Toddlers with Asthma??? - Mothering Forums

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#1 of 14 Old 12-03-2004, 03:32 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Well here's our background....

My son was diagnosed with asthma at about 10 months of age. I guess we are fortunate that he has the kind that only appears EVERYTIME he gets sick with a cold....meaning when he comes down with a cold we can expect his asthma to kick in so we have signs....whereas allergy and such related you don't always know. (sorry not good with the technical name of it)......

He has a nebulizer and the med's but this doesn't always spell relief for him. I don't really know what my question is but I guess maybe I'm wondering if anyone else has experienced this and tried other things with their children. He is going on day three of this crud & wheezing this go around

Thanks for listening
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#2 of 14 Old 12-04-2004, 02:45 AM
 
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nak ~ what neb meds is he on? how often? any other meds?
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#3 of 14 Old 12-04-2004, 06:35 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Originally Posted by Jessica36
nak ~ what neb meds is he on? how often? any other meds?
His neb medicine is albuterol and he's taking it every 4-6 hours
If he's not drastically changed by morning I'll be taking him to his ped !
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#4 of 14 Old 12-04-2004, 06:49 AM
 
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Albuterol is a rescue med. You need a maintenance one also like Pulmicort. That is everyday and helps strength their longs. also check into Singular to help to.

HTH
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#5 of 14 Old 12-04-2004, 07:12 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Originally Posted by Jessica36
Albuterol is a rescue med. You need a maintenance one also like Pulmicort. That is everyday and helps strength their longs. also check into Singular to help to.

HTH
Thank you! I will talk with his ped tomorrow about it. He only gets asthma when he gets a cold....everytime. It doesn't show up otherwise! Is Pulmicort a steroid ....And singular is an allergy medicine I believe ? Can a 17 month old take these medications?

TIA off to bed now!
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#6 of 14 Old 12-05-2004, 03:01 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Update:

Well I took Luke in to his ped this morning like I said I was going to

After 2 hours we were finally able to get out of there

He had 3 neb treatments and they gave him his first ever oral steroid. He is doing much better but the doctor is going to see him tomorrow on his day off He wants to be sure that he makes the turn and gets better so he won't have to be admitted to the hospital. I haven't ever heard of a doctor seeing a child or anyone on a Sunday on his day off unless of course they're in the hospital & such.

Anyways thank you
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#7 of 14 Old 12-23-2004, 04:55 AM
 
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My 2 yr dd has just returned home from a 5 day hospital stay as a result of asthma. She had her first attack about 8 months ago, and after getting the nebulizer at the hospital was fine to go home. Then about 1 mo ago, while we were visiting family in portland she had another attack - by the time we got to the hospital it was fairly scary. Then last week, she developed a runny nose, followed by cough, and I knew we would end up at the hospital. I thought it would be for a nebulizer fix and we would be home...5 days later we came home.
She is now on Pulmicort two times a day and Salbutamol four times a day.
I tend to be a faily positive person, who sees herself as a conciensous parent, so when the asthma first started I didn't "freak" out about it. However, I have learned that it is much more serious than I thought.
While at the hospital in Portland they sent us home, I now know, when they shouldn't have. On this last hospital stay they discharged us and then while we were playing in the play area I notice her breathing becoming laboured again, so I was readmitted.
This is what I have learned from these last three experiences:
- obviously, trust your mommy instinct.
- many people tend to not want to go to the hospital, (who can blame them,) go.....
- The pediatric nurses and my new pediatrician, drove home the point that little bodies are different then big ones... sometimes they will just stop if they are in to much distress, without much warning. So go to the hospital if your child has ANY laboured breathing. We now have meds at home, so I have been told if she has laboured breathing at all, while on the meds, go immediately. Better safe than sorry.
- One of the real eye openers of this recent experience was learning about oxygen levels, I now know my child should be at 95 minimum and holding that easily. While travelling the hospital discharged her when she was at 88.... which is not okay. I also know that my child responds really well to the meds, and then they wear off in about one hour, so it is important for me to stay at the hospital until well after this time.
Sorry that I have gone on so long, I just really want to drive home the point that we need to trust our instinct and learn about how our child reacts and find really supportive drs.

