Reusing a Christmas Tree? - Mothering Forums

Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
Old 11-26-2008, 04:13 AM - Thread Starter
 
boigrrrlwonder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 1,024
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
So, I really want to real Christmas tree. I live in the city, and I see all these waldorfy crafts I'd love to do that require seasoned wood, and I decided that I might try to do some of them with the trunk of the Christmas tree - which has inspired me to try to find ways to reuse the rest of the tree. I've heard of making incense and tea out of the needles, but I know nothing about this. Any suggestions?
boigrrrlwonder is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 11-26-2008, 09:14 PM
 
Rhiannon Feimorgan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Diagonally parked in parallel world
Posts: 4,918
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I've never reused the needles. My tree usually get's put in the garden where it becomes a bean pole. The needles fall off and compost themselves in the soil.

I live in an area where it is very easy to go out and cut a wild tree and that is what I have always done. So I'm not worried about chemicals. If I was going to use a commercial tree for food(tea) I would try and find out how the tree was grown.

I think using the tree for crafts is a great idea! I saw a beautiful twig wreath that would be a great way to use the smaller branches.

Let there be beauty and strength, power and compassion, honor and humility, mirth and reverence within you.)0(
Rhiannon Feimorgan is offline  
Old 11-27-2008, 06:35 PM - Thread Starter
 
boigrrrlwonder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 1,024
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
A twig wreath sounds like a cool idea, too. I've heard that most trees, even grown conventionally, tend to be low to no pesticide, but I still need to look into that more.
boigrrrlwonder is offline  
Old 11-27-2008, 07:39 PM
 
Rhiannon Feimorgan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Diagonally parked in parallel world
Posts: 4,918
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I think you're right that Christmas trees are grown with little or no pesticides. I do know though that the greenery used by florists is often dipped in something to help it stay fresh longer. I used to work in a florist's shop at one point and dipped a lot of greens but I'm not really sure what the stuff was. This was before I questions things like that.

I'm not sure if trees are ever treated with the same kind of preservative. I know that most trees you buy in December were probably actually cut in October or even earlier before there was too much snow. So they are not going to be that fresh and my be treated to help them last.

Of course if you cut your own tree, at a farm or in the wild then you don't need to worry about that.

I think you also would want to look at what species of tree you had. I know spruce and pine make nice tea but I think there might be some sorts of evergreens that are toxic.

Let there be beauty and strength, power and compassion, honor and humility, mirth and reverence within you.)0(
Rhiannon Feimorgan is offline  
Old 11-28-2008, 01:15 AM
 
Pumpkin_Pie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Vermont
Posts: 4,587
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rhiannon Feimorgan View Post
I'm not sure if trees are ever treated with the same kind of preservative. I know that most trees you buy in December were probably actually cut in October or even earlier before there was too much snow. So they are not going to be that fresh and my be treated to help them last.
Seriously????? I never knew that! I was debating going to a cut your own this year, because I would have a toddler strapped to my back, or standing beside me as I prayed he didn't get too close to the saw. I may have to recruit a friend to go with me to the tree farm and hold his hand while I cut down a tree. I can't imagine a tree that has been cut down and is already two months old being much good. Dang!

Formerly single Mama to the zaniest boy on the block, born on my birthday on 3/28/07. Soon to be Mama to a new little and can't wait to bfinfant.gif and femalesling.GIF and familybed1.gif again! 
Pumpkin_Pie is offline  
Old 11-28-2008, 08:35 PM
 
jrabbit's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Houston
Posts: 2,039
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
It is *still* better than a plastic tree. The Christmas tree industry tends to be American, family owned, and employ lots of small families around the country, doing all the various parts of the process. (don't quote me on that - because I'm sure there are exceptions)

If we could go cut our own, we would, but being 8 months pregnant, I am NOT driving an hour to do it!

