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-   -   Does the lack of separate vaccines impact you in any way or push you towards non-vax? (http://www.mothering.com/forum/443-i-m-not-vaccinating/1373403-does-lack-separate-vaccines-impact-you-any-way-push-you-towards-non-vax.html)

kathymuggle 01-29-2013 08:08 AM

Does the lack of single vaccines  impact you in any way?

 

If you get me in a real compliant mood, I will admit I can see the use in both Polio and measles vaccines.  I doubt I would go so far as to vaccinate anyone for either, but my position towards them is less rigid than other VADs/vaccines. 

 

That being said, I am ticked off (mostly for others) that separate vaccines  for M M and R as well as D T and aP do not exist.

 

It is ridiculous that if I wanted tetanus for my child, I would need to get it with pertussis and diptheria as well.  Gotta love vaccine choice!

 

I have heard that some people actually turn more towards not-vaccinating because of lack of choice.  Anyone here have that happen?


serenbat 01-29-2013 08:38 AM

Quote:
 well as D T and aP do not exist.

most have no clue about this!

 

I just had my grandmother in the ER and she was asked when her last TETANUS was- I spoke by before she could and stated the full shot and the dr shut up and I added OH, you have it just separate? She just looked and me and didn't ask again and my grandmother made it clear she wasn't getting one.

 

I do know another person who "just got a tetanus shot" at the ER! So many think they are getting just one no matter what the facts are. 


Chloebelle 01-29-2013 09:16 AM

It doesn't impact me, but I wish the choice was there for those who do choose to vaccinate.


rachelsmama 01-29-2013 09:21 AM

Yes, the lack of single vaccines makes me less likely to get certain immunisations.
 


sassyfirechick 01-29-2013 01:56 PM

Yep.  It was my initial plan to delay/select vax, but the pedi either couldn't or just plain didn't want to look for singular options for me and after some bad reactions with the combos we stopped altogether.  I've had my daughter tested by an ND and it was narrowed down to Hib and DTaP as the culprits for her reactions, but we can't be certain which specific one(s) are to blame and so the risk isn't worth it to me to continue to vax.  And it has made me chose no-vax for future kids to avoid the potential reactions and need for detoxing all over again.


Turquesa 01-29-2013 06:23 PM

Not quite the same thing but related to the lack of choice...

 

DH turned down a job offer in NYS.  A driving factor in the decision was that their exemption laws don't allow you to pick and choose.  We selectively vax, but if forced to choose between all or nothing, we'd have to go with nothing.  :-(  We briefly debated crossing state lines to get the vaxes we wanted, but since everything is tracked in state-run registries, that wouldn't have worked well, either.  I'm hoping to re-enter the workforce at some point, so homeschooling wasn't a sustainable option. So no NYS for us!  Thank goodness our livlihoods didn't depend on us going there.

 

It would seem like no one in a non-vax forum would understand, but I do wonder how many non-vaxxers in the US would get some vaccines if their states allowed them to choose a handful and file an exemption for the rest. Health departments might be delightfully surprised to see that parents are willing to work with them this way.

 

Whether it's combo vaccine or state laws, vaccine manufacturing practices and public policies, respectively, that deprive parents of choice may be shooting themselves in the foot.


Jennyanydots 01-29-2013 06:36 PM

Yes, there are a couple we'd be more likely to give if they were offered separately.

Turquesa, somethng you said there got me thinking- I think the distinction between non and selective is pretty flimsy in some cases. It's an ongoing decision for many of us, and we just make the best choice we can and hope it's the right one. The way these forums are set up, unfortunately, does not reflect that and creates unnecessary polarization.