On a different note, I would be interested in hearing from others who are on a crazy med schedule like we are (4 times a day, every 6 hours) .. how are you working it into your life? Is it affecting your child's behaviour (being that pulmicort is a steroid/stimulant.)

We have had the allergy testing it was all negative, but I know that it will often not show intollernces. Anyone had any success with cutting out certain foods?

Wow - for a first post that was a long one

Karen
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#8 of 14 Old 12-23-2004, 05:52 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Another update for us~

But most importantly Karen oh I am so sorry! I totally feel with you. My little one did end up having to be hospitalized on 12.15.04! It was terrible. I had to call 9-1-1 b/c his lips turned blue and he was working the hardest to breath I will never forget his little tummy pushing in and out so hard I was in the process of giving him a neb treatment and the fire dept/medics arrived fast (praise God). And you are SO right trust your instincts they don't lie!

His reading on the pulsometer AKA oxygen level in your blood was 55 (yes terrifyingly low since its supposed to be over 90 normally!) Yes Karen my eyes popped out of my head on this one! I was so scared my heart dropped when I saw the reading but I just prayed so much harder. They immediately started oxygen and continued the albuterol at the same time. We were transported by ambulance (for the first time in my life) within 3-4 minutes (real time not stress time!)

Luke had like 10 albuterol treatments that day and oxygen continued while in the ER. The Ped Asthma doc just happened to be walking by the ER and saw Luke and we talked and he guaranteed me he'd be admitted

His discharge papers said primary: Asthmaticus Secondary: Viral URI The upper respitory infection was the cough, runny nose and fever that just would not go away. Five out of six of us had the Viral URI. I refused to get it and still have not! The viral URI's are tough on Asthma kids or even the common cold has been tough on Luke it makes his asthma flare up everytime! Anyways back to the hospital the doc's and nurses had to suit up just to come in our room. Also whenever we'd leave the room we'd have to wear a mask it was like being locked in the room but understandable~to protect everyone else.

So for now Luke is on Flo vent (inhailer) with a spacer that he has to take once in the am & once in the pm. And we will see if he still needs his nebulizer at all. Today is day one on the flo vent and everything seems well so far. Our doc said to follow up in a month. As well we're going to shoot for this treatment until April/March I am not a fan of steroids but I was reassured that these are way different than "oral" ones. We just finished up day 6 of "oral" steroids for Luke yesterday. 3 tsp's of med's is too much for an 18 month old (he had a double ear infection to boot so 2 tsp of that is amoxocillin).

Sorry for my long post now :LOL
Blessings to all
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#9 of 14 Old 12-23-2004, 06:11 AM
 
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Just a quick post. My older son (who is turning 5 in jan.) Was diagnosed with asthma when he was a wee baby, too. Guess what? About six months ago, he got a cold and....no asthma!!! He would get it EVERY time he got a cold before that. I had to take him to the hospital many times. He started daycare in Sept. and has a couple of mild colds since he began and let me tell you, there was no such thing as a mild cold with him before. I have heard that this particular type of asthma often can mend as children grow. I pray that he has outgrown it, and I pray that your little Luke does too.
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#10 of 14 Old 12-23-2004, 03:07 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mamajama
Just a quick post. My older son (who is turning 5 in jan.) Was diagnosed with asthma when he was a wee baby, too. Guess what? About six months ago, he got a cold and....no asthma!!! He would get it EVERY time he got a cold before that. I had to take him to the hospital many times. He started daycare in Sept. and has a couple of mild colds since he began and let me tell you, there was no such thing as a mild cold with him before. I have heard that this particular type of asthma often can mend as children grow. I pray that he has outgrown it, and I pray that your little Luke does too.
Oh my gosh that is such a blessing that it sounds like he outgrew his asthma already I pray that he has too Could you please share your experience of what you had to do when his asthma flared up? Did you just do neb's when that happened or was he ever on any preventitive medicines?

