March 2017 Unschooling Thread - Mothering Forums

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#1 of 37 Old 03-01-2017, 10:09 AM - Thread Starter
 
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March 2017 Unschooling Thread

A few questions to get things started:

Do you make an effort to address / nurture growth / encourage your children in areas that are not their natural inclination, or do you tend to focus on areas of strength on the assumption that the rest will get dragged along? Has this changed over time, or is it different for your different children?

And ... are you seeing spring yet where you live? Got any plans for spring?

Miranda

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#2 of 37 Old 03-01-2017, 10:45 AM
 
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We are well into spring. We have 'spring training' (baseball) all over the place here. Today is 'cold' meaning 60's but by the weekend temps will be into the 80's.

Today I am busy doing some paperwork, boxing things up for mailing this weekend and trying my best to finish a blanket to send off with those packages.

This month starts the crazy holidays (busier than xmas) with b'days, holidays, and such things from mid-march until june. It seems like every couple weeks there is something. Thank goodness for flatrate boxes and print at home postage! Along with amazon.

We are enjoying the weather. Spring is much better than fall- Fall is just hot and yucky and summer never ends. Spring still holds the cold of the winter.

I may plan a field trip or 2- regardless of what kiddo wants to head north for a day trip.

I learned long ago trying to force, entertain, enrich areas of kiddo that seem to be lacking only are met with resistance and he will go at his own pace. The kid who refused to write and then realized he needed to learn cursive for university willingly took OT classes over the summer so he could do uni. The kid who refused formal swim classes but realized he wanted swim team at age 10. So learn to swim was full on at that point. I don't push it, I will make it available and eventually kid comes around.

Now that he is older, working and has a 'plan' going for classes and transfer.. I'm not as 'dumb' as I once was LOL.
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#3 of 37 Old 03-01-2017, 12:39 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Snowing here today, though somebody said they saw a couple of geese flying north this morning. Perhaps the geese know something I don't. We had lot of snow in the middle of February, then a huge melt, so there's only 2-3 feet on the ground now. Hoping to get a couple more weeks of good skiing in.

We don't do birthdays in a major way ... normally just small gifts between immediate family if still residing at home. Fiona didn't even want that this year, so we just had a nice dinner to celebrate. Although I did take the excuse to buy her some new socks which she desperately needed.

I am mostly of the opinion that when it comes to skills and knowledge, weaker areas will eventually get dragged along by stronger ones without the need for educational engineering.

On the other hand in the more big-picture sense I have definitely tried to pay attention to neglected areas and try things to prevent my kids from being too uneven for too long. I'm referring here not to particular skills but to general balance in my kids' lives. So, if I saw that most of what my kid gravitated to was sedentary activities, I might look for opportunities to hook them into something more active that was related to their interests. Or if I saw that another kid was spending a ton of time on facts and academic skills, I might try to hook them on something more creative and open-ended, again probably using their primary interests as a pathway towards that. And a kid who was spending most of his time on solitary stuff, I'd see if there was a way to connect him socially with others who shared his interests.

I do this because temperamentally my kids are the type who tend to get into ruts. They focus on one thing to the exclusion of all else for long periods of time, and then resist change even when that obsession is no longer making them happy. At various times they've seemed to need nudges to get unstuck.

Miranda

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#4 of 37 Old 03-01-2017, 05:32 PM
 
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#5 of 37 Old 03-03-2017, 06:25 PM
 
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Ladies! I am having a real problem with finding things for my 11yr. I not sure where he fits in? Help! My DH thinks that Public school will help...To me this will only hurt him. Mostly because I think that he will see it as a kind of rejection. Does anyone one have some words of wisdom? Please I am feeling like a bad mom right now...
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#6 of 37 Old 03-03-2017, 11:21 PM - Thread Starter
 
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This is such a tough age. The little-kid stuff is no longer entirely fulfilling, the homeschool demographic starts to shrink as older kids decide to try school, social connections start to become more important but are harder to find, you haven't necessarily found passions you want to delve deeply into but the superficial introductory experiences are not challenging enough, and yet you're not old enough to participate in community-based work/volunteering/mentoring that might light a fire.

