no.

So. We are going to do school-y lite this summer. She picked out a copy work book on line that I bought, and I ordered the ancient Greece activity book Chfried mentioned in another post (thread?). She's so open and there are so many hours in a day.

I'll let you know how it goes. But i wanted to be upfront, even though I post a lot in the unschooling forum.
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#90 of 90 Old 06-12-2009, 03:54 PM
 
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Originally Posted by babymommy2 View Post
I'm glad I found this thread, I was curious as to what unschooling meant, still not sure how it is different that homeschooling.

I see how this could be great for younger kids, but when it comes time to needing certain courses to get into a unveristy, do you then switch to corespndance courses? Maybe it is different now, but when I went to Univerity you needed to have certain high school courses to apply and a lot of these high school courses had province wide exams, so do you just learn the material on your own and challenge the exam, or do you take an online course? What if you do not know the material yourself? I was very very bad at math and barely passed algebra, how would I get a child to learn calculus or so other require thing that was beyond me?

Also do you think there is a place for an unschool philosophy in your day to day life when you do put your chidlren into the school system?
The tradional school route still "requires" you to go through this process - but there are a number of Universities which accept homeschoolers using other yardsticks to assess educational readiness for university. McMaster is a good example of a university which is willing to see beyond the OSSGD to the whole person. I've heard Brock is good too.

In Ontario there is also Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition PLAR in Ontario which allows homeschooled students to request credits for work they have done.

My oldest isn't highschool age yet and I am hoping that things will change a bit by that time, but at the moment we are planning on using PLAR, AP courses, the SAT, apprenticeships/internships and non traditional learning opportunities like Shad Valley as a way to build a comprehensive high school program to get him where he wants to go which at the moment is Engineering at University of Waterloo.

Friends of ours who were homeschooled til grade 10 and then entered into an alternative environmental/social justice education program has just been accepted at Pearson College - which is an IB school and looks amazing. A non-traditional route can and does lead to university.

HTH

Blessed partner to a great guy, and mama to 4 amazing kids. Unfortunate target of an irrationally angry IRL stalker.

Holding on to anger is like grasping a hot coal with the intent of throwing it at someone else; you are the one who gets burned. ~ Buddha

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