helping your kids when other parents are flaky - Page 2 - Mothering Forums

Forum Jump: 
Reply
 
Thread Tools
#31 of 48 Old 05-15-2011, 08:27 AM
 
4evermom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: PA
Posts: 8,752
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)


Quote:
Originally Posted by Greenmama2 View Post
We certainly don't see any school kids at the library although sometimes we see mothers whom I know have children in school there with their toddlers.

The library is about the only place we do see schooled kids, but that's because it is the school bus stop and many of the kids are told to wait there til their parents pick them up, a sort of unofficial after school day care.  When the weather is nice, they play outside so we've been trying to time our bike riding then.  But school will be out for the summer in a month.  At least some faces are familiar at this point and ds is entering the age demographic of those kids.  The 5 yos are shuttled directly to official after school care or picked up immediately.  When ds was 5, we'd hit the playgrounds after lunch and sometimes see kids who were his age and done with their morning school program.  Then we had to tweak the time to after 3 to see kids his age.  Since they weren't super local playgrounds, we'd never see those kids again which was hard on ds.  I felt like a sleuth trying to figure out which aged kids were where when. 

 

It really does vary from location to location, even from block to block in the same neighborhood.  I have a friend who picked their exact block based on there being kids in her son's age bracket.  He'd meet his neighbors when they get off the bus and they'd play until dinner time.  And the kids at the city park can be much more friendly (willing to play with strangers) than the kids in the suburban parks.  I know it would be easier if we had kids in closer proximity (like on our block), had a neighborhood park (rather than a community one with absolutely no shade over a mile away), and had a parks and rec department.  I'm amazed at all the community resources, like swimming pools, in some other areas.  We don't even have fast food places with play places nearby or malls with play areas anywhere that I know of.
 

 


Mom to unschooling 4everboy since 8/01
4evermom is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
#32 of 48 Old 05-15-2011, 09:51 AM
Dar
 
Dar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: St. Louis, MO
Posts: 11,249
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Greenmama2 View Post

Thanks for the suggestions. We're not really into sports but we have done/do everything else on your list and sure, we run into plenty of people we know already (like I said, it was a vibrant hs community when we moved here) but we haven't met anyone new (aka school kids) that way. We certainly don't see any school kids at the library although sometimes we see mothers whom I know have children in school there with their toddlers.

I was thinking it was odd that parks and rec classes would be all homeschooled kids but then I saw the ages of your kids... I think with the under-5 crowd it may be a bit different, but as kids get older they may find their way to more outside classes. Also, at least where we lived in California the schools themselves offered some after school classes that were pretty neat, and while kids from that school had top priority if there was room left they allowed other kids to sign up...

 
fambedsingle1.gifSingle mom to Rain (1/93) , grad student, and world traveler earth.gif


  

Dar is offline  
#33 of 48 Old 05-16-2011, 07:29 PM
 
Greenmama2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Mountains of Blue, Australia
Posts: 269
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4evermom View Post



  I have a friend who picked their exact block based on there being kids in her son's age bracket.
 

 

LOL, DH and I actually looked more favourably on the house we live in because when we came to inspect it there was a group of girls aged 10-12ish playing outside who waved at us as we drove along this street. Haven't seen them since though...

Dar - that what I meant by sports. DD does dance (ballet classes) but no sport which I assume are the kinds of classes offered at parks & rec. I actually have no idea what that is but I assume it's similar to PCYC clubs that we have in some city suburbs (not in my area) or Sport and Recreation centres. We actually did a tumbling class at a sport & rec centre last year. The class was huge but DD didn't connect with any of the schooled kids because she had two older homeschooled friends in the class (one of which has moved away, the other one busy with other stuff doesn't travel in this direction anymore).

Grateful mama striving to respect the two precious beings entrusted to me DD '06 and DS '09
Greenmama2 is offline  
#34 of 48 Old 05-16-2011, 11:00 PM
 
zebra15's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: State of Confusion
Posts: 4,737
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 20 Post(s)

Im late to the thread but I want to jump in. DS is 10 and is finally making a few friends.  We've tried the HS group thing, I even coordinated the group and it just didn't work for us.  So I turned the group over to another mom to run- that was 5-6 years ago.  Since then DS and I have been bumming around for lack of a better explaination.  DS did many many library programs over the years but never really clicked with any of the kids.  I also found myself working full time so the opportunity for activities was limited.  Just this past year DS found drama classes and loves them.  While the kids are not the same each session he loves theater and the kids who attend are nice!  He recently joined a quasi swim team 2 months ago and loves that as well.  Again, not overly social but the kids are nice and politics are kept to a minimum.  None of these are 'homeschool only' activites.  