I'd look into volunteering anyway. People may tell you he's too young, but I've found that if you offer to come with a pre-teen a few times, sometimes they'll give it a chance, and when they see your kid in action their reservations disappear. Doing real work alongside adults in the community can be a really transformative experience for a pre-teen. Adult mentors can fill a lot of social and relationship needs for kids. The social life they're craving doesn't necessarily have to be primarily with agemates. Food bank, SPCA, watershed cleanup, sorting books at the library, even hanging out with younger children as a mother's helper, filling water cups at an aid station for a charity 5k run.

I'd look into non-homeschooling activities. Our homeschooling community never numbered more than about 10 kids so my kids always did activities that fell in the after-school hours and included lots of school kids: choir, aikido, violin, dance, gymnastics. Activities that kept a stable group from season to season and year to year were best because there was more commitment, which meant a real shared interest, and more chance to build friendships over the long-term.

Not sure if it's a possibility for you, but travel adventures were spectacularly good for my kids. My kids were older (14-15) and their destinations involved a lot of courage and independence. But if we'd had the right relatives available closer to home, I would gladly have put them on a bus or a direct flight at age 11 to visit a grandparent or a favourite aunt for a week or two.

I have always been really open with my kids when I felt I was struggling to meet their needs. We would talk about the fall-off in homeschooling numbers throughout middle school, and the limitations of available activities in our area. We'd discuss the fact that society doesn't value the contributions that young people can make, and doesn't make it easy for them to get involved in contributing. We'd talk about the lack of challenge and depth in available activities, and I would empathize with them over all these issues. We would brainstorm ideas, share our dreams for ideal solutions, commiserate over frustrations. Anytime we talked about school (because I considered it very much on the table as a choice for them by that age) they understood that it wasn't about rejection, it was just a possibility for them to consider as a way to meet some of their needs.

That being said, this is often a tough time of year for homeschooling families. Sometimes all that's needed is a turning of the seasons, longer days, more sunshine, and everything gets reframed in a more positive light.

Miranda
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#7 of 37 Old 03-03-2017, 11:26 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Oh... and income-generating projects ... dog-walking, snow-shovelling, lawn-mowing, flyer routes, plant-watering for people on holidays, a small business selling something he makes... sometimes that can give some focus and challenge, even if a fair bit of parent facilitation is required.

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#8 of 37 Old 03-04-2017, 10:22 AM
 
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Rather than signs of spring, we just made a rapid transition from summer to winter, coming from a month in Baja to icy snowy home at 15 degrees (-9.5C). But we don't really expect any spring for a month or so at least.

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Originally Posted by moominmamma View Post
A few questions to get things started:

Do you make an effort to address / nurture growth / encourage your children in areas that are not their natural inclination, or do you tend to focus on areas of strength on the assumption that the rest will get dragged along? Has this changed over time, or is it different for your different children?

Miranda
What a good question! I struggle so much with this one, all the time, and am never sure I'm doing it right.

My 6yo: Mostly, she is easy. Flexibility is one of her natural strengths. She's social, a joiner, moderately curious about everything. Academically, she probably has given herself skills a little bit higher than "grade level" for most things, and I'm not sure I'd really count any of them as deep strengths or weaknesses.

The one difficulty of hers I do address is physical caution and fear. She's hesitant about things like swimming and skiing and scrambling, which is fine, but doing outdoor stuff is an important part of what our family does together, and she really wants to join in, so I spend more time trying to gently get her more comfortable. Mostly, that works well.

My 8yo: He is an incredibly spiky, totally unrounded kid, with amazing strengths, but also huge weaknesses in things that are pretty important. He's imaginative and a deep thinker, with an amazing conceptual grasp of science, a steel trap mind for interesting facts that he is good at making connections between, an intuitive grasp of math way beyond grade level with no on-paper work in his life, logic and strategy good enough to play geeky adult board games with geeky adults. But he can't read, struggles with emotional regulation, compromise, and kindness, can tantrum like a much younger kid, doesn't socialize with most other kids, and categorically dislikes and usually won't engage with huge swaths of important human culture (fiction and music).