I had childhood Asthma really bad as a child too. I pretty much have outgrown it as an adult but not entirely 100%. I still have an albuterol inhailer that I probably only take maybe 2-3 times a year
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#11 of 14 Old 12-24-2004, 02:46 AM
 
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I was hesitant to use a preventative long-term inhailer because of the effects of the steroids, but the trips to the hospital and doses of prednizone finally changed my mind. My doctor, who is very good and conscious not to overmedicate advised me to give him the inhailer every time he began to cough. It is called Advair 125.
It contains salmeterol xinafoate and fluticasone.
He got "the coughs" as he called them every couple of months and at the first sign, we were puffing twice a day. It seemed to help somewhat, the rushes to emergency stopped anyway. Then my instinct sorta kicked in and I decided to hold off when he got a cold. Voila, we didn't need the puffer.
I still have it handy as I am not sure he's done. In fact, he started coughing yesterday coincidentally. It worries me this time a bit, because he has no other signs of a cold. I'll just practice watchfull waiting on this.
The asthma seemed to hit a peak during his second-third year.
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#12 of 14 Old 12-28-2004, 12:57 PM
 
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Mamajama, great to hear that your little one is doing better and that the inhaler helped manage it. Mamatothreeboys, my eyes did pop out of my head when I saw that his oxygen went to 55, wow what a scare for you. I also wonder how you managed with 2 other little ones at home.
Have you checked out the naet.com web site, or the Reversing Asthma book by Richard Firshein. Both are directed more at adults but definilty worth a look.

Karen
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#13 of 14 Old 12-28-2004, 02:15 PM
 
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Oh Hugs. Ok a few things I have learned and I will share. During the cold season you really want a maintenace med, it will help. Pulmicort has actually been shown to strength their lungs and help them get healthier so they may not need the meds. Singular while advetised for allergies, REALLY helps asthma and to keep it in check. Advair good med, BUT the inhaled version has Lactose in it so if you have a child with a dairy allergy, it might be a problem.

HUGS
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#14 of 14 Old 12-29-2004, 08:50 AM
 
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My dd does fine on flovent and albuterol. We do the flovent only once a day (at noc), but twice a day during cold season.

My dh is on Advair; it is a lifesaver for him. He has never been better.

My oldest dd probably had slight asthma...she was on singular for a while, but she simply outgrew it. She is in general healthier than her sister and dh.

My youngest takes Zyrtec pretty much year round. I think this helps alot.

We limit dairy (if everyone starts to get really snotty and sick, we just eliminate it for a while) and everyone takes a multivit, acidophilus, and Emergen'C daily. Fresh air and exercise helps. Eliminating airborne allergens helps, too. Just opening up the windows for five minutes a day, even if it is horribly cold out, will help. Change the filter on your furnace monthly.

Good luck! I hope your kiddos feel better soon! It is a scary thing, and I'm sorry you have to deal with it. I get so frustrated with dh; he has had fairly severe asthma all his life; I feel like sometimes he is too cavalier in his attitude towards it. Once I called 911 when he was having an asthma attack and couldn't move enough air to even talk. He refused to go to the hospital; they gave him a treatment and he was much better, but I still think he should have gone. He thought I over reacted. Umm, I'm a nurse, at the time I was working on the medical floor that handles things like lung issues. When someone can't move enough air to talk, that's bad, honey. I'm not waiting until you completely freeze up and then the kids get to watch me unsuccessfully attempt CPR on their father. We discussed the fact that if his lungs competely close up, I can't help him; it came as a surprise to him that CPR doesn't work in that situation. I called his doc and had her call him the next day to talk; since then he has been much better about it.

Long point being; I don't think dh got the education he needed as a child. He really needed to have a wake up call to motivate him to take better care of himself. I'm sure this is an issue with many people who have chronic diseases. He says he felt like a) he was married to a nurse and b) medications had always worked when he got in trouble. So he really felt like he didn't need to manage things to closely because I and/or the meds would be able to prevent anything from getting too bad. Some heavy re-education by the doc and some blunt words from me helped. But I'm watching out for this with my youngest; I don't want her to get lazy about managing her asthma and get too reliant on medications and not take some personal responsibility in it. Does that make sense?

Good luck, mamas! Here's to healthy babies!
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