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#1 of 70 Old 08-07-2013, 01:52 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Ok. I'm totally new here and probably being very ignorant (and definitely not taking the time to look this up), but can someone tell me what the difference is between homeschooling and unschooling? I don't want to form any preassumptions on what unschooling is....as the name itself seems to say something. Nevertheless, very curious and wondering where my kids will ''go to learn'' when they get ''of school age''.

Thanks in advance for the replies!

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#2 of 70 Old 08-07-2013, 02:03 PM
 
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http://www.holtgws.com/whatisunschoolin.html

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#3 of 70 Old 08-07-2013, 05:56 PM
 
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Learning through living and child driven choices.  In a nutshell.

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#4 of 70 Old 08-08-2013, 12:33 PM
 
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TBH, and I know this might veer a bit into radical unschooling, but to me its about not creating a separation between learning and life. Its about not seeing kids activity in terms of educational achievement. 

 

I do think its possible to take that approach, by the way, without actually being a radical unschooler. I'm nowadays happy really not to concern myself with whether my kids are learning, but I have a much more proactive approach when it comes to things like family life, and chores, and what have you. I don't have the same attitude to family and group living that I think a lot of RUers have-we tend more toward consensual living, but I also will pull rank if need be. 


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#5 of 70 Old 08-11-2013, 01:03 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Ok. This concept is completely new to me.

 

How do things happen then when the child turns for example 18?

Is unschooling going completely without public education? Or does everyone unschooling at some point in time enroll? What about college or university(education)? Obtaining a job to make a living?

 

I'm curious as to how you do it!?!

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#6 of 70 Old 08-11-2013, 01:27 PM
 
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I unschooled, but taught reading/spelling very well and basic math. I left the rest to the kids. My teens went to public school for 2 to 3 years of high school, and made the honor roll. My oldest just got a scholarship for a high gpa that is covering most of her college costs.

 

If I had it to do over, I would have been very proactive in encouraging them to learn on their own, having a schedule bc that's what they needed. They now complain that I never "taught them anything", when what I did was not be pushy. So I guess for mine it would have been best to not unschool, even though they have done well once they got to public school in high school. I still have a toddler left so with my experience I will figure out what to do with her later on.


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#7 of 70 Old 08-11-2013, 02:16 PM
 
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For us the philosophy of autonomous child-led learning (i.e. unschooling) has included the right of the children to make the choice to attend school when it suits them and serves their needs -- and as teens my kids have chosen to avail themselves of that opportunity to a greater or lesser extent. Whether my child "is unschooling" when sitting entirely by choice in a pre-calculus classroom at the local school is a semantic issue that's not worth fussing about for me. I don't tend to call that unschooling but I do think of my kids as born-and-bred unschoolers who have happened to attend school here and there when it serves their needs. 

 

Anyway, in our case during their teen years my kids have managed to cobble together enough "credits" through home-based learning, self-directed public school "courses" and in-class work that they qualified for a high school diploma through our local school. My eldest went off to her college of choice with no difficulty and is currently studying classical music performance on scholarship. But we discovered that she could have applied to the same program easily with nothing more than SATs, a strong audition and a portfolio, and she has friends who were accepted this way. Certainly all unschoolers do not necessarily enrol in school, though it seems to be quite common that they try out a bit of structured learning (community college, virtual school, part-time school or regular schooling) as teens. Often short-term. Sometimes not. 

 

About employability. My ds went to apply for jobs this summer. His CV had entry after entry of unschooled learning related to computer technology, digital media, travel, music production and performance, involvement in community organizations and so on. Those things are what put him ahead of other (entirely public-schooled) candidates and got him the job. My eldest dd filled her mid-teen years with violin-playing, travel for high-level music training, and part-time work (during "school hours") all of which went together to make her into an incredibly talented and employable young adult, something which differentiates her from a more typical high school grad. She too has had no trouble finding part-time and summer full-time work.