I bounce back and forth between ignoring the weaknesses and trying to work on them. On one hand, I don't have much faith that his strengths will drag his weaknesses along (How would a good understanding of neurotoxic venoms and exponents help a kid with appropriate social behavior?). On the other hand, I can't turn him into something he's not, and don't want him to feel like we're trying to. We have come to a reasonably good mutual understanding about working on reading together in a more formal way -- he thinks it's necessary, though he doesn't like it, and he actually prefers formal reading lessons because they're predictable and sequential, and aren't packed with frustrating long or non-phonetic words like real books. I think in the past, his deep desire for information might have dragged reading skills along, but YouTube is a far better source than any book written for an elementary-school reading level. The social/emotional stuff is a thornier question that I really don't know what to do with.
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#9 of 37 Old 03-05-2017, 05:22 PM
 
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Thanks Miranda!
He visited a group tonight not homeschool. I think that he liked it. I see one challenge. He is around so many younger kids that I feel like he is having a hard time fitting in with the older kids. I am hoping that is will pass? I am really hoping this is all in my mind. Maybe?

We will keep going to this group as long as N is happy. So, at least we found something. Also, I am going to talk to him about other things he might like.
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#10 of 37 Old 03-05-2017, 07:27 PM
 
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Zela called first me for Facebook chat tonight, about plans for after graduation, now talking with husband:

Zela" I should have practiced".
h: "I should have too."

...then she launched into a story, was playing piano in a room at school with a bunch of people milling around and she was practicing some Chopin nocturnes she's "chipping away at", and a music prof came by and said, "Why haven't I seen you in any music classes?" and then came back later and said "I have some questions for you...why is it that we get students in our classes who can't really play, and then we have students at your level who aren't in classes?", etc. and Zela said, there was no music program when she went to school (also no time!)...then she started laughing (to h) and said..."but I CAN'T really play...but I would love to play the (Bach) Little Fugue. It's only four minutes long".

So, yeah, her first choice of career (jazz sax player) probably wasn't that far off course.

But now she's a painter with Minimalist inspiration, planning on filling the attic of our house in Maine with her paintings. So I guess we can't sell it yet...

Deborah
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Yana's dogs are here, bounding around in the gravel in the "dog yard". Husband playing Bach verrrrrrrry slowly in the sun room. We noticed today that it is getting less sun in it as the sun goes north and higher, wow, almost the equinox. House is 66F this morning, actually quite pleasant in a non-drafty house! (Soon we will be closing the eastern blinds to keep heat out!)

Today, for our sanity, husband and I are going on a one day news fast. That means no political groups on Facebook, no new sites. I accidentally found what the EPA (where my SIL works) is being subjected to (total lockdown of information, no sharing or updating) and that was enough to keep me angry and frustrated all day. (Well, I hope not. But it did convince me that for at least this one day, locking out the outside world will not be a bad thing.)

husband saying..."Hm...I can just hear Itzak saying "you must practice slooowly"...he's all cheerful. He asked if I broke my news fast. I said, only by accident!

Zela is interested in doing an art internship in the town where she grew up, either at a museum, or at a sort of community art collective (I think that's what it is) and we talked last night (amongst zillions of things) if one should go back to where one grew up (right out of college at least) and having to uproot again when she goes to graduate school (having spent a peripatetic youth, living in Maine twice a year for up to a quarter of a year per year after our move southwest, our unschooling thing carried to its logical conclusion)...so she's also thinking about at least applying to graduate school now, although at this time there are no funds available from the parents; Yana is starting the process of getting ready to apply to school and even if it takes a couple of years to get there, yikes...