 

During the summers DS attends sometype of 'edutainment' camp for a couple weeks.  Last summer it was a gifted program at the local university and he liked the program- the program was an extension of a school year program.   This summer he is taking some technology classes at the local community college and some 'fun' classes at a new Academy that is opening up.  If friendships happen great, if nothing else the kiddo has fun and meets new folks.

 

We dont live in the most friendly town and at this stage I'm more concerned about DS being involved in a class or program vs the friend aspect.


Mom to J and never-ending , 0/2014 items decluttered, 0/52 crafts crafts completed  crochetsmilie.gif homeschool.gif  reading.gif  modifiedartist.gif

Seeking zen in 2014.  Working on journaling and finding peace this year.  Spending my free time taking J to swimteam

zebra15 is online now  
#35 of 48 Old 05-17-2011, 10:26 PM
 
moominmamma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: In the middle of nowhere, at the centre of everything.
Posts: 5,799
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 95 Post(s)

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Greenmama2 View Post

So I wonder as a homeschooler, especially one who never did preschool etc - how do you actually meet the local school kids? 

Also, it seems nightowl homeschoolers wouldn't have much crossover time with schooled children? DD is also ready for activities in the early afternoon, but then she's ready for the long haul and not the 60 minutes that children who must get home to have dinner to be in bed early to get up early for school have to spare.


We live in a small town. That helps.

 

The other thing ... I've created clubs and such within our community to attract other kids and their parents. The first was the music education community. I play violin and viola, so I started teaching violin to kids when my eldest was 2 in order to create a music education community within which my kids could grow up, and I ran a free parent-child music enrichment class for a couple of years as well. I also started a community gardening club for kids. Campaigned for space, got a couple of grants, etc. etc.. We got together on a weekly basis for gardening, nature crafts, sustainability educational activities, field trips and such. I ran it on Saturdays for free and we got lots of schoolkids coming. The gardening club gradually fizzles as my kids outgrew it, but it served its purpose for several years.

 

My kids are probably older than yours, so their schooled friends are not in bed at 7:30 pm or anything. There's lots of time for us. Today my 12yo went to the school at dismissal time at 3, socialized until soccer practice at 3:30, wrapped that up at 4:30, and then hung out with friends until I picked her and her sister up at the community fitness centre at 5:30. Tomorrow violin group class starts at 6:30. We'll be there at 6 to set up, and my kids will hang out with the whoever is around until 6:30, then group class wraps up at 7:30 or 7:45 and there's social time until 8:15 or 8:30 (or sometimes later, now that it's staying light out until 9). Their younger friends go home by 8 but the older ones are good for at least an hour after that.

 

It's not a huge chunk of time, but my kids don't have huge social needs since they fill a lot of their social needs with each other and with adults. And they do have one family of homeschooled friends whom they see once a week or so.

 

Miranda


Mountain mama to three great kids and one great grown-up

moominmamma is online now  
#36 of 48 Old 05-18-2011, 04:24 AM
 
Greenmama2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Mountains of Blue, Australia
Posts: 269
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Thanks for that Miranda, sometimes I really struggle to envisage how things could work practically irl. That clarified a lot. Yep, I guess the difference in "must go home now" times between my nightowl unschooled children and their schooled peers will narrow as they get older. At just turned 5 it's usually a huge difference. Lots of kids we know are in bed before DD is even hungry for dinner. Did you actually have that goal (longterm social opportunities/community) in mind when you started teaching? Or was it more of a "there's no string teacher here and I can fill the gap" kind of thing?
This thread is really helping me get an idea of how we will (endeavour to) meet the children's social needs over the long term as they mature, and also to have realistic expectations of homeschool groups wink1.gif
rumi likes this.

Grateful mama striving to respect the two precious beings entrusted to me DD '06 and DS '09
Greenmama2 is offline  
#37 of 48 Old 05-18-2011, 08:35 AM
 
moominmamma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: In the middle of nowhere, at the centre of everything.
Posts: 5,799
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 95 Post(s)


Quote:
Originally Posted by Greenmama2 View Post

Did you actually have that goal (longterm social opportunities/community) in mind when you started teaching? Or was it more of a "there's no string teacher here and I can fill the gap" kind of thing?


More the first. I grew up in the fold of a large, stable, warm and supportive string music education community. I knew from before my first child was born that I wanted her to have access to that kind of community. Since there wasn't one, I set about creating it. We weren't thinking about homeschooling at the time, but I knew I wanted them to have that kind of community regardless. As it turned out it was a great way to meet non-homeschoolers and get connected to a bunch of really neat families with kids.