 

I think that for many organizations -- not necessarily the mega-corps with thousands of employees, but the smaller ones, and not necessarily all colleges but some of them -- a young adult with a high school diploma is not going to be considered nearly as readily as a young adult whose CV says "I have forged my own unique educational path: look at all the things I'm proficient at."

 

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#8 of 70 Old 09-03-2013, 07:56 PM
 
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I don't know much about unschooling, but what little I know, it sounds like it would have been something my older son (who has Asperger's) would have thrived in.  I've kept that thought in the back of my head in case any of my other children have the problems he had learning in a traditional environment.  My main question, though, is, how do you legally "get away with" not sending your child to private or public school and not homeschooling?


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#9 of 70 Old 09-03-2013, 08:59 PM
 
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I'm certainly not "getting away with" anything. Where I live children can be exempt from school attendance if they are receiving their education at home or elsewhere. Mine are. Becoming educated doesn't necessarily mean you have to be instructed. (Though of course many unschooled kids are instructed, when they request teaching. My kid is all signed up for gymnastics class, and an origami class, and violin lessons, and today she asked me to teach her to make wontons.)

 

Some jurisdictions ask that home-educated children be tested periodically to prove that they are "making progress commensurate with age and ability." My kids have done standardized testing and performed very well indeed. And really, even if they hadn't made the average scores for their age-grade that would be fine, because 50% of school kids by definition are in that below-average group.

 

Some jurisdictions ask that the home-educated children and their parents present a portfolio of work to be looked over by a qualified teacher. A portfolio does not have to consist of worksheets and graded exams. It can consist of photographs, audiovisual recordings, lists of activities, accomplishments and experiences. Unschooled kids learn and grow -- and even a teacher-evaluator can see that.

 

Some jurisdictions ask that home-educating parents submit a learning plan outlining what they expect their children to learn and what resources they expect to use. I have to do this every year. I just look on this as a set of predictions and goals that my kids largely enumerate themselves. If not everything is accomplished, that's fine -- because the same thing happens in school.

 

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#10 of 70 Old 09-03-2013, 11:19 PM
 
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Yeah it depends on your local laws.

 

In the UK, we just have to provide some kind of an education which is suitable for our actual kids. That is their "age and aptitude" and any additional needs. This means that its nearly unknown for a kid to be sent back to school based on not having received an education. Not only that but the burden of proof is on the authorities to show we are failing, not the other way round, so there is no requirement to document, record, or prove anything and mostly people don't bother. Obviously this is ridiculously unschooling friendly. Every so often a backbencher mounts a challenge and we have to write some letters. But I think it also tends to be reflected in the general attitude of HSers to education here. There's far more scope to see education as part of life, to not think in terms of history and PE but just learning. The great thing is that that translates to a general approach of not seeing kids as people in need of learning and adults as not.

 

So my answer would be that you need to check your state laws. My understanding is that people have found ways to workaround them to unschool in every state but its going to be harder in some than others.


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#11 of 70 Old 09-04-2013, 12:37 AM
 
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Sorry, to respond to Mommyemma's point up the thread re how do they get qualified. I'm going through this a bit now with my son, in terms of decisions about whether to send him to secondary school (junior high?). 

 

I think the thing to remember about HSing is that its extremely kid dependent. What education your kids get depends greatly on them. 

 

I am enormously pro unschooling. I was reading about it from when  was a teenager and used it as a way to deschool myself. BUT I don't know how confident I'd be about it if my kids weren't well directed themselves. Don't get me wrong, they are not up at 5 doing math. But they always have strong interests, they always have something to do.And these interests do translate into learning stuff.

 

My son has spent a summer sailing and skiing and knows an awful lot about both. Now if I were in an academic mindset, and I hate this things where people reduce kids learning to pigeonholes but....I could be talking physics, math, geography...yada yada. Like I say I am lucky to live in a country where that mindset isn't needed, which suits me well.