--janis

Mama to 3 girls 12,8,3
jrabbit is offline  
Old 11-29-2008, 01:53 AM
 
Minerva's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Downers Grove, IL USA
Posts: 441
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrabbit View Post
It is *still* better than a plastic tree. The Christmas tree industry tends to be American, family owned, and employ lots of small families around the country, doing all the various parts of the process. (don't quote me on that - because I'm sure there are exceptions)
If you're just worried about reusable, we have one of those old aluminum trees. It's about 50 years old and still in great shape. When it starts really falling apart, we can put the branches in the recycling since they're all-metal and repurpose the center pole.

2 happy kids makes for a happy mother.

Minerva is offline  
Old 12-01-2008, 12:17 AM
 
jrabbit's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Houston
Posts: 2,039
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
FYI: We just got a tree at the Houston Garden Center (chain of nurseries here), and it had a tag from www.ChristmasTreeCoalition.org = I looked at the website, and it seems pretty reasonable. Not "perfect" - they do allow some pesticides - but it's pretty good for mainstream trees, in a big city, I think. Our tree came from Oregon, by the way.
----------------------------
Congratulations on selecting a certified "green" Christmas tree that was grown under stringent environmental criteria of the Coalition of Environmentally Conscious Growers. Please recycle your Christmas tree.

This tag certifies that this tree was gronw on a farm that was evaluated by an independent auditor using the following criteria:
- riparian/wetland management
- soil and water conservation
- nutrient management
- pest management
- worker health and hygiene
- biodeversity

Mama to 3 girls 12,8,3
jrabbit is offline  
Old 12-01-2008, 03:21 PM
 
Caneel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Small town in a rural area
Posts: 3,835
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Another idea if your turnk isn't suitable for crafting - your town/city may have a recycling program for the trees.

The town I live in pickes up the trees for free. The trees are ground up for mulch and compost, which is then free for the taking by any town resident.

Mom to DS, born fall 05 after ,,, wife/best friend to DH We have
Caneel is offline  
Old 12-02-2008, 02:08 AM
 
CallMeKelly's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 1,584
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Quote:
A creative use for Christmas trees is to save the needles to create potpourri. Dry the branches, then remove and crumble the needles. Mix the needles with cinnamon sticks, whole cloves and Christmas scent. Place in jars to store.
http://www.uwex.edu/news/2001/12/rec...have-many-uses

hth
CallMeKelly is offline  
Old 12-07-2008, 04:27 PM - Thread Starter
 
boigrrrlwonder's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 1,024
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by CallMeKelly View Post
Neat article! I wish I had a yard...
boigrrrlwonder is offline  
Old 12-07-2008, 04:37 PM
 
odenata's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Posts: 1,969
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rhiannon Feimorgan View Post
I know that most trees you buy in December were probably actually cut in October or even earlier before there was too much snow. So they are not going to be that fresh and my be treated to help them last.
Where? I know that's not true here in the PNW - trees are cut usually the same day they are taken to the lot (if you are getting them on the lot - lots of cut your own around here).

I don't know about trees sold at big box stores, etc. b/c I've never bought them.
odenata is offline  
Old 12-07-2008, 10:23 PM
 
Rhiannon Feimorgan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Diagonally parked in parallel world
Posts: 4,918
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
You know this was one of those time where I was repeating something I've heard but can't back up.

My bad.

I watched a tv show several years ago about where christmas trees come from. How they are cut and stored and so on. I'm pretty sure it was focused on the big box store's trees.

At the time I filed it away as another reason I don't buy trees, I go out and cut my own.

Let there be beauty and strength, power and compassion, honor and humility, mirth and reverence within you.)0(
Rhiannon Feimorgan is offline  
Old 01-11-2009, 06:25 AM
 
skreader's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Hong Kong
Posts: 681
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
We have a small cypress in a pot that we keep on our roof-top garden. In Advent, we bring it down and decorate it. After Epiphany we return it to the roof-top.

I've also used indoor ficus trees as X-mas trees; and once a Schefellera.
skreader is offline  
 
User Tag List

Thread Tools


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off