Marnica 01-30-2013 09:05 AM

As things stand now - It wouldn't effect my choice. However, in the event of a widespread outbreak of certain diseases, yes I would be more inclined to consider certain vaccinations if they were offered separately.


eireann 01-30-2013 08:09 PM

Possibly. Not sure. Our situation would have to be flat out different, genetically speaking. Our decision not to vaccinate our children was based on a family history of autoimmune diseases on both sides, and ultimately AI death induced by a vaccination (she came down with GBS, dead within two weeks). This was not speculative, this was confirmed by doctors at the hospital; this was during a time when they were free to say the right medical diagnosis without worry about some far reaching societal implication or government muzzling.

If things were different would our decisions be? Probably not. We're living this life, and this is the best choice for our family. However if I planned on selective/delay, split shots would probably make me feel more at ease. Less of a toxic load to be sure. If there was a reaction, it would be easier to make a connection rather than deducing which element of a triple shot caused a reaction. This way, it was one shot, and these are the ingredients, etc etc.

Mirzam 01-31-2013 06:07 AM

1 Attachment(s)

Not at all. It wouldn't matter to me if every vaccine were available singly. None of them are of any value that it is worth corrupting the immune system for. 


nia82 01-31-2013 10:15 AM

Absolutely. My children would have had the measles one by now. (Minimum age for me is kinda 24 months, older would be better, but I will do it this summer at 2.5 years and 5 years for both because of shedding risks and because we will spend a lot of time in Germany and go to areas where measles does indeed go around). The whole reasoning for ACIP to recommend cease production of single shots was to force more people into compliance, which backfired hugely on them. We do want to vaccinate them against measles. But not mumps nor rubella until puberty. And the mumps vaccine is extremely questionable anyways (plus the MMR made me really sick as adult so I'm not gonna do it).


kathymuggle 01-31-2013 11:46 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jennyanydots View Post

 The way these forums are set up, unfortunately, does not reflect that and creates unnecessary polarization.

Just to add on to this….

 

It is not just the way the forums are set up.  It is the way the issue is set up in wealthy, developed countries, period.

 

I think it often easier to get exemptions as a non-vaxxer than trying to get one as a sel/delayed.

 

A lot of the information that is available is very polarised.  It is either "all children by 2" unless you are one of the very few who have a bonafide medical exemtion…or you are cast as a non-vaxxer.  I have yet to see a pro-vax website that is at all tolerant of sel/delayers, I have seen sites I would deem as non-vax that are tolerant of sel/delayed (NVIC and Smartvax come to mind).

 

I do think Dr. Sears is pretty balanced - a little too pro-vax for me, but I still like him.    Anyone else know of people or sites who offer well thought out  sel/delayed views? 


sassyfirechick 01-31-2013 02:52 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by kathymuggle View Post

I think it often easier to get exemptions as a non-vaxxer than trying to get one as a sel/delayed.

 

A lot of the information that is available is very polarised.  It is either "all children by 2" unless you are one of the very few who have a bonafide medical exemtion…or you are cast as a non-vaxxer.

 

I really wish it was easier to get a medical exemption, OR, that one from an ND would be accepted.  At the time of my DD's reactions, her pedi agreed 100% that what she was experiencing were in fact vaccine reactions, fairly bad at that.  But a month later her tune changed real quick as she tried to convince me to continue on the regular schedule.  Our ND on the other hand, took one look at her history and the reactions and backed my decision to stop vaxxing saying DD had a high likelihood of more severe reactions in the future.  She did give me an option that if I chose to vax that she would help with detoxing after and give me time frames for spacing based on that, but I'm happy to stay away from the needles.


emmy526 01-31-2013 03:34 PM

no, not at all...they were available separate way back when, when my kids could have gotten them...i, on the other hand, got a measles only vax 28yrs ago, due to an outbreak somewhere in my state at the time.  This was in 1984.  