 

I actually don't know how, certainly my oldest and youngest, would fit in going to school as they are constantly busy. (my middle child usually has stuff she likes but she likes a bit of structure and talking. She's more a Project Based Homeschooling kind of kid, if you have heard of that, though that's not my approach with her).

 

I've just been getting ready for autumn, and for us, with kids aged 10, 8 and 5, that means making sure we have organised art supplies, electronics supplies, music books, kid books and games, that the kitchen and garden have tools at kid height and stuff is reasonably easy to find, that we have as smooth a passage out of the house as possible. Next week we will probably sit down and have a chat to see if anyone wants anything specific ordered. My youngest loves gardening and I've been collecting plants over the summer for us to sort the garden out a bit, as well as , of course, putting the allotment to bed for the winter, putting in fruit trees etc. So that's the kind of thing we do now and it is quite busy. But in terms of equipping kids for life. I don't know. I know that they are as equipped as any other 10 or 8 year old I know. Right now they are well equipped. I think if they fell too far from the curve I might get a bit nervous. But the thing is, you can often catch up a little later anyway. A serious option for my kids is to take their exams -exams normally spread over 4 years-slightly late but all in one or two years. That's basically what I did, and what it means was an adolescence of doing what I wanted followed by a year of serious slog (I was also working two jobs though). 

 

What I do feel strongly about is looking at your actual kids. I really hope as a community we are beyond this thing of saying "you're not really an unschooler-you teach your kids astronomy.". Some people call themselves users but teach the basics. If that is the best thing for your kids, or if if is the best thing for you-if you can't let go of their education more than that, quite possibly entirely reasonably-then kudos for doing exactly what you are doing. To unschool for everything except math is still an amazing, trailblazing thing to do in the context of wider society.


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#12 of 70 Old 09-04-2013, 09:14 AM
 
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Originally Posted by kblackstone444 View Post
 

I don't know much about unschooling, but what little I know, it sounds like it would have been something my older son (who has Asperger's) would have thrived in.  I've kept that thought in the back of my head in case any of my other children have the problems he had learning in a traditional environment.  My main question, though, is, how do you legally "get away with" not sending your child to private or public school and not homeschooling?

Do you mean "homeschooling", like scheduling desk time and having parents fill the roll of a school teacher?  Or do you mean "homeschooling" that kids are (in whatever way) learning?  Our state require that 11 essential subject areas are "covered".  The regulations also state that homeschooling is understood to be more experiential than traditional school, and that covering those areas does not have to be done with bookwork, done separately, or even done outside of everyday life.  So, when I take the time to record what is happening (our state also requires us to "keep records" but doesn't define that) I see that indeed my kids are covering all this, without "homeschooling" by the first definition, but we are most certainly "homeschooling" by the second.  I am even in the midst of giving 8.5yo dd1 her first assessment test, also required in this state (but for the parents' records only).  DD2 does not need to take this test because she is not 8yo yet, and not registered yet, but that is also part of the regulations, and we are "getting away with" nothing there, either.

 

If you are interested in how MA unschoolers "get away with" :p unschooling, check out the regs online.

 

So, that covers the legal side of things.  Some states like PA make it trickier but not impossible to unschool your kids (meaning, fitting the unschooling experience into the legal requirements, not to mean choosing the life of a scofflaw over what is expected), but few unschoolers are "getting away with" anything.  I do know a couple of families and OF a couple more that have never registered their kids in school and I guess you could say they are indeed getting away with that, but as far as their kids are concerned, they are far from the uncultured hooligans society might expect from kids who live in a bus and are never sat down to be taught anything.  

 

On the home front, I've discovered that my girls simply don't need imposed instruction to learn, either.  They are energetic, curious and bright.  Both have taught themselves to read, with plenty of help because they don't hesitate to ask for it (and don't hesitate to say "stop!  let me figure this one out myself!")  I have no trouble fitting our unschooling experience into what WA state expects of me--no trouble at all.


