Not vaxing and the ER - Page 2 - Mothering Forums

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Old 03-17-2011, 11:35 AM
 
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Great advice! I have always worried about the ER room. I had just planned on saying, "No, I don't shoot neurotoxins into my child...thanks for asking."   orngtongue.gif

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Old 03-17-2011, 12:10 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Magali View Post
But I did cut my finger a while back and of course they brought up tetanus and if I was up to date.  I was 100% unconcerned that I was at risk for tetanus and I haven't had a shot in over 10 years so I asked the Dr.  "are you concerned that this cut is at risk for tetanus?" and he said no.  So I said that there was no reason to even talk about tetanus and that was that.


I like this approach more than anything I've seen thus far. I've wondered/worried about this question, and admitting to not being "up to date" on vaccines worries me just as much as lying about it does. Honestly, if DD were totally on schedule, I would hate this question anyway. Unless the question was "did your child receive a vaccine within the last 72 hours" or something (if a reaction is a possibility), it simply should not be part of the diagnostic process. Meningitis should not be ruled out if my child has been vaccinated, nor should it jump to the list of "most likely" if she hasn't. It should be all about the symptoms.

 

But asking a question in response seems like a potentially reasonable strategy.

 

I take DD in for stitches... they ask if she's up to date... my answer: "Are you concerned about tetanus?"

I take DD in for high fever and listlessness.... they ask if she's up to date... my answer: "Are you concerned about meningitis?"

etc

Now this won't likely allow me to duck the question, and I'm ok answering honestly. But I like the idea of asking because it opens the lines of communication. If I just say "no she's not" then they'll just decide whatever the hell they want to decide - order lumbar punctures or whatever. But if I say "are you concerned about meningitis" then it's a discussion. They could make a case for why they are concerned, and maybe I'll see their point. Or maybe it will just be BS and I have a better chance of dealing with it then. It's not perfect, but nothing is, and I just like the idea of making it a discussion rather than just an "opportunity" for the doctors.

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Old 03-17-2011, 12:54 PM
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Originally Posted by seashells View Post





I like this approach more than anything I've seen thus far. I've wondered/worried about this question, and admitting to not being "up to date" on vaccines worries me just as much as lying about it does. Honestly, if DD were totally on schedule, I would hate this question anyway. Unless the question was "did your child receive a vaccine within the last 72 hours" or something (if a reaction is a possibility), it simply should not be part of the diagnostic process. Meningitis should not be ruled out if my child has been vaccinated, nor should it jump to the list of "most likely" if she hasn't. It should be all about the symptoms.

 

But asking a question in response seems like a potentially reasonable strategy.

 

I take DD in for stitches... they ask if she's up to date... my answer: "Are you concerned about tetanus?"

I take DD in for high fever and listlessness.... they ask if she's up to date... my answer: "Are you concerned about meningitis?"

etc

Now this won't likely allow me to duck the question, and I'm ok answering honestly. But I like the idea of asking because it opens the lines of communication. If I just say "no she's not" then they'll just decide whatever the hell they want to decide - order lumbar punctures or whatever. But if I say "are you concerned about meningitis" then it's a discussion. They could make a case for why they are concerned, and maybe I'll see their point. Or maybe it will just be BS and I have a better chance of dealing with it then. It's not perfect, but nothing is, and I just like the idea of making it a discussion rather than just an "opportunity" for the doctors.


 

 

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Old 03-18-2011, 12:07 PM
 
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Accessing the EMR of a patient under my care requires no consent from anyone. The EMR is there so that he medical professional admitting you or caring for you has the "global picture" of your health history. We have to take many things into consideration when providing care for patients and having acess to their entire medical record is of great importance if we want to treat them appropriately.

