Autistic two year old and going tv free? - Mothering Forums

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#1 of 4 Old 01-07-2011, 06:01 PM - Thread Starter
 
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My son uses tv to calm down during/after meltdowns and as a distraction..it also helps me get things done around the house. I also have a 2 month old.

But I know that screens are bad for any kid, but especially for autistic kids. I want to turn it off cold turkey on Monday. We're thinking of putting the tv in the closet so he won't be able to see it...

 

So what can I do with him to distract from the fact that there's no tv? What can I use to distract him when he's melty?


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#2 of 4 Old 01-08-2011, 06:57 PM
 
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I don't have much experience with children with autism (not at that young age anyway, I teach middle school), but I so admire you for taking this step and wish you luck.  

 

Just a few ideas I thought of:  listening to audiobooks (maybe the same one each time for routine or a few that are favorite books he's already familiar with), listening to soft music (maybe even from favorite tv-shows?), a warm bath, doing art work.  I know some children with autism have sensory problems that might make them adverse to textural things (like a bath or messy fingerpaints) but if your child likes those things it might work for you.  Anyway, hope this helps and all the best!


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#3 of 4 Old 01-09-2011, 11:37 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Thanks those are good ideas...I'm not sure if he'd "get" audiobooks..he's not very verbal yet so I don't know what he understands at this point.


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#4 of 4 Old 03-25-2011, 01:49 PM
 
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I work with kids with Autism and I think going TV free is great, you may even see a reduction in his behaviour after an adjustment period because he may sometimes throw tantrums because he knows in the end that he will get the tv to calm down, or he is just a routine for him (or you may not see a decrease as well if there is no relation).

 

Some ideas if you can get some books - Pivotal Response Treatment for Kids with Autism by Koegal - it is a really good way for parents to be able to play "games" with the kids and teach them at the same time.  Also Building Bridges through sensory integration is good and so is More than words for specific "games" or interactions you can have with them.  

 

All of these are things that you have to do with him as play skills for our little guys is hard to do independently.  

 

I have heard Relationship Development Intervention is really good but is hard to follow through the book and floor time is excellent for teaching playskills but very involved.

 

As for a quick and easy distraction from melt downs, going for walks sometimes works with some of my kids, or sometimes they have a particular thing they like - letters, numbers and playing with these helps. Sometimes just having a routine works - so having balloons in the same place and he goes with you to get one, picks one out, you pump it up and go to a particular room and he plays (you can also incorporate some of the games from the books mentioned in the balloon play) - and going through the routine is very calming if they are starting to get anxious.

 

There is a huge reduction in tantrums in kids who learn to communicate (either with words, sign or pecs) so you might be able to start reducing the melt downs by working on his communication, though this isn't an quick and easy fix hopefully it will help with knowing that one day you might be able to have few or go without melt downs.

 

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