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#13 of 70 Old 09-06-2013, 10:04 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SweetSilver View PostSo, that covers the legal side of things.  Some states like PA make it trickier but not impossible to unschool your kids (meaning, fitting the unschooling experience into the legal requirements, not to mean choosing the life of a scofflaw over what is expected), but few unschoolers are "getting away with" anything.  

Right, unschooling IS homeschooling. Unschoolers aren't "getting away" with anything. They still fulfill the legal requirements of their state. We're unschooling in Pennsylvania, obeying all the laws, including keeping a portfolio, being evaluated, and taking standardized tests with no trouble.

 

It does help if the parent is observant and able to understand when and what the child is learning. Unschooling parents tend to be very involved and aware of their children's activities. They understand when their children are learning things in untraditional ways. This makes keeping a portfolio easy since you needn't limit the content to worksheets from a specific curriculum. I can use the journal my son kept of our summer trip. I can use all the math questions he develops to solve problems in his computer games. 


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#14 of 70 Old 09-06-2013, 12:03 PM
 
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What about GPA? How do kids go to college with no grades to speak of or no real history of a GPA?


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#15 of 70 Old 09-06-2013, 12:27 PM
 
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College isn't everyone's goal. But some people take community college classes starting at 16 and then go on to a 4 year college after that. Some people take the GED. Some people have parent issued diplomas. Some participate in accredited diploma programs. And there are accredited high schools and colleges that don't give grades to their students. Grades aren't the only way for a college to assess a potential student.  


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#16 of 70 Old 09-06-2013, 01:36 PM
 
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There are plenty of ways into college. A GPA from a bricks-and-mortar high school is only one way. Here's one of several past threads on this board about the issue. When I wrote in that thread my experience shepherding kids through college admissions was still theoretical. My dd is now in her 2nd year of college. She went to high school full-time for one year, part time for bits of two other years, and unschooled under an umbrella school arrangement for her fourth year. She had no trouble getting admitted, and got lots of scholarship money. High schools probably don't bend over backwards to inform their students of all the other ways to get into college, but they're out there.

 

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#17 of 70 Old 10-25-2013, 02:50 AM
 
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I think the term 'unschooling' refers to the "school of Hard knocks". which is to say the school of life where you learn by interaction with others in both conflict and cooperation. This is different to home schooling where a mother ( generally) becomes the teacher on the day by day basis. To do this most times permit is needed from state authorities to do this. Some people once they have basic reading skills can almost educate themselves -this has been proven a number of times with individuals who simply used libaries without any assistance to search out what they felt to be important however this is a rarity and depends on a good IQ to self educate in this way


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#18 of 70 Old 10-25-2013, 03:56 AM
 
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I've already shared some about this on some other threads -- for example, I just recently shared about my record keeping in the thread on the easiest state to unschool in -- but I thought I'd mention in here that my completely unschooled 13-year-old dd has just started 8th grade in public school because of her desire for this experience.

 

She expressed the desire to do this right before school started last fall, and I expressed concern about the fact that she'd had very little interest in reading up to that point. She did enjoy listening to books, whether being read to by me or listening to audio books, so her vocabulary was huge, and she did by that point recognize many words because the computer games she likes require some reading, but when it came to just opening up a book and reading even one sentence, she would have to slowly sound out many of the words and it would take her forever to make her way down the page.

 

I told her that I knew reading would get easier for her if she'd spend some time actually reading a book every day, and I suggested that she spend the next year getting really comfortable with reading, because in school, she'd be expected to do a lot of it. She said that so long as she knew she could go the following fall, this would give her a goal to work toward. And she started checking out books from the library and working her way through them, and it just got easier and easier. She also got really into exploring the Internet that year, discovering new music and interesting Vlogs on YouTube, and then in April she turned 13 and was able to get a Facebook account, and started chatting a lot with friends online. And she started writing a novel, too. Reading and writing became more like breathing for her.

 

She and I also did a little math work at Khan Academy, and she watched some science videos there on her own.