Deborah
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#12 of 37 Old 03-06-2017, 09:28 AM
 
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"1) Do you make an effort to address / nurture growth / encourage your children in areas that are not their natural inclination, or do you tend to focus on areas of strength on the assumption that the rest will get dragged along? Has this changed over time, or is it different for your different children?

And ... 2) are you seeing spring yet where you live? Got any plans for spring?"

February was like a different month entirely, like April maybe? Hoping we get spring rains. Spring plans? Someone should go to Zela's graduation. I've never even visited her at college, although she's taken me on a virtual tour of the building a couple of times, and her apartment, and her studio. Husband will probably go. I would like to, but there's this Lack of Funds thing.

1) I get more and more Radical Unschooling on this. I even do it with my violin studio. Amazing, how the desire for structure & mastery varies from child to child. Last week a ten year old played a first approximation of a piece I'd given her a couple of weeks before; I thought with a few more weeks of work it'd be pretty good, satisfying to play for family and friends, maybe even with a friend. But she was ready to go on, asked me very seriously "Were there any errors?" (there were no actual errors in intonation, rhythm, or pacing) and I thought, for this child at this time, not moving to a different piece will indicate (to her) failure...so we went on. (It's coming back, haha, when she has a joint lesson with a friend!) (I know I'm sidling away from the question and could actually carry on and get more and more off the subject for thousands of words, so I'll stop now.)

...except to nutshell it this way: I think, given a sufficiently enriched environment and opportunities, additional nudging of the child is seldom necessary. I think the ADULT should model the pursuit of knowledge, mastery, social interactions, etc.

Deborah
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#13 of 37 Old 03-06-2017, 12:28 PM
 
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On the other hand in the more big-picture sense I have definitely tried to pay attention to neglected areas and try things to prevent my kids from being too uneven for too long. I'm referring here not to particular skills but to general balance in my kids' lives. So, if I saw that most of what my kid gravitated to was sedentary activities, I might look for opportunities to hook them into something more active that was related to their interests. Or if I saw that another kid was spending a ton of time on facts and academic skills, I might try to hook them on something more creative and open-ended, again probably using their primary interests as a pathway towards that. And a kid who was spending most of his time on solitary stuff, I'd see if there was a way to connect him socially with others who shared his interests.

I do this because temperamentally my kids are the type who tend to get into ruts. They focus on one thing to the exclusion of all else for long periods of time, and then resist change even when that obsession is no longer making them happy. At various times they've seemed to need nudges to get unstuck.

Miranda
I hope it's okay to jump into the discussion when I'm new here and still have three kids ages 5 & under! It's really helpful to me to read everyones comments as I try to figure out what homeschooling/unschooling way to go. My oldest loves writing - she'll write pretend things but also asks a few times to week how to spell things (the other day it was "flower" and "leaf") - but she doesn't like any sort of workbook thing or review, in spite of thinking playing school is the best thing ever. So i'm starting to lean toward the unschooling side of learning as i realize she, at least, probably does better this way.

On the other hand, I really like what Miranda said about sometimes giving them a nudge to get unstuck. My husband probably would have benefited from unschooling, but at the same time I see how his tendency to be obsessed with a new thing, learn a ton about it, and then move on tends to lead to piles of collected stuff.

Yesterday was SO beautiful; today it snowed but at least is melting quickly!
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#14 of 37 Old 03-06-2017, 05:15 PM
 
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Welcome @aleighhart
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#15 of 37 Old 03-06-2017, 08:48 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Of course it's okay to jump in aleighhart! Better than okay! Welcome!

Further to the above discussion I should clarify that when I said I nudge when my kids seem 'stuck,' I meant something more than "failing to progress according to external measures." I meant frustrated and unhappy, and unable break out of whatever rut they're in.... while wishing they could.

Miranda
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#16 of 37 Old 03-07-2017, 09:06 AM
 
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Yes, welcome! My kids were that little not too long ago, and you're encouraged to discuss no matter what age they are.