Asiago 01-31-2013 05:45 PM

Hmm, that's interesting that you should raise that question. I would say 'no' for my decison but years ago, when I began to research veterinary vaccines for my dog, I learned that one of the prominent issues with multivalent veterinary vaccines was that you never knew which component had caused a reaction. In order to know, you would opt to do one vaccine at a time when possible. In veterinary medicine, recognition and acknowledgement of adverse reactions is much more open. The whole topic of adverse reactions involves much more frank talk, such as avoiding multivalent (combo) vaccines when concerned about anaphylaxis. Here is an example (my apologies for being off topic), but really the atmosphere and acknowledgement of adverse reactions is so different than in human medicine:

http://www.petfinder.com/dogs/dog-health/vaccinations-side-effects/


Asiago 01-31-2013 05:45 PM

Hmm, that's interesting that you should raise that question. I would say 'no' for my decison but years ago, when I began to research veterinary vaccines for my dog, I learned that one of the prominent issues with multivalent veterinary vaccines was that you never knew which component had caused a reaction. In order to know, you would opt to do one vaccine at a time when possible. In veterinary medicine, recognition and acknowledgement of adverse reactions is much more open. The whole topic of adverse reactions involves much more frank talk, such as avoiding multivalent (combo) vaccines when concerned about anaphylaxis. Here is an example (my aplologies for being off topic), but really the atmosphere and acknowledgement of adverse reacitons is so different than in human medicine:

http://www.petfinder.com/dogs/dog-health/vaccinations-side-effects/


pek64 01-31-2013 06:41 PM

Combo vaxes definately push me toward non-vaxing.

prettysymmetry 02-01-2013 04:17 PM

Yes, the lack of single vaccines makes me less likely to get certain ones but after what happened may not vax at all. My baby had a nasty rxn that we thought would b permanent after the PCV. She was awfully sick for eight says, had a fever that broke twice, lethargic for a few days, jerky iris/eye movements when trying to focus on an object, throwing up and diarhea. Thankfully we did shot by itself or her immune system may have been too compromised & her jerky eye movements may have been permanent as they were in other (immediately post-vaxxed) children we researched (who did all the recommended shots at once)..

prettysymmetry 02-01-2013 04:52 PM

Thank you so much for this information.

prettysymmetry 02-01-2013 04:55 PM

Thank you Asiago for the info

MissCee 02-17-2013 01:32 AM

When my DS was a newborn, yes I would have vaccinated him had there been single vaccines. That said, I know a lot more about vaccines now than I did when he was born 19 months ago and I would never ever get him vaccinated regardless of whether or not they were single vaccines. 


Asiago 02-17-2013 06:37 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by prettysymmetry View Post

Thank you Asiago for the info

You are welcome.


Asiago 02-17-2013 08:15 AM

A bit more on multivalent (combo, poly vaccines):

 

Quote:

Vaccines, including polyvalent products, should be selected to include only those antigens appropriate for the specific risk needs of the patient, thereby eliminating unnecessary immune system stimulation and thus lowering potential risks of adverse events. Veterinarians need to be aware of the risk of "endotoxin stacking" with the use of multiple Gram-negative vaccines.

https://www.avma.org/KB/Policies/Pages/Vaccination-Principles.aspx


contactmaya 02-24-2013 07:25 AM

It has led to procrastination....my soon to be 5yo never received  his mmr after my long efforts to track down monovalent vaccines 4years ago.  His older brother got the monovalent vaccines. ... 


ma2two 02-24-2013 06:10 PM

I wouldn't give my kids any vaccines now, but earlier in my research, I probably would have given the single tetanus vaccine it if were mercury-free, and FDA approved under the age of 7.


Songy 02-24-2013 10:34 PM

Yes. I think that it is a big reason why I started to question vaccines in the first place. Now, I don't think it impacts me much bc I doubt I'd vaccinate anyway (except I am a bit worried about Rubella bc I have a daughter and don't want her to get it when she is PG.) For me, the CDC planned backfired. I don't think I would've questioned vaxxes nearly as much if they hadn't added so many to the schedule and limited the options. Also, adding chicken pox. Having had CP, it just seemed silly to vax against it. Maybe they are hoping in a generation, everyone will begin to fear CP like the rest of them. . .


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