 

Then she started the 8th grade with her age group in mid-August, and she's doing quite well, and is really enjoying herself for the most part. Language Arts is one of her favorite subjects, and this particular teacher had wonderful things to say at parent-teacher conferences last week. She said dd is a role model for the other kids -- that she's very hardworking and independent, and is also helping another student who's having some trouble in the class, and is really fitting right in both socially and academically.

 

All of this just is just reinforcement for me that unschooling is totally awesome preparation for whatever kids want to do in life. If they at some point choose a structured learning environment, they'll be highly motivated and will stand out because they are really where they want to be and every day is a true choice for them.

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#19 of 70 Old 11-02-2013, 04:54 AM
 
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When we lived in Georgia, the only state requirement was that I turn in a monthly attendance chart.  Does everyone notice how ridiculous this is? I mean, how exactly would you go about NOT attending in an unschooling family? headscratch.gif


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#20 of 70 Old 11-03-2013, 05:47 PM
 
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Yeah, it's pretty silly trying to have unschooling fit a school model:-) We have to keep attendance in our state, too.


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#21 of 70 Old 11-03-2013, 08:04 PM
 
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In answer to the original question:

 

Think of a child's first 2 or 3 years of life. In that brief time, they learned to walk, talk, and interact with their world in a myriad of ways. No one ever "taught" them. Structured curriculum was not necessary. They learned by observation, trial and error, practice, and a thousand other ways. The parents' role is to model what is possible, provide a safe environment and opportunities, and let the child get on with what comes naturally. Nothing needs to change at some arbitrary age, or for certain kinds of subjects.

 

Walking and talking are arguably far more complex and difficult than reading, math, or any of the academic subjects. My children, now 17 & 18, are interested in their world, and their education reflects that. BigGirl is less interested in physics than YoungSon, but she knows more about international affairs than he does. Both of them are articulate and generally use proper grammar, although neither of them were ever corrected or "taught" vocabulary.

 

This is what radical unschooling is for me - a continuation of the natural style of learning each child was born into. Our home is full of books, and we love museums, so we still regularly visit them. But we see it more as recreational than intentionally educational. We have craft supplies around because we like being creative, not for "art class". The Dumplings are nearly grown, and ready to go out on their own soon. But I am confident they will both continue to learn all their lives - through reading, museums, whatever life courses they choose, whether they include college as part of that or not.

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#22 of 70 Old 11-04-2013, 01:11 AM
 
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Attendance for unschoolers? Love it. 

 

We don't have any requirements at all really. We have to provide a "suitable and efficient full time education according to the age and aptitude of the child" (I'm misquoting off the top of my head but that's the gist). That has been established to cover unschooling very well. But the best bit is that the legal onus is not on us to demonstrate that we are providing that education but for the state to show, beyond reasonable doubt, that we are not. I'm not sure how the law could be worded better for our purposes.


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#23 of 70 Old 11-04-2013, 04:33 AM - Thread Starter
 
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HA HA Thats pretty good:) Let's go on vacation, attendance can still be taken:)

 

Thanks for all the replies. It really made clear the matter. Can anyone tell me more specifically then how you start? If you dont send your kids to school, dont have any school material to teach, but rather let the kids learn while they live.......is your day then just getting up and going about your every day routine, finding something to do? Or do you actually plan or intentionally engage yourself/child into doing something that ''helps'' them along? It was mentioned about gardening, which I see as an excellent way to ''teach'' kids unintentionally(assuming its your lifestyle-its also good otherwise too of course, but then it wouldnt be unintentional:)!!)

 

More people in the states have their own houses and most likely some sort of yard compared to where I'm living, in Finland, where it seems like more than half the population is living in apartment buildings or attached(is the right term detached?) houses. So living closer to the earth here is a bit more tricky than for most Americans, I feel.

 

Anyhow, was that sort of off-topic. I'm getting distracted having kids playing with some homemade playdough right beside me. Looking forward to some different ideas some of you have had when your kids were still little(5-10?).