I guess I should also clarify that most of my "working on" weaknesses with them is things like when my daughter freaks out a bit at a certain ski run, I make sure she gets a chance to go again a few days later, with just me, so she can tackle it again with a new comfort level and feel successful. Or that when the adults break the rules they'd set out about whose turn it is to hit the pinata at a birthday right before my son's turn, and he actually doesn't freak out -- just calmly tries to correct them -- then I make sure to point out that success when I talk with him later.
Mostly just paying extra attention when they do something I know is hard for them, and trying to be patient when they don't.
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#17 of 37 Old 03-07-2017, 05:23 PM
 
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Well dang- we went to register kid for summer and fall terms at university.. NOW i come to find out he was WAS eligible for honors scholarships- ugh. The time for applications has since passed. It needed to be done a year ago, someone dropped the ball, his GPA speaks for itself and his abilities. When he is ready to transfer to the 4 yr uni (we are staying at the 2 yr as along as possible $$ reasons) the 4 yr should be offering all types of scholarships, according to registration today. I certainly hope she is right. When the advisor realized kid was 16 and close to graduation she had more than a few questions... I simply said 'homeschooling works'.

He is taking Physics this summer, 2 math classes and computer next fall, that leaves one last math and one last science lab for spring 2018 then he can transfer to the 4 yr university. He will have 4 semesters there and then a Math degree. What does all this get us? Grad school at age 19/20.

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#18 of 37 Old 03-07-2017, 08:23 PM - Thread Starter
 
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He will have 4 semesters there and then a Math degree. What does all this get us? Grad school at age 19/20.
Curious what his plans are longer-term. Does he want to move out, work, travel? Or is he just focused on grad school at this point?

Maybe it's the result of living in a small town in a rural area (or of stifling parenting, lol!), but my kids have been very keen to experience independent life away from home as soon as they can, and to travel as much as possible. Not judging, I'm honestly just curious whether he has plans for anything other than ongoing college semesters.

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#19 of 37 Old 03-07-2017, 08:55 PM
 
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Curious what his plans are longer-term. Does he want to move out, work, travel? Or is he just focused on grad school at this point?

Maybe it's the result of living in a small town in a rural area (or of stifling parenting, lol!), but my kids have been very keen to experience independent life away from home as soon as they can, and to travel as much as possible. Not judging, I'm honestly just curious whether he has plans for anything other than ongoing college semesters.

Miranda

He isn't sure but right now he is highly driven by the potential of significant financial aid due to age and GPA. There was talk of possible med school at one point but since I'm in a Masters program to try to become a therapist and hes seen the work load (or lack thereof) that career path has peaked his interest. As his mom, I think he would do much better in med school with a psychatrity concentration but what do I know. He only got placed in a math major because he tested so high and he is good at it. Now he is sorta stuck with math until the end. Ya know how that goes?

He is still too young to travel or venture out on his own. We are still working toward driving. Fingers crossed it happens before summer is over. He is doing well with working on campus in the math lab.

I'm sure at some point he will move out... again, when you got it good, you dont rock the boat... lol.

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#20 of 37 Old 03-07-2017, 09:37 PM
 
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Thanks Miranda for your post'm really enjoying reading comments from all you, experienced unschoolers...
I'm very new to unschooling and this forum it is really a unique resource! Thanks.
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#21 of 37 Old 03-08-2017, 04:08 PM - Thread Starter
 
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He is still too young to travel or venture out on his own.
Agreed (though my kids would disagree, as this wasn't true for them, but they were fortunate to have some rather unconventional opportunities)... I was thinking more of your comment about grad school at 19.

Having done med school myself I would suggest that if he has any doubts about the path, he should steer clear until the doubts are resolved. It is so expensive (in terms of tuition, but also, even more so, there is so much deferment of earning potential involved in the 6-10 years of training) and it is such immersive identity-consuming training that it is really difficult to turn back part-way if you begin to feel it isn't the right choice for you.