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Old 04-05-2011, 03:24 PM
 
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Originally Posted by PediNP View Post

Accessing the EMR of a patient under my care requires no consent from anyone. The EMR is there so that he medical professional admitting you or caring for you has the "global picture" of your health history. We have to take many things into consideration when providing care for patients and having acess to their entire medical record is of great importance if we want to treat them appropriately.



Do you tell the patients what records you're accessing in order to make decisions, so that the patient can correct any errors, or do you just assume the records are correct?


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Old 04-06-2011, 09:47 AM
 
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Hubby answered sincerely once when we were at the ER. Said we didn't vax and the doc gave the run around. He practically interviewed us over why we would possibly think vaccines could be harmful. And told us that we were wrong. So, honestly, at the ER, where you don't know how they will react - if they ask if we are up to date, I prefer to just say, "Yep." Because we are up to date on all the vaccines I ever intend to give my children. (AKA none) LOL

My family practice doc knows we don't do vaccines and is totally cool with it. I'm so happy to have him around. 


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Old 04-11-2011, 09:02 AM
 
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Old 04-11-2011, 09:04 AM
 
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Old 04-11-2011, 09:16 AM
 
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Originally Posted by miriam View Post





What were you in the ER for in the first place?  Was the question even pertinent?  I have been asked that when I took my boys in for a broken bone; unless the bone is protruding from the skin, vaccine status is virtually irrelevant.  The doctor was wasting your time in an emergency situation.  I am sure the doctor had other patients waiting for care.  I would have reminded the doctor of this fact and the fact that this was not the place to change my mind or his regarding vaccinations. 



I was in the ER because my youngest was puking and had diarrhea off and on for a few weeks and I wanted to figure out what was up. So, I don't feel the question with the vaccines was very relevant in that situation - like with the situation you described. If I don't feel the info is relevant next time, I will just say yep, when asked if my kids are up to date as it really isn't their business unless it's relevant. 


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Old 04-11-2011, 04:08 PM
 
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I have always been honest about my kids' vaccine status. Our oldest only had two rounds of DTaP starting at 18 months and then I just never went back for more. We had a lot of trouble with our family doctor and I finally went somewhere else.  When they asked about vaccines I simply said "it's against our beliefs" and they left me alone. They ask every time I go in and I just say the same thing. No hassle. And they've been very nice. I've had the same experience in the ER. My middle child tipped over the kitchen stove on himself (yikes!!) and I thought he was in serious trouble. When the doctor asked about shots I said no, we don't vaccinate and started to explain and she stopped me. She didn't ask any more questions, for which I was very grateful. Last summer my middle child (seems like he's always the one getting hurt) was running around barefoot in the yard and cut the bottom of his foot open. It was a pretty decent cut and bled like crazy. I cleaned it and covered it and showed the doctor when I took my son in. He saw that it was clean and didn't say a word about a tetanus vaccine (my heart was pounding because I am still a little scared of tetanus and I thought they would talk me into giving him a shot). Now I am worried about school as my oldest will be starting next year. But as for the ER, we have had no problems and I prefer to be truthful for the same reasons as others have posted when it comes to diagnosing what is wrong.

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Old 05-04-2011, 12:40 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Chloebelle View Post
We have been to the ER twice - once for something up the nose, and once for stitches. Both times they asked if the kids are up to date on their vaxes, and in both cases I said no. It was very stressful for me, and I got lots of questions and a nasty attitude by the admitting nurse. IF I ever have to make a trip to the ER again (and of course I hope not), should I just lie?

Never lie to your medical caretakers. They make decisions based on your information, and if the information is not accurate, you might not get the right treatment.

 

One of the best places to catch a vaccine-preventable disease in in the ER.  When a Swiss tourist had measles in Tucson, they had to go through all the medical records of people who were in the ER with her and contact the unvaccinated ones for followup and to let them knoe to watch closely for symptoms.

 

NOTE: An infant who was in an ER room across the hall from the tourist for 45 minutes was hospitalized later (peds ICU) for measles pneumonia. It's that contagious.

 

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