 

Miranda


Mountain mama to three great kids and one great grown-up

moominmamma is online now  
#38 of 48 Old 09-30-2012, 11:43 PM
 
Pookietooth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: SF Bay Area
Posts: 5,016
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by moominmamma View Post


Wow. Is this really a common thing?

 

Probably due to my remote location and the lack of other homeschoolers around me I've not ever assumed a local support group or social network of homeschoolers to be a necessity. I just figured my kids were no longer spending the bulk of their productive time in the walls of an age-levelled pseudo-community, so we had the world at large within which to build social connections, the real community. And that's what we've done. And so I've always been mystified by the importance homeschooling parents seem to place upon socializing with other homeschoolers. 

 

My kids' friends mostly go to school. My 12-year-old has a close homeschooling friend, but she's the only one. Three of my four close friends in our little town are schoolteachers. Our friendships revolve around our interests, not around what schooling choices we've made. That's been out of necessity, but thankfully it seems free of the cliquishness you are all describing.

 

Miranda

I know this is an old post, but moominmamma you are still around, and I wanted to know if you could elaborate about this. I am shy myself and lack social skills (I went to 12 years of public school and never learned them there). I attribute this partly to my ADHD, partly to being the adult child of an alcoholic, and partly due to never having friends as a kid. Anyway, how do you do this? I have no social connections at this point of any significance and am feeling very isolated. How do you do it?


Jen 47 DS C 2/03  angel.gif04/29/08/ DD S 10/28/09 DH Bill '97.

mighty-mama and her sister Kundalini-Mamacandle.gif

Pookietooth is offline  
#39 of 48 Old 10-01-2012, 11:54 AM
 
moominmamma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: In the middle of nowhere, at the centre of everything.
Posts: 5,799
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 95 Post(s)

Hi Pookietooth, I explained part of it above. We live in a very small town where word-of-mouth networking happens almost without any effort. There's a newsletter where you can put out notices about meetings and get-togethers, even just "we're going on Sunday afternoon hikes, and welcome anyone who wants to come along" sort of things. And even though I'm pretty introverted, I found it easy enough to organize stuff here. I started a music program for young children (I'm a violinist) and then a gardening/environmental club for families with children. Now, part of my success in organizing stuff came from the fact that I did have a social network already going, so a fair number of people knew me and were happy to support stuff I was organizing. I didn't have any really close friends at the time, but I did have a fair number of contacts.

 

To establish that social network I started volunteering with local non-profit organizations and at the local school (library stuff, helping organize the arts-and-culture festival week, etc.). I prefer low-key, behind-the-scenes work, for the most part, like setting up chairs before and after community events, baking for receptions and open houses, cleaning up after choir concerts, doing litter-picking by the highway, but gradually I got known as a decent community-minded person. A lot of that volunteer work I was able to bring along and include my kids in, which was a bonus, because people got to know them as well, and that really developed their social networks too. Yesterday, for example, my 9-year-old worked as a volunteer number-caller at a big mountain trail race near here, radioing in the numbers of approaching finishers to allow the announcer time to cross-reference stats, names and locations before doing the finish-line announcing. It was a real, important job, more responsibility than most 9-year-olds would be granted, but my dd has been so busy at community events over the years that people trust her with these sorts of jobs. 

 

So I guess I would highly recommend volunteer work as a way to involve yourself in your community, help make it a better place, and begin to develop a social network, even just of acquaintances, on which to draw for possible friendship and support. For both you and your children.

 

Good luck!

 

Miranda


Mountain mama to three great kids and one great grown-up

moominmamma is online now  
#40 of 48 Old 10-01-2012, 04:28 PM
 
Pookietooth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: SF Bay Area
Posts: 5,016
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Thanks, Miranda. And you brought your kids along, I'm assuming?


Jen 47 DS C 2/03  angel.gif04/29/08/ DD S 10/28/09 DH Bill '97.

mighty-mama and her sister Kundalini-Mamacandle.gif

Pookietooth is offline  
#41 of 48 Old 10-01-2012, 08:50 PM
 
moominmamma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: In the middle of nowhere, at the centre of everything.
Posts: 5,799
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 95 Post(s)

Most of the time, yes. Tried to find things where they wouldn't be a problem -- and could even be part of the solution. Obviously for board meetings and such I wouldn't bring them when they were little.

