A (stupid?) question about unschooling - Mothering Forums

Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
#1 of 7 Old 11-07-2004, 05:13 AM - Thread Starter
 
kaydee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Hither & Yon
Posts: 2,510
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I don't know much about unschooling, but am quite intrigued by the philosophy(ies).

I do have a ? for the unschooling parents here: where does college/university fit (or not view) into your view of formalized education? Do you see value in this level of educations? Or do you see the same problems there that lead you away from formalized education at younger ages? Do you think your unschooled children will want to go to college? And if so, do you think their being unschooled will make it more difficult for them?

TIA for taking the time to help me learn!
kaydee is offline  
#2 of 7 Old 11-07-2004, 06:14 AM
 
UnschoolnMa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Trying to release my cows..Join Me!
Posts: 15,152
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Kaydeesac wrote:
I don't know much about unschooling, but am quite intrigued by the philosophy(ies).

I do have a ? for the unschooling parents here: where does college/university fit (or not view) into your view of formalized education?

I think college is a great option, but it has to be the student's decision if they are going to get anything meaningful and lasting out of it.

Do you see value in this level of educations? Or do you see the same problems there that lead you away from formalized education at younger ages?

I definately see value in college and both hubby and I have expressed that to them. I don't see the issues in college that I have with the school system at younger ages. Actually the college environment lends itself very easily to unschooling IMO. Unschooling involves studying what intrigues you, and following the learning to get where you want to go. It involves choices and freedom and that is right up the alley of unschooling.

Do you think your unschooled children will want to go to college? And if so, do you think their being unschooled will make it more difficult for them?

Yes I think so. So far both of them are quite excited about the idea. My son would love to go right now but because he is only 13 he has to wait 3 years more. He plans to take some computer stuff and to go to culinary. My daughter isnt sure yet, but she has many interests. She told me the other day that she is so excited she can be anything she wants when she is grown up. I love hearing that

TIA for taking the time to help me learn!

Very welcome. I hope it was helpful

"The true measure of a man is how he treats a man who can do him absolutely no good."
peace.gif  Embrace the learning that is happening within the things that are actually happening!    
UnschoolnMa is offline  
#3 of 7 Old 11-07-2004, 11:31 AM
 
SagMom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Posts: 4,979
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I think there's value in college/university if the person WANTS to be there. They might want to go for the experience itself or because their ultimate goal requires a degree.

What one studies in elementary school or high school is dictated by the school system. In college, there is more freedom. Even if certain courses are "required" for a degree, the assumption is that the student has chosen to follow this course of study.

I don't know yet if my kids will want to go to college...but if they do, I don't think they'll have a problem. It'll be an adjustment, but then, it was an adjustment for ME and I went to ps. I DO think that they'll have a different experience than someone who has been schooled, because they will not have been trained in the same way.

I've started to look into "alternative" colleges (there's a thread on that here if you do a search) in the event that my kids aren't interested in a traditional program. Some of these are more like unschooling, in that the student can create their own curriculum or course of study rather than fullfill set requirements with certain credit counts.

There are always options.

Single Mom to 3 (12, 17 & 21)  luxlove.gif and dog2.gif.

SagMom is offline  
#4 of 7 Old 11-07-2004, 06:56 PM
Dar
 
Dar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: St. Louis, MO
Posts: 11,438
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Yeah... college is qualitatively different than K-12 education.You chose your classes, you decide whether or not to show up, you can drop if you want. If you're not treated with respect, you can leave.

Rain plans to start community college classes when she turns 13 (she's almost 12 now). She wants to take classes in the areas that interest her - French, ASL, dance, voice, theatre - and maybe more. Eventually if she wants to get a degree she'll need to take the general studies requirements, but if she's just following her interests she doesn't need to worry about those.

And there are definitely many ways to go. I know lots of unschoolers who have never taken a college class and have good jobs now - mostly in computer programming - and thers who started at 13 or 14 and had an AA before most kids would be out of high school.

Dar

 
fambedsingle1.gifSingle mom to Rain (1/93) , grad student, and world traveler earth.gif


  

Dar is offline  
#5 of 7 Old 11-07-2004, 07:07 PM - Thread Starter
 
kaydee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Hither & Yon
Posts: 2,510
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Thanks, all--that makes a lot of sense to me!
kaydee is offline  
#6 of 7 Old 11-08-2004, 12:17 AM
 
JavaFinch's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: WI
Posts: 525
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dar
Rain plans to start community college classes when she turns 13 (she's almost 12 now). She wants to take classes in the areas that interest her - French, ASL, dance, voice, theatre - and maybe more. Eventually if she wants to get a degree she'll need to take the general studies requirements, but if she's just following her interests she doesn't need to worry about those.

And there are definitely many ways to go. I know lots of unschoolers who have never taken a college class and have good jobs now - mostly in computer programming - and thers who started at 13 or 14 and had an AA before most kids would be out of high school.

Dar
Interesting. I wasn't aware that kids could go to community colleges. What age is the minimum and what do they have to do to enroll (test wise)? Thanks!
JavaFinch is offline  
#7 of 7 Old 11-08-2004, 12:35 AM
Dar
 
Dar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: St. Louis, MO
Posts: 11,438
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I'm sure varies from state to state, and between different counties in the same states. I know in many places in Arizona and California and Oregon, community colleges admit high school students, as well as other "qualified" students without a high school diploma. Some require placement testing, and some don't allow students without a hs diploma to take remedial classes. Most require some sort of documentation from the homeschool (legally a private school for us) or parents or both. The plus side is that tuition is free for students under 18

I know even in our area, some community colleges make it easy for younger students to enroll, and some make it difficult. One did make a rule banning students under 16 unless they had a high school diploma - you can just take the CHSPE here for that.

I also know that some colleges and universities allow homeschoolers to enroll - CSU does, apparently, but you have to apply a year ahead of time if you want to take the class for credit. You can audit easily, though.

Dar

 
fambedsingle1.gifSingle mom to Rain (1/93) , grad student, and world traveler earth.gif


  

Dar is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Drag and Drop File Upload
Drag files here to attach!
Upload Progress: 0
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Mothering Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off