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#24 of 70 Old 11-04-2013, 07:12 AM
 
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There is nothing in any description of unschooling that says that parents can't do some planning, suggesting, etc.  Life is full of wonderful opportunities.  Be enthusiastic, but take their lead.  What you plan can be based on their interests, extensions of their interests, or something that just looks really, really cool to you.  

 

(Though, full disclosure, with more than one kid, and with serious stubbornness issues, I have been known to occasionally demand we step out of the house, but that's one of those ongoing unschooling debates.  I don't demand, however, that they read a particular book or read at all, etc.)

 

Planning can be based off what they "need", but I would caution that that path could wind up with expectations on your part.  I also think that our assessments on "needs" can be colored by our school experiences, which might have no bearing on the progression of skills for an individual.  But that doesn't mean you can't bring things home for what you perceive as needs.  I brought home wooden pattern blocks, because I think it's nice if kids can understand the qualities and relationships of shapes and between different shapes--OK, because I think they "need" it, and they are pretty and make fun pictures.  I could have decided that they "need" to know the names of the shapes, which is what is emphasized in early education more than playing with the shapes.  In either case, they had fun with these and other things I've brought home.  There is no expectation, no strings.  They don't need to play with them, nor have particular outcomes from playing with them.  

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#25 of 70 Old 11-04-2013, 08:10 AM
 
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Over years of unschooling, I cannot really say I have never taught my kids anything. I am 40 years older than them, and have much more experience and information about the world bouncing around in my head. And sometimes, it has been more my interests than theirs. I am quite obsessed with (my own) learning about microbiology, among other fields. When I read a new book, I get excited about some facet I have just learned, and want to share. I "impose" this on the kids, not because I think they need to know it, but because I am genuinely excited. I try to stop when their eyes glaze over (not always successfully!). They probably know much more about science than the average American, but the more important thing they have learned is that learning itself is exciting. They would probably not learned this from a class on microbiology.

 

This pattern has been our norm all their lives. When we lived in The South, I enjoyed driving to Civil War battlefields, and learning about US history that way. Driving there and back, I rambled on about what I know about the social and economic situations that brought about the war, and the process of recovery after. The Dumplings were 7 & 8 at the time, but could intelligently discuss Reconstruction.

 

We have lived in Mexico (learned some Spanish, and an understanding of that culture and history), on a small farm (gardening basics, raising chickens, environmental lessons), and in a pretty rough urban neighborhood (issues of poverty, race relations, political action). None of this was "intentional" in the sense of creating experiences for the purpose of teaching a lesson. But life is so filled with lessons - how could they not learn?


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#26 of 70 Old 11-04-2013, 08:34 AM
 
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The principle I cling to is "no uninvited teaching." So it's not that my kids don't learn from me. It's not that I don't teach them. It's just that unless they implicitly or explicitly say they want specific teaching, I don't go forth with it.

 

There's a lot of natural sharing of knowledge and skills that goes on amongst friends and family that isn't intentional teaching, and that certainly happens with my unschoolers. If I'm enthusiastic about something I've discovered, I'll share it with my kids just the way I'd share it with a close friend. ("That reminds me of a podcast I heard where they were talking about this really cool effect where ....") If I see or hear about something that I'm pretty sure would interest them, I'll suggest it, just the way I would with a friend. ("Hey, did you notice there's a cheese-making workshop happening at the community centre last weekend in November?") If I see something that I think they might enjoy, I might bring it home and offer it, just like I would with dh. ("Oh, I found this blacksmithing book at the thrift store and thought you might like it.") And if I'm asked for help learning something, I'll certainly respond, just as I would with a friend who, say, said she really wanted to know how to read lace-knitting patterns so she could knit scarves like mine. And since I'm the person who can access money and transportation for procuring resources, if my kids ask for something structured to help them learn something specific, I'll get involved in helping them get something appropriate, and if they want, I'll help keep them accountable just like I would if dh asked me to hold him accountable on his exercise plan or something -- reminding, asking about progress, cheering him on. 