********

Fiona is complaining of lack of challenge lately. Last semester's courses at school, combined with the adjustment to mainstream schooling, hit the sweet spot. Her second-semester courses are feeling too slow paced and she wishes she were learning more. Unfortunately dance and aerial silks are kind of the same way right now: her classes are being dragged down a bit by less committed, less capable students. I wish I had solutions to suggest to her, but I'm coming up empty. She doesn't really have extra time to devote to additional things; she's quite heavily committed and has found a good balance of down-time that is keeping her in a good place emotionally. The situation reminds me of the complaint my eldest had about preschool almost 20 years ago that helped set us on our unschooling journey: "School is okay but it takes up too much of my learning time." Haha.

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#22 of 37 Old 03-12-2017, 11:30 AM
 
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Imagine instead of having one or a few or a handful of kids -- you had 36 of them. How could they have a good educational experience?

Yesterday, my town had yet another emotional community meeting about the fate of our public school. We have 36 kids or so in the school, K-12, which means that there are only a couple teachers, and the high-school model of kids taking lots of different specialized courses means they do all of those on scripted computer programs. People are unhappy about this, and worried about shrinking enrollment, and are trying to scheme lots of bizarre and unworkable ways to double or triple the school population. I wonder why they think it is impossible for 36 kids to be educated.

I know this is tangential to this forum, but it always frustrates me, because I feel like all the town's energy is going towards wishing people like me put their kids in the school, even though it wouldn't make much difference. On the other hand, I have time and energy and various skills, and would be more than happy to volunteer with the kids in the school -- lots of people in my community have energy and so many interesting talents, and if we were tapped as mentors, there could easily be a passionate adult mentor for every student. Only if they were willing to look beyond the traditional model.
OK, rant over.

In my life, I just ordered us tickets to Peru for the beginning of October, which has inspired a greater commitment to learning Spanish -- I signed me and the kids up for some Skype lessons on italki. The trial lessons went well, and I'm hoping this will work better than us trying to learn on our own. Ski season is getting into full swing -- got out with the kids yesterday, and a quick run with a friend, and am planning ski camp (4 days or so winter camping and skiing with kids) for this coming week.
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#23 of 37 Old 03-12-2017, 11:56 AM
 
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36- kids I see a TON of options for independent study. Here 36 kids wont fill a classroom, most high schools have about 40 per ROOM so a grade with 3 kids.. omg the options are amazing. Cooperative learning between levels, individual projects, combined topics. But oh no.. i'm sure people are freaking out because 'rules, structure, etc'.

We are flying through march over here. Turned on the A/C this weekend. So it's officially Summer-time in our world. NASCAR season started a couple weeks ago and my Sundays are gone. Kiddo is elated.

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2017 the year of peace and tranquility.
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#24 of 37 Old 03-12-2017, 11:58 AM
 
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Originally Posted by mckittre View Post
Imagine instead of having one or a few or a handful of kids -- you had 36 of them. How could they have a good educational experience?

Yesterday, my town had yet another emotional community meeting about the fate of our public school. We have 36 kids or so in the school, K-12, which means that there are only a couple teachers, and the high-school model of kids taking lots of different specialized courses means they do all of those on scripted computer programs. People are unhappy about this, and worried about shrinking enrollment, and are trying to scheme lots of bizarre and unworkable ways to double or triple the school population. I wonder why they think it is impossible for 36 kids to be educated.

I know this is tangential to this forum, but it always frustrates me, because I feel like all the town's energy is going towards wishing people like me put their kids in the school, even though it wouldn't make much difference. On the other hand, I have time and energy and various skills, and would be more than happy to volunteer with the kids in the school -- lots of people in my community have energy and so many interesting talents, and if we were tapped as mentors, there could easily be a passionate adult mentor for every student. Only if they were willing to look beyond the traditional model.
OK, rant over.
We (kids & I) have been volunteering at a local aftercare program. I say give some time even if it is once a month.