 

Miranda


Mountain mama to three great kids and one great grown-up

moominmamma is online now  
#42 of 48 Old 10-02-2012, 01:56 PM
 
heatherdeg's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Everywhere... thanks, technology!
Posts: 4,831
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dar View Post

Some homeschool groups are cliquier than others, IME. I didn't find it to be mean-spirited, in general (except for one mess that ruptured an entire homeschool community), but more about what people saw as the function of the group. A lot of people who homeschool want to socialize with people they find easy to be with, and aren't really interested in stretching beyond that. Group activities (park days, field trips, classes) are viewed as opportunities to find those people. It generally works out well for some people (like, say, Rain) who for most of her life has been pretty socially agile and easy to be friends with - and during the times she wasn't, we were lucky to be enmeshed enough with a group that people were willing to stretch a bit for her and for us. It didn't work for some other kids who were more rough around the edges - there was one boy in Alameda who was teased by other kids and didn't really have friends besides Rain, and while Rain and I were friends with him and his mom, it was clear that she was needing to do more of the work of the friendship between the two of them.

 

Since this thread has been revived, I meant to comment on it long ago... so yeahthat.gif .  We moved from NJ when there was less of a homeschooling population there (so there was just less opportunity, notsomuch cliques) to IL where it's huge. How you're treated just really depends on the mindset of the group.  But I find this to be true in all groups--not just homeschooling.  It's a public forum so I'm not going to go into detail, but suffice it to say that homeschooling is absolutely not the clique-y-ist group I've been involved in.  :/

 

There was a comment about homeschooling parents preferring to insulate their kids and I've definitely seen a handful of those, but in both states, it's less the norm of what I saw.  I will say that for people that school-at-home, they seem to have a much harder time with kids who don't behave with "good classroom behavior" at all times and have little tolerance for more free-spirited or less docile kids (even boys).  So that makes it kind of hard for us sometimes.

 

We also have a lot of public schooled friends.  My son does enrichment/recreation stuff that are often targeted to public schooled kids and he's often the only homeschooled kid in the group (which is never a problem).  Cub Scouts, sports (he's so NOT a good physical sport player so he's not well-loved there!), and some enrichment classes plus just the kids in the neighborhood that we see by hanging out in front of our house or going to the park.  He's 8yo.  It was definitely easier when he was younger because the schooled kids are now getting sensitive to "what's cool" and there's a lot of mocking and teasing about differences.  We don't deal with it often but it happens.  Mine has been bullied pretty bad on occasion (held down against his will once and forced to expose himself another time) by kids in our former neighborhood that seemed to be relatively good kids.  :/

 

But I have seen religious homeschoolers who definitely try to keep their kids--even from other people of their same faith that they think "are doing it wrong"  bigeyes.gif  Again, not the norm, but I've seen it.


Heather - Wife , Mommy  & Health & Wellness Educator, Speaker & Consultant 
 
Dairy, soy & corn free with limited gluten... yes, really. And journeying towards peace.  Blogging about both.
 
Let me guide you to find the food and lifestyle choices...
heatherdeg is offline  
#43 of 48 Old 10-06-2012, 07:13 AM
 
rightkindofme's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Bay Area, CA
Posts: 4,600
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 24 Post(s)

I've already been kicked out of a home schooling group as a parent. I had a panic attack at someones house. I was told that they didn't want to know someone like me. Mental illness for the win. I was slightly louder than they thought appropriate (neutral parties in the room say I wasn't screaming or even yelling) but my behavior is too agitated-looking and upsetting.

 

Twitchy people exist. Sorry.


My advice may not be appropriate for you. That's ok. You are just fine how you are and I am the right kind of me.

rightkindofme is offline  
#44 of 48 Old 10-06-2012, 07:24 AM
 
mama24-7's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: with the dust bunnies
Posts: 2,428
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 12 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by rightkindofme View Post

I've already been kicked out of a home schooling group as a parent. I had a panic attack at someones house. I was told that they didn't want to know someone like me. Mental illness for the win. I was slightly louder than they thought appropriate (neutral parties in the room say I wasn't screaming or even yelling) but my behavior is too agitated-looking and upsetting.