 

This all sort of evolves over the years as you naturally live your lives and your kids get older. I don't think there's any real need to work out in your head exactly what role you'll take in any given situation. Unschooling doesn't "start," it just naturally evolves out of parenting toddlers and preschoolers without suddenly deciding at a certain age that you'll be imposing other-directed teaching. The answers work themselves out. No uninvited teaching. Just respond to your child's questions, interests, needs and requests.

 

Miranda 


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#27 of 70 Old 11-04-2013, 09:03 AM
 
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And have fun.  Be curious.  Explore.  Don't be shy about the limits of your knowledge and skill.  Learn more.  Be awed by the world.  Yourself.  You.  Not just so your kids can follow.  But I can almost guarantee that the attitude is contagious, even if the specific paths aren't the same.


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#28 of 70 Old 11-05-2013, 01:24 AM
 
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I think "no uninvited teaching" is a great way to put it. 

 

One approach I come across from time to time is the "autonomous" one. Now that's an evolving term, I think. In the UK, what we called "autonomous" used to be basically what you guys called "unschooling", I think-except we never had different flavours of "autonomous". So autonomous was not incompatible with using textbooks, though at the same time I'd say it was rare (we also, I think, tend to have a default assumption in the HS community here of unschooling as the default unless you are hsing for religious reasons). 

 

But now I'm increasingly coming across "autonomous" as synonymous with actually no teaching at all by anyone, with the idea that everything has to be self taught (which makes perfect linguistic sense). Its not something we'd ever do-it seems far too rigid for my family, and counter to my personal unschooling philosophy for me to refuse to teach a kid asking for help-but I'm intrigued by the thinking behind it, and especially coming from families who, at first glance, seem to be absolute unschoolers regarding their kids' education.


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#29 of 70 Old 11-06-2013, 03:48 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Wow! I can see how my life has been lived inside a box! Reading these responses has opened up another realm for me! Amazing. It's so sad how it affects and what it effects when you're caught along in the mainstream. It's also sad how social media has such a strong influence on what paths mainstream takes.This way of life seems pretty practical and quite right. But seeing how easily I am influenced...I still have questions smile.gif How have you come to put yourself in such a heavy place of responsibility? I understand the reasons for homeschooling/unschooling, like having your own schedule and doing things your own way, tailoring to your kids interests, the list goes on. Homeschooling is maybe a bit different (?) where you actually teach the kids, have lessons, give regular tests, etc. But with unschooling, the fact that you go withthe flow, how your life with your kids evolves and goes forward, not teaching because you have to....how do you take that responsibility on yourselves when what you are literally doing is preparing them for life!! I admire the strength some habe to do so. I am interested in what kind of "journeys/paths" you have followed. I also understand the thought maybe because I feel strongly myself, that I would trust more in what I "teach" my kids than the mainstream going to school idea. (my mother tongue is english, but living here for 6yrs has really taken its toll:) I'm having trouble finding words and then organising them well enough to get my point across! Maybe its understandable, but I feel myself I cant get it said well enough!) Yeah, sending your kids to school is switching or giving responsibility to someone else to "raise" your child. And, have any of you had "hairy, going crazy" times with USing? smile.gif had to ask:)
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#30 of 70 Old 11-06-2013, 09:17 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mommyemma View Post

And, have any of you had "hairy, going crazy" times with USing? smile.gif had to ask:)

Lots, but less to do with unschooling specifically and more to do with family dynamics and the fact that I am seemingly connected at the hip with these kids 24/7.  

 

AACK!  hammer.gif

 

I think the fact that we unschool actually gives me some spaciousness with this.  But no, so far no "going crazy" times that could be directly attributed to unschooling.  Parenting styles can be an extension of unschooling (or vice versa), true, which can muddy things up some, but still, I can't think of any of our...ahem!..."challenges".... I can blame USing.


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