People will always have something to say...I love to see the action Just my 2cents
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#25 of 37 Old 03-12-2017, 12:38 PM - Thread Starter
 
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a grade with 3 kids.. omg the options are amazing.
But remember that the teacher allocation is not based on grades, but on numbers. While I am sure that 38 Grade 3 students in a room is a massive challenge, a school of 3 kids per grade is not going to have 3 kids per classroom. Instead they'll have 18-20 kids in a classroom, but the developmental, academic and social needs will vary from ~age 5 and not really ready to be away to mom to age 11, reading YA novels and doing pre-algebra -- and everything in between.

My kids have attended schools of both types (although the 'small' school was 2.5 - 3 x bigger than the one mckittre is talking about, and therefore classrooms only spanned 2-5 grades). Teaching a classroom of 30-40 kids of roughly the same age and level is much simpler than the multi-grade classroom of half that number. It takes an incredibly gifted teacher -- and massive amounts of curricular flexibility -- to manage the latter.

Miranda

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#26 of 37 Old 03-13-2017, 06:32 PM
 
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and massive amounts of curricular flexibility -- to manage the latter.

Miranda
Having worked in a school system I can tell you this is a big one. We look at things different as homeschooler. We "think outside the box". Even the way that I look at things now v. then is different. I have come a long way in seeing how children learn. Yes, I always have seen learning the same. BUT being in complete control of my children education has made my philosophy even more clear.

The one room schoolhouse are few and far between.
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#27 of 37 Old 03-13-2017, 06:45 PM - Thread Starter
 
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In my province (BC, Canada) the school curriculum is going through a phase of increased flexibility. Rather than focusing on hundreds of specific grade-levelled Prescribed Learning Outcomes (eg. "counts by fives"), the curriculum is now transitioning to a focus on Core Competencies that are cross-curricular, things like communication, social responsibility, critical thinking. This means that if the stars align (school administration is supportive, the teacher is passionate and creative and parents are supportive), it will be increasingly possible to move beyond simplistic subject-lines, grade-levels and measurement approaches.

But to get mindsets to shift is a tall order. Everyone associated with schools should intern with an unschooling family for six months, what do you think?

Miranda

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#28 of 37 Old 03-14-2017, 05:26 AM
 
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Everyone associated with schools should intern with an unschooling family for six months, what do you think?

Miranda
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#29 of 37 Old 03-15-2017, 07:07 PM
 
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Spring break. No lessons, but I may be going to the dentist. Zela tossed off one paper and a botany midterm but is seriously dreading her art history thesis...had written three pages but her goal is another 8 by the end of this week. Yana asked (cautiously) how the hemming is going on the four curtains for the Humane Society. They are cut but not hemmed. (I have so many small projects I need to do; husband was whining this morning that his bow needs to be rehaired; I didn't say anything because I promised to do it MONTHS ago. But maybe today is the lucky day for the Humane Society...

I just keep thinking that if I do one thing at a time, everything will eventually get done. Like, if you do one extra task every day for a year, even taking some days off, that's over 300 tasks, right? At least I'm getting most of the basic ones done, like washing dishes and doing laundry, but with kids out of the house it's pretty minimal...I remember the days when our large washer did at least a load a day.

Husband went off on his motorcycle, finally warm enough to ride. And I get the car, just in case. A few students wanted lessons, but then I started thinking about whether I wanted to go to the dentist or hold off until I can tell if I really have a problem or just irritated a nerve when I started practicing viola again!

The trees in the back yard are blooming, including the one I thought was maybe a walnut. It isn't; what could it be? (We think the other trees in the back yard (normally invasives, but these can't go anywhere) were intended to draw pollinators for the orchard that used to be there, 2 vitex something-or-others and a Golden Rain Tree...they hum with bees for weeks.

Well, new cat food made for the cat that needs liquid food, dishes half washed, laundry in...too bad those don't go on the list of 300 tasks!

Deborah
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#30 of 37 Old 03-16-2017, 06:11 PM
 
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L (almost 5) asked me out of the clear blue to make a letter book. I'm really not sure where she got the idea. So we went to the store and picked out a notebook.

N (11) is doing OK with his group. I am hoping that above everything else he can connect with someone and make a good friend. Hoping.

D (8) has picked up guitar. Just amazing.

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