 

Twitchy people exist. Sorry.

hug2.gif

 

Sus


Baby the babies while they're babies so they don't need babying for a lifetime.
mama24-7 is online now  
#45 of 48 Old 10-06-2012, 08:02 AM
 
pek64's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 2,500
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
It must have been difficult being asked to leave. Especially if you felt comfortable with the group. I never found a homeschooling group I felt comfortable being with. Every group I found would inevitably start or end the meeting/gathering with a prayer, and I felt extremely uncomfortable. I was raised very religiously, and married someone who presented himself to be religious, and the abuse level was high. After my son was traumatized at age 3 by my parents, I ended up withdrawing from my family and angry at God. Then I went through a couple of years where I didn't believe in anything religious. That made it uncomfortable for when they would pray. And they all told me the homeschool groups weren't religious before I would join. So, for better or worse, I stopped looking for a group. My son didn't get as many social opportunities because of that decision, but that's the way it goes. Hopefully his social skills aren't too bad as a result.
pek64 is offline  
#46 of 48 Old 10-06-2012, 08:21 AM
 
rightkindofme's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Bay Area, CA
Posts: 4,600
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 24 Post(s)

The problem I seem to be having over and over is I don't easily fall into any categories. Anyone who is not an unschooler would consider us unschoolers. Most unschoolers seem to think I am too rigid. I don't know what that means. I am noticeably in the direction of gentle discipline but I do yell occasionally when I'm having a bad panic attack and I liberally use time outs because *I* require them to stay calm. I think that hitting my kids is a sign that I am not in control and I will flat say that to parents who hit. They don't appreciate that point of view. Oh well.

 

We are gleeful omnivores working hard on the locavore thing. I know my farmers and I feel good about that. I have met some of the animals we have eaten before they died. It's a big deal to me. Thus the vegans think we are evil. I'm just flat ok with being part of the food chain and knowing that sometimes other animals die for me.

 

I was kicked out of the 7th Day Adventist church at 13 and my husband is a fairly polite atheist. Anyone with any kind of religion hates us no matter what their religion is.

 

 

For a while a long-time close friend of mine asked if she could live with us and co-parent because she will never be able to have kids. She lived with us six months and it got increasingly bad by the day. She refused to do basic things (like leaving food in her room when we had a major pest problem and she would drip blood all over the bathroom when she was on her period) and I had to ask her to move out. She dropped my kids completely.

 

 

I don't have parents or siblings because of abuse. People ditching me just seems normal. I'm trying to figure out how to handle this with my kids and I don't know that I have a good approach. I'm pretty fatalistic. People come and go. That's life.


My advice may not be appropriate for you. That's ok. You are just fine how you are and I am the right kind of me.

rightkindofme is offline  
#47 of 48 Old 10-06-2012, 10:44 AM
 
zebra15's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: State of Confusion
Posts: 4,737
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 20 Post(s)

Since this is an active thread again I'm going to post my experience.  

 

I started my own HS group last year.  There was nothing in the area for DS.  I live in a LARGE city (in the top 10 US) and there are no groups here that DS and I fit into).  Last year I started a tween/teen group.  Non religous, all inclusive type thing.  I still managed to upset people.  I started the group for the kids, so the kids would have something to do 1x a month, at the coffee shoppe.  Come, dont come,  there are no fees, its just for the kids.  parents need to stay but its just kids getting together for a couple hrs and the parents at another table talking etc.  Some parents wanted MORE structure, other parents didn't want to stay.  One mom didn't like the day/time etc.  It was a friggin fiasco.   My kid did make some friends but by the spring we were down to 1-2 kids showing up.

 

Needless to say I'm not running a group this year and it's sad because I really think in a city of this size there needs to be something for tweens/teens.

 

DS decided to go full force into swim team this year.  He seems to love that and swim takes 3 nights a week plus meets are 1 weekend a month.  He is doing activities at the library 1-2x a month.

I guess we are not centered around HS.  HS is something we do, its not 100% who we are.  

 

It's been a long, difficult road to get here.  The younger years were painful.  We unschooled but with some structure.  So quasi unschool?  (I had a plan for math and DS always read).  I also had expectations for behavior.

 

We are not a religious household.  Ds and I have our share of issues.  His father isn't around.  That tends to scare off alot of HS people. I guess single mom's aren't allowed to HS??  I don't fit the mold of a typical SAHM mom.  People really need to get over themselves.


Mom to J and never-ending , 0/2014 items decluttered, 0/52 crafts crafts completed  crochetsmilie.gif homeschool.gif  reading.gif  modifiedartist.gif

Seeking zen in 2014.  Working on journaling and finding peace this year.  Spending my free time taking J to swimteam

zebra15 is online now  
#48 of 48 Old 10-06-2012, 06:15 PM - Thread Starter
 
umami_mommy's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: home is where the magic is
Posts: 4,983
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

wow this is old. our problem this year is all the kids who have gone to school!! 2 of my son's friends.... one started last year and one this year, and 2 of my daughter's friends too. it's a bummer and my kids feel sad a lot about it. 


"Someone I loved once gave me a box full of darkness. It took me years to understand that this, too, was a gift." -- Mary Olivercoolshine.gif

umami_mommy is offline  
Reply

User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off